/ First rope

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climbwhenready - on 31 Oct 2013
Hi,

I've been climbing for a few months, and I'm thinking of buying my first rope sometime in the new year and I wondered what advice the forums might be able to give...

My budget situation at the moment is such that, for now, I want one rope for everything - indoor leading, outside toproping (SE sandstone) and I'm hoping to start trad sometime next year. Then in the future I can supplement or replace (depending on its lifespan) with more appropriate ropes for different climbing styles.

I'm thinking of a 60m rope. Don't need dry treatment because I'm not going to be out in the rain or ice. Having looked online, I quite like the DMM Statement, and my local climbing shop also said that this was a good one - but am I missing any tricks? Is there an obvious better first rope? Will I wish I'd asked for more advice in 6 months time? Should I be getting unicore?

Thanks for any tips you can give to a beginner!
SteveoS - on 31 Oct 2013
Otis - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

Looks like today is 'new rope thursday'! A not dissimilar thread has started in the gear section today too - possibly worth a peek?

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=567737

Mike.
sparra - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

My first was a 60m which I still use several years later - too long. You spend forever pulling it through and I've never got near using 40m of it in single pitch or sport in this country. That's the advice I wish I'd heard before I went for it.
Choss on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

All ropes are equally safe i reckon.

Fancy finishes like Dry ropes are a con in my Opinion.

If you want a single rope i reckon Beal edlinger 10.2mm is as good as any, and at a good Price.
Choss on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

Oh, and Second Hand ropes might seem good but its a Critical safety item, so buyer Beware and all that.
climbwhenready - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to Otis: Hmm, I did not mean to duplicate threads! mea culpa and all that.

sparra: I'm interested that you say 50m is enough. (I know that for indoors 30m would be ideal, but I think that's too short to be used outdoors too.) What about places like Portland - I read somewhere on t'interwebs that pitches are getting longer than 50m. Is there truth in this?

Choss, thanks for the advice. I was also getting the impression that there's no safety difference in ropes from the 'good' manufacturers. And I'm not interested in the second hand market for critical items like this.
Choss on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

No worries bud.

Forget the 30m, unless you only Intend to ever Climb plastic or southern sandstone. You never Know when you might have to ab off in extremis, or claw your way up a Long slope to Reach a Belay.

Any rope CE or UIAA Certified will be fine. Only mugs pay extra for Dry ropes etc, in my humble Opinion.
BnB - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:
> (In reply to climbwhenready)
>
>
> Any rope CE or UIAA Certified will be fine. Only mugs pay extra for Dry ropes etc, in my humble Opinion.

Only mugs and winter climbers. How much do you want the rope to weigh by the end of the third pitch?
Choss on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to BnB:

To be fair. The OP was Talking about rock climbing, not ice jocking, werent they?

Besides, one ab and the Treatment is done. Brilliant Value? Keep paying.
jack_44 - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

I recently bought my first rope. I was looking round all the sub 100 50m ropes. A 50m rope is all you will need, I think a 60m is necessary only when heading to the continent for some sport climbing. I settled for a mammut vertex. At that price range and for my grades (vs maximum) I don't think there is much of a difference. This rope will be sufficient until I improve enough to require double or ropes. So I wouldn't worry too much. Just try and have a feel of them first and pick one.
1poundSOCKS - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to sparra: Depends on where you climb, one if the new sport routes at Stoney Middleton ('4,000' I think) ideally needs a 70m. We used a 60m and had to downclimb from the 1st bolt. Every time I buy a rope, I wish I'd got 10m more.
bpmclimb - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

Sounds like you need a general purpose workhorse single rope, about 10mm diameter. All certified ropes are well made and very strong, so I wouldn't at this stage bother about features such as small diameter, dry treatment, unicore, etc, all of which push the price up. How long the rope lasts is much more to do with how you treat it than what the specs are.

Regarding length, if you're already anticipating trips to Portland, then a 60m is probably your best bet - there's a fair few 25m plus routes. Also, as you're not yet considering double ropes, a 60m single will give you considerably more flexibility at crags which require abseil descent (lots of those in the Wye Valley, for example). The downside is that you have to lug the extra 10m around, although you won't really notice that too much indoors, if you use one end, with the rest stashed in a (IKEA) bag.

For deals online, try joe-brown, banana fingers, urban rock, cotswold outdoor. For your needs the DMM Statement is fine, also Tendon Smart, Mammut Vertex, Beal Edlinger 2, and many more. If it were me I'd just go for the best deal.

One last tip - check carefully along the whole length of your new rope for manufacturing defects before you use it (rather than notice it as it runs through your hands while belaying). They're not common but they do occur, and dealers are understandably reluctant to exchange climbing gear after use.

Hope this helps - happy climbing!
RIH - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready: I bought an 60m Edelrid Python a while ago and fouund it to be a nice handling rope at a decent price!
Otis - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to RIH:

The other bonus with a longer rope is, if the ends start to go a bit soggy of fluffy after repeated knot tying, you can chop them down and still have a usefully long rope.

Mike.
Hooo - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:
If you're a southern sandstoner like me, I'd recommend you get a cheapy 30m for the sandstone and the wall and get a 50 when you need it. I'd already worn out my first 30 by the time I needed longer ropes. It'll save you money in the long run, and loads of time coiling it.
climbwhenready - on 01 Nov 2013
Thanks everyone for all the advice, it's useful. I'm putting Christmas presents towards this so I'll see what good deals are about in January for ropes with reasonable reviews and the suggestions in this thread!
Trangia - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:
> Hi,
>
> and I'm hoping to start trad sometime next year.


> Don't need dry treatment because I'm not going to be out in the rain.


You are obviously an optimist!! :)
climbwhenready - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to Trangia: ahem. Let me rephrase.

If it is p*ssing it down, I am likely to call it a day rather than going "oooh, this is fun!" :-)
sparra - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

Sorry for the delay - I climb Yorkshire/Peak grit and occasional mountain routes - never needed full length, but as others have said, it maybe depends on where you're regularly climbing. If I get enough cash I'm going to buy a short (35/40m) for grit to save carrying the long one.

Go outdoors have an extra 15% off everything over 80 at the moment and often have the best prices on their limited range anyway.

Worth a look
ads.ukclimbing.com
Otis - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to sparra:
> Go outdoors have an extra 15% off everything over 80 at the moment and often have the best prices on their limited range anyway.
>
> Worth a look

Some of their prices are indeed tempting if you know exactly what you want - just don't go there expecting any knowledge, advice or customer service from the staff!

If my local Go Outdoors is representative of the chain I'd definitely suggest visiting a proper outdoors shop if you want to chat through the pro's and cons of different ropes with someone who knows what they are talking about.

Mike.
BnB - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to sparra:
> (In reply to climbwhenready)
>
> Sorry for the delay - I climb Yorkshire/Peak grit and occasional mountain routes - never needed full length, but as others have said, it maybe depends on where you're regularly climbing. If I get enough cash I'm going to buy a short (35/40m) for grit to save carrying the long one.
>

I have a 40m single since that is enough for any grit route without the extra weight and tangling. On Lakes/Wales mountain days I've yet to find a multipitch that couldn't be managed with a 40m. Perhaps I'm choosing routes with shorter pitches :-). Not saying a 60m wouldn't be more useful in some situations, but it's about balancing weight and ease of management with length.

Jonny2vests - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to SteveoS:

60 is way more versatile than 50, on most grit routes you can fold it in half and learn some double rope technique.
mrdigitaljedi - on 01 Nov 2013
Spend the extra on an Ederlid python 50mtr you wont regret it, i have got 1 and i find it a much better rope..In reply to climbwhenready:
timmyhobby - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to climbwhenready: my first was a 30m and ive found it good for 90% of the time
bpmclimb - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to all:

Regarding weight, an extra 10m of an average 10mm rope weighs about 0.7 kg. If you are planning to run the Himalayas with it you'll definitely want to save that calorie expenditure. I'd suggest that for most UK cragging it doesn't really signify.
Jonny2vests - on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Yes. And you get to train heavy!
Choss on 01 Nov 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Gotta agree with bpm.

Rope weight in UK not an Issue.

Any crag more than 100m walk is too much for most Climbers, and aint worth bothering with

7;^)
mikebarter387 - on 20 Nov 2013
In reply to climbwhenready: Not exactly what you were asking about but more information on ropes then you care to ask for.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_cZHbuLcoY
Nath93 - on 20 Nov 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:
Get the cheapest 50 or 60 meter single from a decent manufacturer and go with it, you won't mind it wearing out so much that way. With climbing partners, offer to bring your rope and their rack, switch and swap etc. I got a 50m Tendon rope for 50 this time last year and its been very well used (still with plenty to give) and i'm upgrading to some 60m halfs for the winter season and trad routes up the hills next summer. The 50m will be chopped to 35m for indoor use, easy scrambling days and small single pitch stuff.






Firestarter on 20 Nov 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

Decathlon are doing a 70 for around 90, it's a Simond. I know it's long but it lets me and my son do some long top rope climbs. I guess length depends on your circumstances, fnarr fnarr.
Joel Perkin - on 30 Nov 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

I don't know if this has been said or not already, but I managed to get an Edelrid Python for about 60 from Go Outdoors. Seems to be a very tough and handles well.

Hope this helps,
Joel
climbwhenready - on 30 Nov 2013
Thanks all for the extra advice. I'm waiting til after Christmas - and some of the offers people have mentioned aren't around any more - but thanks anyway!
mrdigitaljedi - on 01 Dec 2013
In reply to climbwhenready:

I brought the ederlid python 50m from hitch n hike for 95 which is a very good rope, also u might want to consider a rope bag to go with your new rope, you want to look after your rope no just stuff it into your rucksack.
IPPurewater on 01 Dec 2013

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