/ Stay safe, climb hard and live long

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Gecko2k - on 05 Jan 2014
We all know climbing comes with its risks and accept them as part of what is a exhilarating and rewarding sport. I've not posted on these fourms before, but with all the bad weather the uk as been hit with lately my mind has wondered to the "what if".

Inland there has been torrential rain with flooding and there has been lots of areas of coast hammered by storms and very high tides.

I just came across this and had to share:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25604696

As they say sharing is caring... Stay safe, climb hard and live long :)
badwabbit on 05 Jan 2014
In reply to Gecko2k:

Indeed, but Hastings cliffs aren't really climbable, they are clay and sandstone, very soft and vulnerable to weathering... you're not going to see something of that size very often on more solid rock, like Limestone at Portland etc...
Howard J - on 05 Jan 2014
In reply to badwabbit:

> you're not going to see something of that size very often on more solid rock, like Limestone at Portland etc...

... or Pembroke? What about Wraith at Mother Carey's? "What was once a finely positioned jamming crack is now a finely positioned arete"

Of course in the Alps stonefall is common:

http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=55233

In the UK things are generally more solid, but mountains and cliffs are continually eroding, and it's wise to keep this in mind, and hope you're not underneath (or stood on) anything big when it goes.
Rob Exile Ward on 05 Jan 2014
In reply to Gecko2k:

I started a thread of a list of routes that I'd done that had since fallen down: from memory they included Yankee Doodle, Unknown Gully (that may have been blown up, mind), Wraith, Fandango, Merlin, Dier Bield Buttress...
Ian Parsons - on 05 Jan 2014
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

Indeed - worth resurrecting! Conscientious Objector, Wicked Gravity, the bit of Zodiac that passed through thereabouts, something on the West Face of the Drus...
LeeWood - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Gecko2k:

but to keep things in perspective, - it's remains more risky to be on the road
Dave Garnett - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Ian Parsons:

... Valhalla, Stiff Little Fingers, Alternative Ulster, Blind Prophets...

GridNorth - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to LeeWood:

> but to keep things in perspective, - it's remains more risky to be on the road

That's the problem with statistics though. I knew many people who have been killed climbing but I don't know anyone who has been killed on the road. I know where I feel most at risk.
In reply to GridNorth:

> That's the problem with statistics though. I knew many people who have been killed climbing but I don't know anyone who has been killed on the road. I know where I feel most at risk.

Agreed 100%.


Chris


Dave Garnett - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Ian Parsons:

... Berlin, Mainsail ...
Bulls Crack - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Dave Garnett:

Marsden Pinnacle
Iain Peters - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Gecko2k:

Off the top of my head at least 35 along the coasts of Devon and Cornwall. Given the recent storms down here that figure may well rise. Lower Sharpnose has to be extremely vulnerable.
MikeYouCanClimb - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to GridNorth:

> but to keep things in perspective, - it's remains more risky to be on the road


> That's the problem with statistics though. I knew many people who have been killed climbing but I don't know anyone who has been killed on the road. I know where I feel most at risk.


I am not sure it is a problem with statistics though, just because people interpret and use them to support their belief does necessarily not mean the statistics are wrong.

I also know climbers who have been killed but don't know anyone killed in a road accident.

It would be interesting if LeeWood has actually seen a statistic that could stand up to scrutiny to support his claim. The irony is that I too have the general impression that climbing is safer than crossing the road.

There must be another explanation, maybe more down to the way stats are compiled and presented.
Trangia - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to GridNorth:

> That's the problem with statistics though. I knew many people who have been killed climbing but I don't know anyone who has been killed on the road. I know where I feel most at risk.

My first regular climbing partner was killed in a road accident. It came as one hell of a shock, still makes me feel emotional, because whilst we both knew that it might happen when climbing, we had discussed the possibility, I never expected that.
Choss on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to badwabbit:

you're not going to see something of that size very often on more solid rock, like Limestone at Portland etc...

I Dunno. All this wet in Limestone cutting away at the block joints. Bit of Freeze thaw now can see whole routes or Pitches come down, like perfumed garden at Wintours and unknown gully area at Avon last Winter.

10m waves battering south west today. Culm must be losing some rock/mud id think.
Iain Peters - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Choss:

Intend to visit Lr Sharpnose this coming weekend, to install a chain belay/abseil station on the Middle Fin....if it's still there.
rotax123 on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to badwabbit:


Theres a little strip of harder sandstone further on (Or there was) The last year or so the cliff's above it have been looking more and more dodgy.
Several weeks ago at this particular location there was clay/mud seeping through from behind and the large cracks spanning the length of the cliff looked as though they may just break away. I did infact say to myself "i'm sure the entire section will come off soon"

Yay I was right! But, I have lost the only outdoor "climbing" within walking distance!
http://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/crag.php?id=1075

LeeWood - on 29 Jan 2014
Gecko2k - on 24 Feb 2014
The reason I skipped going to Portland this weekend...

http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=68735

Be safe all!
The Pylon King on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to Gecko2k:

There is no such thing as safe.

Acknowledge the fact we are at the mercy of mother nature and fate, take risks and live a possibly shorter but higher quality life.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Trangia - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to GridNorth:
My best friend and first climbing partner was killed in a car crash, so it does happen .

In the 54 years I have been climbing 5 close friends have been killed in climbing accidents, 2 more have died from cerebral hemorrhages, one died from a massive heart attack, one died following the early onset of Alzheimer's when he was 50, and one committed suicide as a result of alcoholism. All 11 were climbers and all died prematurely. The youngest was 21 the oldest was 64.
Post edited at 20:23
Bob Moulton - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to badwabbit:

In fact there are/were a couple of climbs on the Hastings cliffs in question. climbed by Phil Thornhill in 1983! It is doubtful if either were ever repeated. However, these cliffs look positively solid when compared the the cliffs further east along the coast with routes such as Monster Raving Loony and Reasons to be Fearful, where the dangers include 'mud flows'!
Tom Last - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Bob Moulton:

Those routes are still there in the video. The E1 Norman Corner is the obvious corner just to the left of the rockfall. The VS is further left again.

Don't know if they've ever been repeated though.
Trangia - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Tom Last:

> Those routes are still there in the video. The E1 Norman Corner is the obvious corner just to the left of the rockfall. The VS is further left again.

>

Looking distinctly unstable, it wouldn't surprise me if this also falls soon. There have been further rock falls to the East of the section in the video, and a major landslip in Ecclesbourne Glen which has been cordoned off. Walking in the Glens is unpleasant and very slippery mud.

CurlyStevo - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Chris Craggs:

> Agreed 100%.

> Chris

Whilst conversely I know many people that have died or been seriously injured in road accidents but none personally that have died or got seriously injured climbing.
CurlyStevo - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Gecko2k:

> The reason I skipped going to Portland this weekend...


> Be safe all!

Portland is very well known for mud slides during weather like this. Its somewhere I tend to avoid in these sort of conditions, it doesn't rule out other more stable venues though.
Tom Last - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Trangia:

> Looking distinctly unstable,

Ha didn't it ever! mad climbs.

Al Evans on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Tom Last:

I knew lots of people who have been killed in climbing accidents, and a few who were climbers who were killed or badly injured in road accidents, e.g Al Harris, Dave Banks, Hugh Banner and Percy Spring are just a few that quickly come to mind, Al drove like he climbed so maybe was an accident waiting to happen, but Percy and Dave were the safest climbers you could imagine, it's just cest la vie often.
victorclimber - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Trangia:

do you mind if we don't become friends ....
victorclimber - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Al Evans:

wasn't Percy in the back of a mini van when he got injured ...
In reply to Gecko2k:

Can I just "Stay safe, climb and live long" please?


Chris

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