/ Getting old..

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tiga271 - on 31 Jan 2014
So the time has finally come that safety has prevailed over vanity and I've realised I can't accurately read a map without reading glasses :(
Any tips on how to manage this on a winter day out, blizzards, wind, gloves etc ?
Thanks ! Simon
BnB - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

I feel your pain. I use disposable bifocal contact lenses. Very effective though you lose a bit of detail in the distance. Better than staying home, mind.
Albert Tatlock - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Braille
All the Gear, No Idea on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to BnB:

defo, contact lenses, revolutionized my life, and i got vari/bi focal type lenses, no issues what so ever
All the Gear, No Idea on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to Albert Tatlock:

always someone with waste of time answers, to good questions
Sean Kelly - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271: Check the fine detail on your map with the little magnifyer on your compass (silva type). Works without glasses, but not if you compass is very old and heavily scratched.

Welsh Kate - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Yep, contacts, cos glasses steam / freeze up.
dek - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

I'm hoping someone comes up with a source for those compact, little, credit card sized ,illuminated magnifiers?
iani on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:
Hi -
I stick the part of the map i'm going to use on the photocopier and magnify it to 145% and put plastic film on it , which helps. If you enlarge it a bit more you could hold it at arms length !

I'm short sighted and need to take my glasses off to read a map (and i'm nearing the stage where I need to do this to put small wires in too(!) - I remember an orienteering event I entered where I had to stop and take my glasses off everytime I needed to look at the map , which resulted in the slowest time ever..- i've taken up mtbing which I can do with glasses on!

good luck
ian
SteveoS - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to Welsh Kate:

I hate rain on my glasses. I'm short sighted so I have the opposite as I can't see features but can see the map not a problem at night/white out mind.

I wear contacts only for outdoor/water sports.
tiga271 - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to All the Gear, No Idea:

Made me laugh though :)
Contact lenses sound like a good idea, emotionally painful though ! Ah well, off to opticians then.
tiga271 - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to iani:

Hey, great idea !
wilkie14c - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to iani:
> (In reply to tiga271)
> Hi -
> I stick the part of the map i'm going to use on the photocopier and magnify it to 145% and put plastic film on it , which helps. If you enlarge it a bit more you could hold it at arms length !

This ^^^^

I'nm struggling these days too. I use memory map and can print out an A4 page of the bit I need incresing the scale to 1.12.5K doubling the size. Laminated pages with a route description on the other side. Can be used again if req. Or get your mate to do the reading!

Albert Tatlock - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to All the Gear, No Idea:

End of the week, Friday night, so sorry I attempted to be humorous, I realise it has no place on UKC.
Timmd on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to Albert Tatlock:

In a not wanting to divert the down a path of discussing where humour is and isn't appropriate on UKC kind of way...there's a forum called Down The Pub.

Erm, that's it really. Have a nice day all.
ow arm - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

tough carp just deal with it i wear glasses all the time
Welsh Kate - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to SteveoS:

Yeah, me too, only wear the contacts for outdoors stuff and the gym. I don't need them to read so when I know I'm going to be doing lots of navigational stuff I only use one contact (in the worst eye) and use the other one for mapreading.
doz - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Monocle on a string so you can't lose it....I think it looks rather dapper too but my kids seem to think otherwise...
tcb on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

I wear one contact for close work and one for distance. Works really well. Brain sorts out the confusion and adjusts. I can look ahead to see where I need to go, then read the map when I need to. Also use Anquet software to print the map I need to 200%,then acetate the copy.
shirleynot on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Try Sat Nav...
tiga271 - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Thanks everyone, very useful, will try a few of the options.
Albert Tatlock - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Laser eye treatment or larger font on your maps
veteye - on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Another vote for varifocal contact lenses.Except mine are hard gas permeable ones.
Prior to that I used normal contact lenses that adjusted just for the myopia and then used those reading glasses that come in a slim case.I still carry them in my top internal pocket of my rucksac.
Father Noel Furlong on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Contact lenses are only good if you can wear them......i can't. I'd suggest you do what i do, wander endlessly in the dark until you find somewhere recognisable.

My eyesight is so bad now i can't even read the label on my shower gel......it could be bleach for all i know!
Prof. Outdoors on 31 Jan 2014
In reply to dek:

Plastic magnifiers available from magnifico.com
I use their credit size one attached by cord to the map case. Also keep one in my wallet for general use. They also do passport size cards as well for general planning. Magnifico are a very helpful company and made a pack of assorted sizes for me. Very good.

Drawback is when holding a map, holding a magnifier above the map and then trying to use compass.

I also use Memory Map and print out my 1:50 map at 1:25 scale.

On the topic of scale I also find it easier to use 1:50 in the hills rather than 1:25. There is so much information, lines, boulder fields on 1:25 that I find the countours get slightly lost.



Albert Tatlock - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Have you considered getting yourself a guide dog, preferably a husky for winter conditions? :)

Apologies if my attempt at humour is offensive to any members, however, I am sure that you (the OP)are intelligent enough to differentiate between genuine and 'tongue in cheek' replies!
Trangia - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Welcome to the Old Fart's Club. I've found map reading has become increasingly difficult as I get older. I can hardly read the map in my study when planning a route, let alone on the hill! Contour lines are particularly indistinct.

I've tried photo copy enlargements, and the built in magnifying glass on most Sylva compasses is really useful.

It's also an increasingly difficult problem when wearing goggles for hill walking or skiing, particularly the latter when they mist up over my glasses inside the goggles. Like others I can't wear contact lenses.

Consequently I increasingly turning into a fair weather skier.
dek - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to Prof. Outdoors:

Thanks for that, I'll have a look!
doz - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to Trangia:

I was being serious about the monocle guys...you get them online for about 30 quid..just need the reading bit of your prescription...with abit of practice stays in your eye while both hands fumble with map/compass/ zimmer frame etc... I can now read OS contours again in a whiteout... I still get lost though
Tim Sparrow on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Another possibility is orienteering glasses. ridiculous looking half moon things,, you can focus on the map, look over the top and see the world in normal clear vision.
Get them from http://www.compasspoint-online.co.uk/acatalog
- Vapro OLP Half cutaway Glasses kit. Have a tidy short elastic, that keeps them in place.
If you want to look a complete nerd, go for the headband versions!
They also have magnifiers.
Mind you, I rather like the monocle idea. Would be great to train the eyes so that one looks at the map and the other at the terrain!
ads.ukclimbing.com
tiga271 - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to doz:

Have purchased a monocle ( didn't see that coming ! )

llechwedd - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to doz:

> I was being serious about the monocle guys...you get them online for about 30 quid..just need the reading bit of your prescription...with abit of practice stays in your eye while both hands fumble with map/compass/ zimmer frame etc... I can now read OS contours again in a whiteout... I still get lost though


Do monocles fog up more than glasses, since they are closer to your face?
I've just seen a rimless monocle on ebay for 8- it looked good for knockabout purposes but I imagine it could mist up easily.

When using your monocle, do you find that your view of a map is more affected by raindrops than would be the case if you used a magnifier up against a map?
doz - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

> Have purchased a monocle ( didn't see that coming ! )

Congratulations and welcome to a small but very distinguished group of climbers!
doz - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to llechwedd:

> Do monocles fog up more than glasses, since they are closer to your face?

No...get one with what they call a gallery which is sticky out bits that jam in our eye and hold the lens out

> When using your monocle, do you find that your view of a map is more affected by raindrops than would be the case if you used a magnifier up against a map?

No...cos you are looking down at the map!
Stone Idol - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Ah, well, the real pain comes when you not only need specs to avoid falling over clumps of heather but need another pair (or multiple lenses) to read the d.........d map. For the record it is the case that some of us prefer to hide behind their bins!
cousin nick - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

I have the same affliction. Distance vision perfect, but reading is bad, especially in low light. I tend to carry a pair of reading glasses in my rucksack all the time, plus a spare pair in the first aid kit. Harveys also sell those prismatic magnifier sheets for mapreading I bought one and have made a hole in one corner to tether it to my Silva compass cord.

N
OwenM - on 01 Feb 2014
Darron - on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:
What I do :
Bing maps - OS map - select 1:50 or 1:25 - full screen - over area required - print screen - copy & paste to a word doc - crop - maximise to landscape page size - print.
Obvious problem is the area you can fit on (carry OS map and specs as backup?)but it works surprisingly well.

martinph78 on 01 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Do you use a hood or cap? I wear glasses all of the time and it's not as bad as you'd think 99% of the time, and a cap really helps keep most of the rain/mist/snow off my glasses.

I guess your biggest problem will be putting them and off constantly, but if you get a decent case attached to your shoulder strap I don't think it would be much of a problem. Also, clip one of these to the case:

http://www.parkcameras.com/17606/Spudz-Spudz-6x6-Inch-Micro-Fibre---Black.html

If the weather is truly horrendous then goggles go over your glasses, and you won't be able to see very far anyway so may as well leave them on.
AndrewW - on 02 Feb 2014
In reply to Stone Idol:

> Ah, well, the real pain comes when you not only need specs to avoid falling over clumps of heather but need another pair (or multiple lenses) to read the d.........d map. For the record it is the case that some of us prefer to hide behind their bins!

Varifocals? Worked great for me.
andy foers - on 02 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

I think i may need glasses.I thought the post read getting OLD!!!!Oh dear..Spec savers here i come!
ow arm - on 02 Feb 2014
In reply to andy foers:

eh?
andy foers - on 02 Feb 2014
In reply to andy foers:
Thought it said cold not old,missed typed!
Robert Durran - on 02 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

If the weather is crap enough to necessitate map reading in anger, my glasses are ususally too fugged up to be of any use, so I just take them off.
Rog Wilko on 03 Feb 2014
In reply to Albert Tatlock:

> Have you considered getting yourself a guide dog, preferably a husky for winter conditions? :)

> Apologies if my attempt at humour is offensive to any members, however, I am sure that you (the OP)are intelligent enough to differentiate between genuine and 'tongue in cheek' replies!

Keep it up, mate. Some of us enjoy a smile.
Rog Wilko on 03 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Contact lenses can be a good solution, as many have said. I think what you're suffering from is called presbyopia which is reduction of focussing ability caused by stiffening of lenses with age. So if you don't want the cost of and possible problems with adjusting to bi/multi-focal lenses you might do what I've done for some years now - have a close-up lens in one eye for reading/map reading and a less strong lens in the other for distance. If you don't need anything for distance, then just one reading lens may be OK. The way the brain interprets and uses the different information it's getting from the two eyes is just amazing.
For some time I have been using the lenses which you keep in night and day for a month - very fiddle-free. As I age even more - dry eyes - I've found that I can't tolerate that any more so am just using daily disposables which I put in when I'm going to go walking climbing or cycling.
I can confirm that for me this works very well for climbing - I can see gear placements in dark cracks!
wercat on 03 Feb 2014
In reply to Rog Wilko:

I find not carrying a map helps - then I don't need specs to read it! Embarrassing if someone asks you to look at their map of course!





Actually I try to carry a pair of 2 specs from Penrith market in my pocket.




Grayone - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

I too use cheapo 'reading' type glasses from the chemist and this helps a lot, though finding them and putting them on does slow me down, especially on a Mountain Marathon! For 'normal' outings I find that scanning the right bit of a newish OS map and enlarging it, then printing the bit you want is the easiest thing - but what if you go off the bit you have printed, just take the original and those glasses!! I'm also red/green colour blind, and have been for years and find an enlarged map helps a huge amount. (Maybe that is why I was no good at Mountain Marathons!)
pistol on 06 Feb 2014
In reply to doz:
Can you post the link you bought the monocle from?

I feel I may need to join this club after realising last week-end that I can no longer read a map except in bright light.
Post edited at 09:28
karinh - on 06 Feb 2014
In reply to Tim Sparrow:

Waterstones also do creditcard sized magnifiers.
JohnnyW - on 06 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:
I've been worrying about this as I contemplate my WML assessment. My eyes have deteriorated significantly in the last 3 years, and I really struggle with maps now.

I have already used the 1:50 blown up trick, and that works great if you know where you're going. It doesn't if you don't - I can't lug a printer with me to Glenmore Lodge!

I do use the magnifier on my Silva 4, and that will probably be my resort at this juncture, but I fear I will need something more 'formal' soon ;(
Post edited at 10:21
rplince - on 07 Feb 2014
In reply to dek:

I've got one, really good company called "UltraOptix" they make loads of different types but the one with a light and credit card size is good.
nniff - on 07 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Maplins - round magnifying glass for a few
tom_in_edinburgh - on 07 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Put the map on your phone with ViewRanger or something similar. Zoom in when you need to see detail. Its 2014, fixed scale paper maps are past their sell by date.

Ron Walker - on 07 Feb 2014
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:

> Put the map on your phone with ViewRanger or something similar. Zoom in when you need to see detail. Its 2014, fixed scale paper maps are past their sell by date.

I would have thought if you could see a map on your phone your eyesight would be pretty good!
Ron Walker - on 07 Feb 2014
In reply to pistol:

> Can you post the link you bought the monocle from?

> I feel I may need to join this club after realising last week-end that I can no longer read a map except in bright light.

Interestingly I noticed my eyesight for reading small print was a lot better in the Alps or on a very bright sunny day!
jcharles - on 08 Feb 2014
In reply to dek:
> (In reply to tiga271)
>
> I'm hoping someone comes up with a source for those compact, little, credit card sized ,illuminated magnifiers?

Have a look here:

http://www.harveymaps.co.uk/acatalog/navigation-aids.html
Rog Wilko on 08 Feb 2014
In reply to Ron Walker:

Not so surprising - it's like a camera lens. When the light is brighter you have a smaller f-number (aperture) which gives you more depth of field i.e. you don't need to be able to focus so close for the writing to be in focus.
robandian - on 08 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

so here's the problem - reading bit for varifocals at bottom so how do you fiddle in that high runner when you can't see into the crack anymore - also every diy fix seems to be looking up not down -(can't wear contacts)-does anyone make varifocals with magnifying bits at the top ?This would solve the problem of falling over on the walk with the lack of focus on my feet.
Stairclimber - on 09 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

Closely examine the (Memory) map on the computer and memorise detail (while you still can!!!). Use a large hand held magnifying glass, like a stamp collector, in the field. Get others to check what you do and be involved in mapwork whether it's a group or partner, share the responsibility as it makes it more interesting anyway.
ads.ukclimbing.com
scrabblingpunter - on 13 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

I find 1:50000 maps blown up to 1:25000 and then laminated are fantastic for poor conditions when my glasses will usually be stuck in a pocket because they are too iced up to see through. Doesn't need excessive pre-planning.
Alan Breck on 14 Feb 2014
In reply to tiga271:

I wear contacts now. Variofocal. Designed for map reading and I have cut down on the distance aspect.

I use Toughprint maps printed out from the computer. One side showing a fairly large area (1:50,000) The second side I blow up to show the specific area that I'm either interested in or where the nav is tricky.

Third option has to be a mapping GPS....but if you can't read it....?

For goodness sake don't get a Husky as one wag suggested. I used to have two. Absolutely mental in snow & as they were attached to me any outing was a gas. Navigation wasn't even considered. I see that the Southern Cairngorms SAIS guy has two but he seems to let them off. Best of luck with that!!

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