/ Mountain painters

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kevin stephens - on 04 Feb 2014
With the current Facebook campaign to promote art in the form of paintings I'm discovering and being pointed at lots of interesting painters. However those trying to capture mountains are often cliche views lacking the empathy us climbers and adventurers enjoy with these wild places. I'm aware of some climbers who paint like Chris Parkin, but can anyone direct me to other great famous or obscure painters who have depicted mountains in a way that we can identify with?
Simonj - on 04 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

Hi Kevin,

I really like this guys work, check out the website

http://www.renanozturk.com/


Si
Only a hill - on 04 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

Jamie Hageman is my favourite modern mountain painter. His work is breathtaking:

http://www.jamiehageman.com/page3.htm
Bulls Crack - on 04 Feb 2014
kevin stephens - on 04 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:
Jamie Hageman and Ginger Cain are too literal for my taste. Art should not be just tracing over photos but communicating what photos can't capture. I'm sure Cezanne would have done a brilliant job if he had endured a cold mountain bivy but like most artists he would have just viewed them as backdrop to a more immediate foreground.
Post edited at 21:09
toad - on 04 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

I have a Malcolm Edwards in my living room

http://www.malcolmedwardsart.co.uk/gallery.html
keith-ratcliffe on 04 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens: They aren't very fashionable nowadays but the watercolours of W Heaton Cooper were the first mountain paintings that I saw that caught the atmosphere of the Lakeland Fells.
kevin stephens - on 04 Feb 2014
In reply to toad:

Yes, that's more like it!
Mick Ward - on 04 Feb 2014
In reply to toad:


Holy shit! Thanks for putting this on.

Out of 40 images, I click on one - entitled Hiraeth. 40 to 1 odds against and yet your eye goes unerringly to what matters most (to me).

Mick
PaulTanton - on 05 Feb 2014
You'd need a lot of magnolia to do Snowdon. And wouldn't emulsion wash off in the rain? Just a though.
felt - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

> I'm sure Cezanne would have done a brilliant job if he had endured a cold mountain bivy but like most artists he would have just viewed them as backdrop to a more immediate foreground.

If Van Gogh had been up there in winter it might have looked a bit like this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Giovanni_Segantini_002.jpg
Tall Clare - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

What about Beth Fletcher? Some of her recent work here: http://www.bethfletcher.co.uk/page6.html
Tall Clare - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

A lot of Michael Stuart Green's work is more representational, but his digital prints (made by drawing on a tablet) of Glen Shiel might be of interest: http://www.michaelstuartgreen.com/gallery.php?id=12&view_image=121
The New NickB - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

Andy Parkin would a good example of a climber / painter.

http://www.andyparkin.com/
Al Evans on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to The New NickB:

And why has no one mentioned John Redhead?
The New NickB - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to Al Evans:

> And why has no one mentioned John Redhead?

You just have!
Tom V - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

Kyffin Williams was an outstanding Welsh landscape painter whose work is often of Snowdonia.

My personal favourite is James Wheeler, whose specialty is Pennine landscapes in a semi-abstract style, though I have seen a few of his featuring Skye.

And don't forget Bill Peascod.

The New NickB - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

I quite lie some of Jean Thomas' work, but it is very unfashionable.

http://www.lochharportgallery.co.uk/prints.htm
goosebump - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to PaulTanton:

I really like some of Kyffin Williams work (youll need deep pockets to get an original these days). Less mountainous, more lived in.
AllanMac - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

As an act of blatant self-promotion, I actually paint the mountains of Scotland and Wales myself, in watercolour:

macdougallan.zenfolio.com
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toad - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

Mine was an impulse buy in the Y capel gallery/tourist information in Llangollen. They have some really nice Welsh mountain landscapes, though not always Malcolm Edwards stuff
unfit - on 05 Feb 2014
Guy - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

http://www.robfairley.com/ Rob used to guide and has spent a lot of time in Nepal, hence a lot of his work is of Nepalese people but I have to say some of his mtn scenes are fantastic. I have a preference for his more impressionistic works.
Dave Garnett - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

I have a few by local (Leek) landscape artist David Hunt, including one of Hen Cloud, but maybe Gareth Buxton is more what you are looking for. Acrylics, almost abstract, but very atmospheric of moorland tops and edges:

http://garbleart.blogspot.co.uk/2011_04_01_archive.html

We have one of a storm on Curbar Edge, with a contrasting Dave Butcher photograph of a storm approaching the Curbar millstones - similar subject but dissimiliar in every other way.
Tall Clare - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to Dave Garnett:

I like those - a woman called Diane Metcalfe does something similar, with plenty of weather in her paintings: http://www.dianemetcalfe.co.uk/di_metcalfe_painting603.htm
Tom V - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to goosebump:

As far as I'm aware you can still get interest free loans to buy original art, 10 months to pay it off.
Tall Clare - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to Tom V:

The OwnArt scheme? http://www.ownart.org.uk/
Tom V - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to Tall Clare:

Thanks, TC.

Kevin S -just remembered that my mate cragtyke has got a brilliant print of the Pass on his wall. It's by a painter called William Selwyn.
Jim Braid - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

Jim Curran?

http://www.jimcurran.co.uk/
felt - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

Howard Somervell was pretty useful, a sort of John Sell Cotman in the Himalaya.
toad - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

I like this guys work, although he sounds a mite self-important

http://www.philipgray.com/artist/altitude
felt - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to toad:

If you're going to have that then we might as well have a spot of Paul Bonner:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v56/greenbat/bonner.jpg
toad - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to felt:

I think I met him last time I camped in the Ogwen Valley
felt - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to toad:

Great. I know him a bit, really nice guy. Lives in Denmark now; you can see the Lakes in much of his work, a favourite haunt years ago.
https://bnetcmsus-a.akamaihd.net/cms/content_entry_media/FRDDB6J7I0J51355511851902.jpg
j0ntyg on 05 Feb 2014
toad - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to felt:

ah. I meant the guy in the painting ;)
felt - on 05 Feb 2014
In reply to toad:

I was wondering, he never goes to Wales!
Bulls Crack - on 06 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:

I'm sure Cezanne would have done a brilliant job if he had endured a cold mountain bivy but like most artists he would have just viewed them as backdrop to a more immediate foreground.

Not at all - his series of paintings of Mt St Victoire are widely considered as the starting point for abstract art
malk - on 06 Feb 2014
In reply to felt:

> Howard Somervell was pretty useful, a sort of John Sell Cotman in the Himalaya.

some of his work here: www.mountainpaintings.org/
felt - on 06 Feb 2014
In reply to malk:

Or here, even:
http://www.mountainpaintings.org/T.H.%20Somervell.html

Thanks for that; I'd not seen the non-Asia ones.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Jim Walton on 06 Feb 2014
In reply to kevin stephens:
Julian Cooper's work is brilliant. I'm yet to find a modern artist of his caliber. The mountains really jump out at you yet the detail is brilliant.

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