/ Why do people have slings and daisy chains at walls?

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PPP - on 17 Feb 2014
Hi there,

I have been climbing for a while, including leading. I have seen many people, but especially staff (if they are instructing someone, not just climbing), having few slings and daisy chains attached. Why? I have noticed that almost every staff member at other wall (with only autobelay systems) have at least one daisy chain.

Prusik knot with a crab makes me wonder "why", too.
ChrisBrooke - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

Slings and daisy chains are most often used for attaching lighter climbers to ground anchors, or for setting direct belays to ground anchors if teaching a group/children's party or some such.

Screwgate with a prussik on is on a lot of people's harnesses as standard, including mine. I've a ropeman dangling on my chalk bag crab, and a tiny screwgate with prussik on my leg loop. This is for abseiling/ascending. I'm a trad climber and don't have a special 'indoor training harness' so the standard gear stays on my harness so as not to be forgotten.

Hope that clears it up for you.
galpinos - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

You always climb with a screwgate and prusik on your leg loop and a ropeman on your chalkbag regardless of what you're climbing?
martinph78 on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to galpinos:

I always carry a couple of prusskis and a screwgate on my harness also. Saves forgetting it and it makes bugger-all difference to my grade ;)
PPP - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

Well, both walls I have been to haven't ground anchors. Especially the one with autobelay systems only.

The only one use I could come up with was to connect yourself with a sling to quickdraw, but I don't see point why (is that even possible/allowed while indoor climbing?). Also, they weren't setting any new routes.
galpinos - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to Martin1978:

I have all my gear of a loop of old rope and just take whatever is required for that trip, if I'm climbing on the grit, the pulleys, ropeman and tat stays at home. Having a krab on my leg loop constantly would get on my tits. Each to their own I guess!
PPP - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to galpinos:

Some people even boulder with harnesses on. If they are my mates and they rent the gear from the wall, I insist them taking harnesses off. I haven't seen anyone bouldering with their own harnesses, though.
JIMBO on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

With a sling and prussic you can take tension off the belay device to remove fingers or hair before lowering the climber...
WJV0912 on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

If not ground anchors then possibly in case of having to swap over belays if they're supervising novices and something goes wrong.
kfv - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

most of the kit on an instructors harness is for customer rescues. Sling can be used for ground anchors and for climbing into in-situ bolts during a rescue, prussiks for taking a climbers weight off the rope and a screwgate quickdraw for attaching the person that is being rescued to the instructor.

Plus all this extra kit comes in handy when running groups.
Neil Williams - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

Not wearing harnesses while bouldering is in the rules of quite a few walls, certainly Big Rock in MK.

Neil
galpinos - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

There used to be a guy at Bear Rock who always had pussics and a first aid kit on his harness when climbing. Always had a krab on the outside of his rucsack too.....
PPP - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to Neil Williams:

It's a rule at my local wall too, but how many people (especially people who were signed in by members) really read the rules? Harness itself is not that dangerous, but clipped carabiners and other stuff might seriously hurt yourself and others.
martinph78 on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to galpinos:

> Always had a krab on the outside of his rucsack too.....

I do that also ;) In fairness I have that many mixed activities/roles that I get fed-up packing/unpacking for different stuff, and I'm pretty forgetful! It still didn't stop me forgetting my boots the other week. Maybe I should tie those to my rucksack too :p

PPP - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to kfv:

Thanks, I have been looking for such an answer. However, none of these two walls have ground anchors and daisy chains are extremely common at wall where only autobelays are being used. Maybe if autobelay gets stuck, it might be worth to have a sling...
martinph78 on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

Maybe ask them next time you're there? Would be nice to know the answer :)
PPP - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to Martin1978:

I get there only once in few months, but I will try to ask my mate who goes there often!
Ban1 - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:
I'm going with what JIMBO said. Sounds the most plausible.
Post edited at 17:48
galpinos - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to Martin1978:
> I do that also ;) In fairness I have that many mixed activities/roles that I get fed-up packing/unpacking for different stuff, and I'm pretty forgetful! It still didn't stop me forgetting my boots the other week. Maybe I should tie those to my rucksack too :p

I'm a keyboard warrior and new dad so when I get out it's a big event so I can pack especially! I think I'd take the krab on the sac and getting out lots option.....
andi turner - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

I use a thin sling to tie on my chalk bag, that way I've always got a prussik in an emergency. Saves having superfluous equipment in the way all the time.
martinph78 on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to galpinos:

Even with the weather this month I still wouldn't swap it for dirty nappies! Wish I could afford a drying room though :)
ashley1_scott - on 18 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

All centres are different but the one that I can instruct at has a policy of all instructors that are working to carry on their harnesses 1x Sling, 1x Prusik, 2x GriGri's and 2x ATC's.
This is just in case there is a rescue needed, then centre manager or other senior staff know that they can go upto any other staff and have the gear available to do the rescue.
I still carry my prusik on my harness by my chalk bag even if not instructing, it weights next to nothing even with the carabiner and it is out of the way.
andrewmcleod - on 18 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:
I have a friend who works at an autobelay only kids climbing thing, and they have to (once per day?) climb up to the autobelay, secure themselves, then pull out the entire length of the autobelay strap to check its condition. This may explain the daisy chain (as well as securing stuck climbers when lowering them together etc).

Having practiced basic belay swapping/counterbalanced ascending on my SPA training, I am now always carrying a prussik and a pair of screwgates on my harness just in case (although obviously would always defer to wall staff first!). I will add a screwgate and sling when I remember, useful for clipping climber to be rescued to yourself as well as securing yourself...
Post edited at 13:22
Jonny2vests - on 18 Feb 2014
In reply to PPP:

Lots of very sensible answers, but I fear the most obvious one has been missed.

Some people just like big timing it around the place to show they've got loads of gear and to hint at their windswept and interesting climbing CV. This often goes hand in hand with the fact that everything they have is gleaming & shiny :-)
Ban1 - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Jonny2vests:

could be true as I used to see a shirtless gym rat that used to take all his trad gear out with every biner to come with it to get to his harness.
girlymonkey - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to andrewmcleod:

> I have a friend who works at an autobelay only kids climbing thing, and they have to (once per day?) climb up to the autobelay, secure themselves, then pull out the entire length of the autobelay strap to check its condition. This may explain the daisy chain (as well as securing stuck climbers when lowering them together etc).

When I worked at a wall with only auto belays, we used to help people let go on a regular basis! So you climbed the line next to them, stuck your cows tail onto them, and grabbed them down with you! This was not as traumatic for them as it sounds, as it gets them out of their scared place quickly, and you are with them so they feel safer. I have to say this was mainly kids, I would be less inclined to do it with adults.

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