/ 9 edges challenge, training

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alasdair19 on 23 Mar 2014
Hello

Need to RUn To stay fit. Have decided that this looks good.

Ran at school when playing rugby, have run a 10k many years ago.

Done a reasonable amount of hill walking and mountaineering.

Ran for 30min yesterday and enjoyed it though feel legs are more tired than I am out of breath if that makes sense.

Handily live in rivelin how soon should I run to stanage? How do I avoid injuries? Warning signs? I have a pair of inovs do I need anything else?
thedatastream on 24 Mar 2014
In reply to alasdair19:

From memory, its 95% on good trail/path. Navigation is fairly straightforward. Build up to the distance slowly and have fun.
johncoxmysteriously - on 24 Mar 2014
In reply to alasdair19:

I'd have thought the best way to avoid injuries was getting the routes you're planning to solo pretty well dialled in.

jcm
highclimber - on 24 Mar 2014
In reply to alasdair19:

Listen to your body. It will tell you if something's going to break. We are all different and adapt at different paces. Do as much as you think you can do and gradually increase it as you see fit. All the 'no more than 10% increase in distance' is hyperbole and usually people can do much more than they think.
In vest in a descent pair of trail shoes (not road shoes), get outside and make like Forrest Gump - Run Forrest, Run!
Oh, and make sure to stretch/massage with foam roller after running. Makes a world of difference to achey muscles.
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Turdus torquatus on 24 Mar 2014
In reply to alasdair19:

I trained for the Nine Edges by adapting a training plan from one of Hal Higdon's marathon training books. Worked for me - I started training in the March from a base of running 15 miles a week. There's a kit list you need to carry in the event if you want an official placing, which is also handy kit for when you're training in nasty weather.

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