/ Aeropress

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Bimble on 19 Oct 2016
I received one of these little beauties for my birthday yesterday and have been meddling around with it to see what the best brew method for me is.

Anyone got any hints/tips as to how they use theirs for a perfect brew?
RyanOsborne - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Have you got a hand grinder to go with it? I've not got one myself but my brother brings one camping and makes excellent coffee in it. I think he's got this kind of grinder:

http://www.hario.co.uk/ceramic-mini-mill.html?gclid=CjwKEAjws5zABRDqkoOniLqfywESJACjdoiG4mKoBabrn2ef...

mike123 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to RyanOsborne:
Yep hand grinder , grind fresh every time if you can. Freshly roasted beans if you can get hold of them , lots available online now but try to find something locally . Some of the supermarket beans are excellent too . Sainsburies taste the difference Colombian being one. Lots of coffee w@nkery spouted , it's harmless enough but easy to get sucked in and believe it. Japanese hand grinder made by sensi koetsu in a cave in the mountains ...£300 ......suits you sir . If you find you are using it a lot get an electric grinder - burr grinders are best, nothing too expensive needed for an aeropress but it won't be any good if you decide to get an espresso machine . Temperature of the water is also very important ...leave the kettle to go off the boil for a few minutes then pour on a small amount to Let the grounds coffee swell, pour the rest of the water on slowly . If you don't have a grinder then booths, if you up north , still have them in the shop to grind your own .
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mike123:

What is coffee w@nkery if not this?

"Japanese hand grinder made by sensi koetsu in a cave in the mountains ...£300 ......suits you sir . If you find you are using it a lot get an electric grinder - burr grinders are best, nothing too expensive needed for an aeropress but it won't be any good if you decide to get an espresso machine . Temperature of the water is also very important ...leave the kettle to go off the boil for a few minutes then pour on a small amount to Let the grounds coffee swell, pour the rest of the water on slowly ."

;-)
knighty - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I brew inverted so that under brewed coffee doesn't drip out. Other than that, general hints are that you are good to reuse the filters a few times, don't scrimp on the amount of coffee you use and make sure it is a fine espresso grade grind (or marginally coarser). I have found that Taylors ground coffee is great in a filter, but too coarse for the aeropress. For pre ground, lavazza is the way forward.
1
mike123 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:
Exactly ! That was the point. Its harmless enough. You forget your irony specs this morning . ;)
And yes ...I have far too much time on my hands ...half my luck aye .
Post edited at 10:03
mangoletse - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

My coffee tastes are not particularly sophisticated, and we now have a Nespresso machine which is my benchmark - as long as it tastes good and the same every time, I'm happy.

With my aeropress, particularly for camping, I always found the paper filters a PITA for getting wet and blowing away etc. I bought a thing (that was highly recommended on a coffee geek forum when I was researching the Nespresso) from Kickstarter - a permanent stainless filter. It certainly works.

Although I got it on kickstarter I just googled 'aeropress stainless filter' and see loads, £3.99 on ebay for example. Whether it's worth using I don't really know but won't break the bank to try.
1
Ramblin dave - on 19 Oct 2016
Murderous_Crow - on 19 Oct 2016
I'm probably a coffee w**ker. But for me it's actually pretty simple. I like good coffee, and Iím prepared to spend a little time and effort to get it as good as possible. To that end, things needed are:

- Freshly roasted and freshly ground coffee (roasted within two weeks, ground within a few minutes)
- A decent brew method (espresso is not the holy grail, despite its expense and faff)
- A bit of time and care finding out what works Ė dose, temperature, brew time

Because of diminishing returns, most people are reasonably content with something that just tastes of coffee and contains a decent amount of caffeine. Iím guessing thatís not you, as youíve asked how to get the best from your (excellent) brew method. If you apply the above points, you can have genuinely world-class coffee, with very little fuss, once you know whatís what

Other things:

- Sorry to the above poster: supermarket coffee is crap. Even if it tastes vaguely OK (rare, in my experience), itís been produced with minimal attention to ethics or fair pricing to the farmer, and will have been roasted months ago. Avoid

- Accurate dosing and accurate temperature control *do* make it possible to consistently make an excellent brew

- Good hand grinders (which do seem to be Japanese, or at least use Japan-produced ceramic burrs) are not expensive. Porlex, Hario, Rhinowares are available for like £40, and out-perform my £350 electric grinder in terms of quality

- Agree with Knighty in that inverted brewing is a good tip for aeropress, and filters can be reused. I pre-soak A good steel mesh filter can be obtained for cheap from Amazon, improves the taste

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Purposefull-Filter-Aeropress-Stainless-Natural/dp/B00UAJT5EI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=...
8
JoshOvki on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

If you take it camping make sure you have spare filters. Recently in North Wales my kit bag was stolen, luckly the aeropress + coffee were in the porch not the bag. Unfortinutally my filters were in my kit bag, suddenly no coffee! The next morning I had a sudden memory of putting filters in the bag for my stove which was also in the poarch. Disaster averted! (although I was still missing a load of kit)
SenzuBean - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Most good tips already covered so far. A few more:

- To avoid waiting for the kettle water to cool down, add into the kettle approximately 1/10th of the volume of the boiled water, of cold water. (you're aiming for the water to be 91 degrees, once it's boiled it's approximately 99 degrees. Tap water is about 13 degrees. Thus:
91(Vk + Vt) = 99*Vk + 13*Vt
91*Vk + 78*Vt = 99*Vk
78*Vt = 8*Vk
Vt = 8*Vk/78, (or Vt = (T_boiling-T_ideal)*Vk/(T_ideal-T_tap) if you want to plug in different values)
Vt = 0.1*Vk (volume of tap water is 10% the volume of kettle water)

- In my experience slightly too cold brewing water is much tastier than slightly too hot - but you might find the opposite. Worth experimenting.

- Don't assume that fancy coffee shops will sell you the tastiest coffee. What's "all the rage" might just not be what you're after. All of the the hip coffee I've tried (even when I specifically ask for the least bitter they have) is too sour and bitter, whereas I prefer a more smooth and chocolatey Italian blend that's more traditional. Even starbucks is getting in on the trend with their new "blond bean" offerings.

- Make sure the cup is sparkling clean. Any proteins/fats stuck to the side (for example if you've had any milk in there before and it wasn't fully washed off) will scavenge parts of the taste profile, and leave you with a worse brew.
2
RyanOsborne - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to SenzuBean:

> Most good tips already covered so far. A few more:

> - To avoid waiting for the kettle water to cool down, add into the kettle approximately 1/10th of the volume of the boiled water, of cold water. (you're aiming for the water to be 91 degrees, once it's boiled it's approximately 99 degrees. Tap water is about 13 degrees. Thus:

> 91(Vk + Vt) = 99*Vk + 13*Vt

> 91*Vk + 78*Vt = 99*Vk

> 78*Vt = 8*Vk

> Vt = 8*Vk/78, (or Vt = (T_boiling-T_ideal)*Vk/(T_ideal-T_tap) if you want to plug in different values)

> Vt = 0.1*Vk (volume of tap water is 10% the volume of kettle water)

A scientific calculator and a team of nasa scientists are an essential part of making coffee ;-)

Maybe he could get a spectron microscope to ensure all the molecules are aligned correctly.
galpinos on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

My punter tips are:

- Inverted brew method
- Fresh whole beans freshly ground
- Don't panic too much about the water temp, just leave it for a bit.
- Pour a little on the grounds initially then add the rest slowly.

Enjoy, it makes a lovely cup

Extras
- Stainless steel filter is ideal for camping
- I've got a basic Hario hand grinder that I love but the only actual research into it show that people can't really tell the difference between burr and blade grinders as long as the beans are freshly roasted and ground.
- It might take a while to find a coffee/roast that you like. I swear by ManCoCo Manchester Blend. A lot of the "modern" roasts don't taste enough of "coffee" to. I'm wary of anything that sounds too fruity.
Bob Hughes - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

use this to get you started...

http://www.worldaeropresschampionship.com/recipes/

i always find they use too much coffee / too little water. I think there is a bias towards american taste in coffee. i find about 30g coffee and 80g waters suits me.
Jimbocz - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

> I'm probably a coffee w**ker. But for me it's actually pretty simple. I like good coffee, and Iím prepared to spend a little time and effort to get it as good as possible. To that end, things needed are:

> - Freshly roasted and freshly ground coffee (roasted within two weeks, ground within a few minutes)

> - A decent brew method (espresso is not the holy grail, despite its expense and faff)

> - A bit of time and care finding out what works Ė dose, temperature, brew time

> Because of diminishing returns, most people are reasonably content with something that just tastes of coffee and contains a decent amount of caffeine. Iím guessing thatís not you, as youíve asked how to get the best from your (excellent) brew method. If you apply the above points, you can have genuinely world-class coffee, with very little fuss, once you know whatís what

> Other things:

> - Sorry to the above poster: supermarket coffee is crap. Even if it tastes vaguely OK (rare, in my experience), itís been produced with minimal attention to ethics or fair pricing to the farmer, and will have been roasted months ago. Avoid

> - Accurate dosing and accurate temperature control *do* make it possible to consistently make an excellent brew

> - Good hand grinders (which do seem to be Japanese, or at least use Japan-produced ceramic burrs) are not expensive. Porlex, Hario, Rhinowares are available for like £40, and out-perform my £350 electric grinder in terms of quality

> - Agree with Knighty in that inverted brewing is a good tip for aeropress, and filters can be reused. I pre-soak A good steel mesh filter can be obtained for cheap from Amazon, improves the taste


IMHO, this poster is absolutely correct about supermarket beans. All of them will be no good. If you buy some freshly roasted beans from the HasBeans link above, or my favourite Rave Coffee, you will be able to taste the difference. Much more so if you grind them yourself with one of the grinders also listed.

Check out http://coffeeforums.co.uk/

They will have some suggestions for your aeropress.

SenzuBean - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to RyanOsborne:

> A scientific calculator and a team of nasa scientists are an essential part of making coffee ;-)

It was just high school maths! :p

> Maybe he could get a spectron microscope to ensure all the molecules are aligned correctly.

Now you're talking

Bimble on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Jimbocz:

It came with a bag of Rave's House Blend (Aeropress grind) which is blooming lovely. I'll be getting some of their beans and buying a Porlex Mini burr grinder next week.

Thanks for the other advice folks, much appreciated.
ian caton on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

They produce good coffee but not much. Stove top produces 400 ml of strong coffee from 18 gms of coffee, nearly as tasty as aeropress.

Good value beans are cafe Nero, but then I prefer some robusta in there. Pure arabica is over sold IMHO.
1
MonkeyPuzzle - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to SenzuBean:

> Even starbucks is getting in on the trend with their new "blond bean" offerings.

I'd be happy if they just started doing coffee that doesn't taste like it's had fags put out in it.
snoop6060 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I dunno about anyone else but it seems you need about twice the amount of coffee to match the strength of a moka pot with the aeropress. I guess the cofee wankery term is over extraction but I seem to rattle through some amount of coffee with an aeropress. Though I tend to favor it as its so quick to make one (and getting rid of the grounds is easy and tidy).

Other than that, wetting the filter first does seem to help with it leaking. The inverted method made me spill shit everywhere.
snoop6060 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Jimbocz:

> "IMHO, this poster is absolutely correct about supermarket beans. All of them will be no good"

I bought some coffee from lidl, already ground and it tasted nice. Oh the shame, I must have an unsophisticated palette. I should maybe stick to tea.
ripper - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to snoop6060:

. The inverted method made me spill shit everywhere.

I find a good strong coffee in the morning is required to 'get things moving' too....
Murderous_Crow - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to snoop6060:
> I bought some coffee from lidl, already ground and it tasted nice. Oh the shame, I must have an unsophisticated palette. I should maybe stick to tea.

I read that with a grin, as I tend to be a sarcastic bugger too. End of the day, most people have things they're fussy about, and other people slate them for that. If all you want is a half-decent brew, the coffee wankery doesn't matter does it.

P.S. could be worth trying a longer brew time and a finer grind. You can get pre-ground espresso, should be more flavoursome without having to put loads in
Post edited at 15:30
Glyno - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to ripper:

> . The inverted method made me spill shit everywhere.

I used to always use the Aeropress inverted, I don't anymore, I really don't think it makes any difference.

My tip - when it hisses, stop pressing.
Jimbocz - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to snoop6060:

The other day I climbed a particularly steep set of stairs. It was hard enough for me. Not sure why you guys keep talking about climbing all the time, there wasn't much to talk about and I didn't even need any equipment.
snoop6060 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Jimbocz:

If drinking coffee is your hobby then fair enough, no reason not to take it seriously and talk in depth about its finer points.
1
mac fae stirling - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I am interested in this whole Aeropress thing but I am not sure I can bothered with what seems like the extra faff.
My coffee snobbery extends to a dislike of instant coffee. I use a big old Bialetti stove top espresso maker.
Is the coffee that comes out of an areopress really so much better [anyone]? I like that the stove top gets hot so the coffee is nice and hot - is the coffee from an aeropress really hot or a bit lukewarm? Just wondering if I should take the plunge. So to speak.
snoop6060 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mac fae stirling:

Its as hot as the water you put in, which is supposed to be 80odd C which is hot enough.

The coffee is smoother than my stove top but not as strong so you need loads more coffee. Its alot quicker, especially if you happen to making someone a cup of tea. It takes about the same amount of time/effort.
mike123 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to snoop6060:
Well put.. It always amuses me that coffee wankery bothers some people on here , a forum devoted to a completly pointless hobby . Hold the presses , a subset of people who have a completly pointless hobby that they take seriously also have another one or two. Why look at a thread you know us going to annoy you? Ah look ... a coffee wankers thread ...great ..this should really spoil my tea break .
mac fae stirling - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to snoop6060:

Ok, that is interesting. Why is it not as strong as a stove top? Does a stove top force more flavour out of the coffee or something? Does this then mean it impairs the flavour/coffee a bit?

'Smoother' .. mmm.... I guess I will just have to give it a go.
TheDrunkenBakers - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Erm.

Mellow birds, boil, milk, sugar, hobnob.
mac fae stirling - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mike123:

> Well put.. It always amuses me that coffee wankery bothers some people on here , a forum devoted to a completly pointless hobby . Hold the presses , a subset of people who have a completly pointless hobby that they take seriously also have another one or two. Why look at a thread you know us going to annoy you? Ah look ... a coffee wankers thread ...great ..this should really spoil my tea break .

Ha! well put also. Similarly when people turn their nose up at Munro bagging, citing the utter pointlessness of it thus missing the point that its utter pointlessness is one of its key attractions. Not that I do it anymore you understand.
galpinos on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mac fae stirling:

You get more flavour and it is smoother than a stove top. I've got a Brikka and an Aeropress, use and like them both. The Brikka is a stronger, thicker, more full on tasting coffee, the Aeropress gives a thineer, smoother more delicate taste that you get more of the "other" flavours. For even more flavours, you can go to a pour-over/filter method but that starts tasting less and less like coffee to me so not really my thing.

Camping/van-ing I don't take the stove top, just the Aeropress
mac fae stirling - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to galpinos:

> You get more flavour and it is smoother than a stove top. I've got a Brikka and an Aeropress, use and like them both. The Brikka is a stronger, thicker, more full on tasting coffee, the Aeropress gives a thineer, smoother more delicate taste that you get more of the "other" flavours. For even more flavours, you can go to a pour-over/filter method but that starts tasting less and less like coffee to me so not really my thing.

> Camping/van-ing I don't take the stove top, just the Aeropress

OK thanks - maybe having both and varying it is the way forward then.
Jimbocz - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I'm all up for using an aeropress if you like espresso, but I prefer milky drinks like a cappuccino. I'd be lost without my milk steamer. Don't be afraid to admit that you'd like that as well and go and buy a Sage or an old Gaggia
mac fae stirling - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

> Erm.

> Mellow birds, boil, milk, sugar, hobnob.

Now you are talking! What was I thinking of?!
CurlyStevo - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Jimbocz:
> IMHO, this poster is absolutely correct about supermarket beans. All of them will be no good. If you buy some freshly roasted beans from the HasBeans link above, or my favourite Rave Coffee, you will be able to taste the difference. Much more so if you grind them yourself with one of the grinders also listed.


> They will have some suggestions for your aeropress.

I wouldn't go that far I go in and out of phases of buying HasBean. Sometimes they are much better other times much of a muchness tbh.

The waitrose kenya aa beans cost about half the price but are a lot better than half as good as HasBean average and make a nice cup.

On a sub point I've tried an aero press quite a few times and I think if you use the same grind and timings (stirring, sitting etc) there really isn't much difference. Its nothing like an espresso machine or as different as an Italian stove top jobby. Fundamentally the way it works is similar to French press, ie mix the coffee and water together, wait and then filter out the coffee, its not working under the principle of a compartment of dry packed coffee you force water through under pressure. I guess it has less sludge at the bottom of the cup.
Post edited at 16:31
mike123 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mac fae stirling:
Stove top vs aero press ? Use both and at various times both have been my main source of coffee . The thing with stove top is it's very easy to make and it turns out the same every time , use the same ground coffee and you get the same drink . Seems to work really well with the common super market brands in Spain and Italy . I think if I had just one simple way of making a brew ( I'm ruling out ridiculously expensive espresso machine and grinder ) it would be stove top because of the simplicity and reliability . Aero press makes smoother coffee because of the filter paper , I think taking out bitter oils . It does however require level 3 wankery to get it really good . I tried the inversion thing and just ended up with coffee all over the place , I also ended up with coffee all over the place several time trying to use an aero press in a rush . Small change in water temp seem to make a big difference . One day you hit the sweet spot another you think you ve changed nothing and the brew is "only " 8/10 . Great looking piece of kit as well that people who don't really know about such things like to mistake for a bong . Stupid person at work : "Is that for smoking drugs? "
Me : " yes .would you like to try?"
Post edited at 18:10
Sealwife - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mike123:

> Great looking piece of kit ass well that people who don't really know about such things like to mistake for a bong . Stupid person at work : "Is that for smoking drugs? "

> Me : " yes .would you like to try?"

I had to explain my aeropress at airport security.

mac fae stirling - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mike123:

Ta for that. In the morning we need 2 or 3 mugs of coffee in a hurry, so I think I will stick with stove top for now.
Maybe an aeropress for a chrissie present to see what I am missing.
Bimble on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I've tried both inverted and non-inverted throughout today at work (the cookery teacher & I geeked out at lunchtime with it) and I much prefer the former. I've not managed to splatter everything with coffee, and it seems to make a very smooth yet tasty cuppa.

I've also tried it with Lidl's Guatemalan ground coffee that I've got for work use and it's still lovely with that.
captain paranoia - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mangoletse:

> and we now have a Nespresso machine which is my benchmark

https://pchipsta.tumblr.com/post/126572017202

Actually, I couldn't give a monkeys' about coffee; I drink Lidl instant decaff...
Bimble on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to captain paranoia:


> Actually, I couldn't give a monkeys' about coffee; I drink Lidl instant decaff....

*vomits in mouth*
Hooo - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to mac fae stirling:

I've spent some time messing with an Aeropress, and I've gone back to my stove top for when I'm away from home. I just prefer the full strength old school Italian espresso style, and the Aeropress is a bit delicate and subtle for me.
mac fae stirling - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Hooo:

> I've spent some time messing with an Aeropress, and I've gone back to my stove top for when I'm away from home. I just prefer the full strength old school Italian espresso style, and the Aeropress is a bit delicate and subtle for me.

Noted. The old stove top looks great too.
Bimble on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Hooo:

I've got a much-loved stove top espresso pot and while I like how it kick starts my heart in the morning with a triple espresso, it is a little too robust for later in the day.
After having a few too many mouthfuls of bits and scalded hands after plunger malfunctions, I've given up completely on French presses.
captain paranoia - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

> *vomits in mouth*

I guess everyone's tastes are different.

I tend to try to make sure vomit comes out of my mouth as fast as possible; I don't like the taste...
Glyno - on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to captain paranoia:



> Actually, I couldn't give a monkeys' about coffee

...but you couldn't resist a thread titled 'Aeropress'
Indy - on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Chuck it in the bin.... nasty thing.
mike123 - on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:
well done.
I ve being trying for ages to describe the subtle nuances of the Starbucks blend and never come as close as that.

ads.ukclimbing.com
cousin nick - on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I got an Aeropress and a Rhinowares hand grinder for my birthday.
My preferences are:
Freshly roasted beans - I'm lucky in that we have a local deli that supplies these. I've tried lots, but currently favour their Colombian dark roast, which are really oily.
Grind as fine as you can, and for my taste, use more beans than you think you need.
I use the inverted method, brew for 3 mins with occasional stir, filter into pre-warmed mug.

Aeropress is my personal 'coffee w*&nker' indulgence. For all other times when its more than just me, I revert to the French press (but still use freshly ground deli beans).

I suppose my tea equivalent is leaf tea, not bags, but that opens a whole other can 'o worms ;-)

N
Jim C - on 20 Oct 2016
aln - on 21 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I love coffee, I love fresh coffee, but there is so much coffee w@nkery. It'd be fun to see the people who spout it doing blind tastings, see how much difference they can tell between fresh ground, different beans etc.
Murderous_Crow - on 21 Oct 2016
In reply to aln:

Goodness me it's a bit sad how people trash one another's interests. It's just a hobby so it's not harming anyone, but why not take the time to do some research before deciding that the subject is simply 'wankery'?

The process of 'cupping' is exactly what you describe, and it's a key part of good coffee production. It's increasingly something informed consumers are doing too:

https://www.hasbean.co.uk/blogs/articles/6488501-coffee-cupping-a-basic-introduction

Cheers

Luke
aln - on 21 Oct 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

> Goodness me it's a bit sad how people trash one another's interests.

I'm 'trashing' others interests? Don't be daft.

why not take the time to do some research before deciding that the subject is simply 'wankery'?

How do you know I haven't?
2
sebastian dangerfield on 21 Oct 2016
In reply to mangoletse:

> My coffee tastes are not particularly sophisticated, and we now have a Nespresso machine which is my benchmark - as long as it tastes good and the same every time, I'm happy.

Setting the bar low there! ;-)
galpinos on 21 Oct 2016
In reply to aln:

I seem to remember there being some research done and that people could definitely tell if its was freshly ground beans or pre-ground but not if it was ground with a burr (good) or blade (bad - apparently heats the grounds up too much?) grinder.

Having blind tasted friends they could tell between french press and Aeropress (same coffee but I may have put more effort into the Aeropress as I prefer it!) and between pre-ground and freshly ground (same coffee, same method).

That doesn't prove any method is "better", but one can tell the difference. Whether the difference is worth the effort is a "discussion" my wife and I have most weekends whilst I'm hand grinding beans and she's trying to dress the kids and get them to eat breakfast before we all pile out of the house.
CurlyStevo - on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to galpinos:

try making the French press with the same grind, the same stirring and sitting time before you plunge as the aero press. I reckon then there isn't much difference except the aeropress is filtered so no grounds in the last bit of the cup.
galpinos on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to CurlyStevo:

Iím not sure I can subject them to my coffee wankery again. I use a French Press, Aeropress and stove top multiple times a week and still prefer the Aeropress with French Press a definite third. I DO think the coffee tastes better but Iím aware that might be an internal bias, however, if I think it tastes better, it does!

(Iíve written that whilst drinking a coffee from a French pressÖ.)
Fredt on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Reminds me of when my daughter went to shop in New York as she had seen a cafetiŤre in the window.

Daughter, I'd like to buy a cafetiŤre please.
Assistant - Blank look
Daughter - A cafetiŤre?
Assistant - Blank look.
Daughter - You have one in the window - takes assistant outside to show them
Assistant, Oh, you mean a French Press!
Daughter - in the UK we call them cafetiŤres
Assistant - well we like to respect and acknowledge the French who invented it, so we use the French name.

Dax H - on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Seems there is a lot goes in to making a good coffee.
Not a coffee drinker myself I prefer tea but the skills are transferable between both types of drink.
It's really easy.
You wait for the wife or girlfriend to get up and ask her to sort a brew out whilst she is up.
A brew made by someone else follows the same rule as someone else's chip's, always superior to one you make yourself.
Lemony - on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Fredt:

> Assistant - well we like to respect and acknowledge the French who invented it, so we use the French name.

Even worse since it was invented by an Italian.
Fredt on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Lemony:

> Even worse since it was invented by an Italian.

I'll give you that, but I believe it was first manufactured in France, by a French company

galpinos on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Lemony:

> Even worse since it was invented by an Italian.

Patented by him, but was in use prior to this (to be pedantic).
spamo on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Not to try and hijack the post (I will definitely by buying an aeropress and trying the tips) however what is with 90% of coffee shops serving me a BOILING black coffee?!

Not only does it taste like crap, I have to wait for 10/15 mins (having finished my cake by that point) to find out that fact!
Bimble on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I think I've got my personal recipe for it sorted now.

Inverted brewing, with one heaped scoop of ground beans in there. Water just off boiling, leave for 2 minutes to brew up before pressing. Hot local full-fat milk, 1 sugar. Lovely.
1
Fredt on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

Hilarious, - I was believing you all the way until you said sugar!
felt - on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to CurlyStevo:

> I reckon then there isn't much difference except the aeropress is filtered so no grounds in the last bit of the cup.

I've had two Aeropresses, with both paper and metal filters, and would love to believe the hype around them but I think you're spot on. In fact I think I prefer a French press as you get that creamy stuff (not exactly crema) right at the end of the pour. That said, the AP is great for lightweight camping, except when everyone wants a coffee.
Sealwife - on 24 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I have had aeropress, stove top pot and french press. I like all three. Mostly I use the aeropress because I haven't accidentally smashed the glass beaker (again) whilst washing it, and other half has nicked the stove top for use on his boat as it's more stable on the swinging gas stove than an aeropress is balanced on a mug.

Will need to get a replacement french press (when did they stop being cafetieres) though, as aeropress are a pain for making more than one cup.
Bulls Crack - on 25 Oct 2016
In reply to Sealwife:

So aeropresses are basically just small cafetieres?
Steve Perry - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to mike123:

> Yep hand grinder , grind fresh every time if you can. Freshly roasted beans if you can get hold of them , lots available online now but try to find something locally . Some of the supermarket beans are excellent too . Sainsburies taste the difference Colombian being one. Lots of coffee w@nkery spouted , it's harmless enough but easy to get sucked in and believe it. Japanese hand grinder made by sensi koetsu in a cave in the mountains ...£300 ......suits you sir . If you find you are using it a lot get an electric grinder - burr grinders are best, nothing too expensive needed for an aeropress but it won't be any good if you decide to get an espresso machine . Temperature of the water is also very important ...leave the kettle to go off the boil for a few minutes then pour on a small amount to Let the grounds coffee swell, pour the rest of the water on slowly . If you don't have a grinder then booths, if you up north , still have them in the shop to grind your own .

I'd love to hear you spouting that crap in a portakabin full of hairy arse navvies at 7am on a Monday morning.
2
mike123 - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:
I'm guessing when you bought your new bed you asked for the one with two wrong sides ?
2
MonkeyPuzzle - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

> I'd love to hear you spouting that crap in a portakabin full of hairy arse navvies at 7am on a Monday morning.

Because that is the yardstick by which we all measure our opinions and interests.
Steve Perry - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to mike123: Tea drinkers strike back

Bimble on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

At 7am on a Monday morning, I'm ensconced in my kitchen, having my 2nd cup of coffee and contemplating going to work. No navvies, fortunately.
PeterM - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

> Because that is the yardstick by which we all measure our opinions and interests.

no, but it would be funny AF to see and hear their reaction...
MonkeyPuzzle - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to PeterM:

Depends if any of them asked, like the OP did.
tom r - on 26 Oct 2016
In reply to Bimble:
I think they are quite over rated, I have had one for a couple of years. It uses a lot of coffee unless you do the upside down method. I think most of the supposed superior taste is due to the recommended lower temperature of the water. My tip is to be buy a fancy kettle that can heat water to different temperatures.
Post edited at 14:11

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