/ Anyone Paint Sprayed Their Ice Axes, or Know About Spraying?

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Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
I was after some advice about spraying. I've sanded down, cleaned with white spirit and applied 2 coats of grey primer. I then sanded down (1200 grit) and applied my colour, sanded down again (1200 grit) and applied a second coat which looks great. According to advice now I need to sand to a matt finish (1200 grit) and apply lacquer but I'm worried I won't get the shine I'm at now pre-lacquer. Are my worries unfounded? I know the lacquer will be more durable than just a few coats of paint but it kills me to sand the finish I have to matt finish.
Fiona Reid - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:
Can't help with the painting but what colour are they going to be ?
Post edited at 12:33
Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Fiona Reid:

Orange
Fiona Reid - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

I'd have gone with luminous green but then that would match your helmet and that would never do... can't have matching colours these days...

Mr K (on UKC) has luminous pink ones but I think he got them coated with some kind of resin rather than paint IIRC - we had lot of time to chat when queuing on The Runnel a few winters back.
Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Fiona Reid: I have a spare orange helmet if needed.

wee jamie on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

You do realise, the first sniff of rock and the paint's coming off. Or are they for show only?
I've painted a few axes but never spent too much time on preparation and finish, but your methods seem fine.
Not sure what paint you're using, but make sure the lacquer doesn't react to the paint - do a test area first.

Make sure you stick a photo up here when you're done!
MrJared - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

Not spray painted ice axes but I have done the rims for a car. If you want a good shine the lacqeur will do this much better than the paint alone. The reason to sand again is so that the lacquer will stick to the paint work.

Also when you have lacquered them you can buff them up to get an even better shine.
Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to wee jamie:

The paint and lacquer shouldn't react, they're the same make.
They're not for show and I expect them to get scratched but they were scratched anyway as I'd been using them a few years.

Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to MrJared:

Cheers for that. Yes, I guessed it's part of the bonding process to get the lacquer to stick so I'll get on with it and good it turns out ok.
What did you use for buffing afterwards?
MrJared - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

This explains The process:

http://m.wikihow.com/Buff-Clear-Coat

Obviously using a buffer is not practical but you can do it by hand!
Dell on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

2 coats and lacquer on an ice axe! I'm sure banger racers don't give their cars that much love and attention.
gethin_allen on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

I painted some Ice axes which were looking rather passed their best and it was a total waste of time. The first time you hit a rock a chips off badly and looks terrible so unless you plan on hanging them on your wall rather than using them you're efforts will probably be in vein. In the end I wrapped my axes in electrical tape which looks fine and adds some insulation for when you're holding them up near the heads for climbing easy snow slopes.
Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to gethin_allen:

> I painted some Ice axes which were looking rather passed their best and it was a total waste of time.

Ah well, did you lacquer them etc?

gethin_allen on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

I'll admit to not doing the best job with them, there were a a few paint runs and I probably should have given them extra coats, but I'm not convinced it would have made a lot of difference.
Considering what you are doing with them is it that important that they look perfect?
MarkJH - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

> Ah well, did you lacquer them etc?

A 2-part paint is probably the only way to go if you want the finish to be chip/ scratch resistant.
thedatastream on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to gethin_allen:

> ... In the end I wrapped my axes in electrical tape ...

I can recommend self amalgamating tape - grippier and more robust than normal insulting tape

gethin_allen on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to thedatastream:

I tried that and the two axes self amalgamated while in storage, oops.
Dave Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

Does it matter? They're just axes! ;-)
Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Dave Perry:

No it doesn't matter at all, but I've time on my hands so why not?
captain paranoia - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

Assuming they're aluminium shafts, have you used an aluminium etch primer...? (Ponders the effect of etch on PPE...)

1200 grit wet and dry is the realm of concours car paint finishes. As other have said, at first contact, your lovely paintwork is going to get trashed... I'm an obsessive perfectionist, and even I'd simply have given them a wipe, masked of the head and tip, and got a can of spray paint and given it a single coat... Orange peel be damned...
Steve Perry - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to captain paranoia:
> Assuming they're aluminium shafts, have you used an aluminium etch primer...? (Ponders the effect of etch on PPE...)

Nope

> 1200 grit wet and dry is the realm of concours car paint finishes. As other have said, at first contact, your lovely paintwork is going to get trashed... I'm an obsessive perfectionist, and even I'd simply have given them a wipe, masked of the head and tip, and got a can of spray paint and given it a single coat... Orange peel be damned...

Not that much of a perfectionist then
Post edited at 19:31
Phil Payne - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

No, but for a really nice finish, you should try hydro dipping. Loads of videos on youtube showing you how to do it and you could have a really nice pattern instead of just a single plain colour.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhAeFZVF53c
Sophie G. - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

I still think you should have gone for pink, Mr P
Babika - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Sophie G.:

I have some original shocking pink ones in the garage.....circa 1986. All the rage then.
Steve Perry - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Sophie G.: That's what Sarah said, I just couldn't

wercat on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

I wonder if Plasti Dip would work - they have some great 80s style luminous/fluorescent colours
planetmarshall on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to wercat:

It does, yes - though painted onto grip tape rather than directly onto the tool. It was popular among competitors on the Dry Tooling circuit a couple of years ago, these days Stixall appears to be the latest thing.
Master of Ice on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to planetmarshall:
I knew I should've patented my idea 😉
dek - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Master of Ice:

> I knew I should've patented my idea 😉

So what happens? Do you paint it on to get a tacky grip effect, when it dries in, or something?
ads.ukclimbing.com
Goucho on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Steve Perry:

> I was after some advice about spraying. I've sanded down, cleaned with white spirit and applied 2 coats of grey primer. I then sanded down (1200 grit) and applied my colour, sanded down again (1200 grit) and applied a second coat which looks great. According to advice now I need to sand to a matt finish (1200 grit) and apply lacquer but I'm worried I won't get the shine I'm at now pre-lacquer. Are my worries unfounded? I know the lacquer will be more durable than just a few coats of paint but it kills me to sand the finish I have to matt finish.

I once referbished an ancient McKinness Peck metal shafted axe with 2 rolls of red electricians tape.
dek - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Goucho:

I've a pair of Forrest, Serac Sabres, remember them? They came finished in a lovely Blue plastic coating, it only lasted a couple of good weekends, before they looked like overgrown Terrors!
Goucho on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to dek:
> I've a pair of Forrest, Serac Sabres, remember them? They came finished in a lovely Blue plastic coating, it only lasted a couple of good weekends, before they looked like overgrown Terrors!

Don't recall those, but I remember the rubber grips on Terror's started perishing about five minutes after you took them out of a car boot

But you could get them to last a full day, if you put gaffa tape around where the rubber grips met the shafts.
Post edited at 12:28
dek - on 12:37 Thu
In reply to Goucho:

You had 'rubber' ?!...oh the joy of midweek nights spent, trying to persuade the inner tube rubber, onto the terror shaft, with araldite and tape....only for it to fall off, at first sight of a corrie!
Goucho on 12:52 Thu
In reply to dek:

> You had 'rubber' ?!...oh the joy of midweek nights spent, trying to persuade the inner tube rubber, onto the terror shaft, with araldite and tape....only for it to fall off, at first sight of a corrie!

And of course there were those leashes made from Orange trawler netting, designed with millimetre precision to rub on that gap between glove and sleeve
dek - on 13:06 Thu
In reply to Goucho:

> And of course there were those leashes made from Orange trawler netting, designed with millimetre precision to rub on that gap between glove and sleeve

Oh yeah....that polyprop circulation stopper?! You could 'Hang an Elephant' off that, apparently!

I'm now getting all nostalgic, for the Alpine Sports, store card....you would see Glasgows poorest climbers, walking out the shop, with exotic American ice tools, patagonia synchilla tops, and clunky double boots! ....no wonder the retailer went bust!
Master of Ice on 15:54 Thu
In reply to dek: I went from using plasti dip to using stixall. It's a grab adhesive that once sets is similar to the rubber on the grivel masters/force grip. As it bonds to the shaft of the tools repairing any damage is easy

dek - on 16:00 Thu
In reply to Master of Ice:

> I went from using plasti dip to using stixall. It's a grab adhesive that once sets is similar to the rubber on the grivel masters/force grip. As it bonds to the shaft of the tools repairing any damage is easy

Thanks for that, any tips on how much to use per tool?
Master of Ice on 16:02 Thu
In reply to dek:
Message me your email and I'll send you some photos etc
French Erick - on 16:19 Thu
In reply to Master of Ice:

actually could you upload them on here? I'm curious
dek - on 16:53 Thu
In reply to Master of Ice:

That looks quite good! Do you need to tape the shaft before applying the adhesive, or go just straight into the metal?

What's the handgrip like, on that Grivel, looks nice and roomy, for a big gloved hand?!
Steve Perry - on 17:18 Thu
In reply to Goucho:

> I once referbished an ancient McKinness Peck metal shafted axe with 2 rolls of red electricians tape.

Surely not 2!!
Goucho on 18:06 Thu
In reply to Steve Perry:

> Surely not 2!!

Yep. I was trying to insulate the metal a bit better too.

It was a crap idea, and I ended up throwing it away shortly after it let me down on Chaos Chimney.
Master of Ice on 19:39 Thu
In reply to dek: no you can go direct on the shaft.

The grip on the grivel is medium sized I'd say. I can only use with gloves like OR alibis. Struggle with thicker gloves

dek - on 20:38 Thu
In reply to Master of Ice:

> no you can go direct on the shaft.

> The grip on the grivel is medium sized I'd say. I can only use with gloves like OR alibis. Struggle with thicker gloves

Good info, will give if a try at the weekend.
Thanks very much!
Master of Ice on 20:40 Thu
In reply to dek:
Only go for the black. That seems to set more like rubber than the other colours
dek - on 20:50 Thu
In reply to Master of Ice:

> Only go for the black. That seems to set more like rubber than the other colours

Will do, sounds much easier than fannying around with tape etc, thanks again!
wercat on 21:13 Thu
In reply to Master of Ice:

very useful bit of information.
Master of Ice on 21:33 Thu
In reply to dek:
So much better than tape. Lasts longer. Better grip.
browndog33 - on 21:45 Fri
In reply to Steve Perry:

Yes, sand paint to matt finish before lacquering, I know it seems counterintuitive to sand that lovey gloss paintwork back to matt finish before lacquering but don't worry as the (even more lovely) gloss finish will return when lacquered!
Steve Perry - on 22:01 Fri
In reply to browndog33:

Yes I did, it turned out pretty good thanks.

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