/ Portable therapeutic Ultrasound Machine

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Bjartur i Sumarhus on 16:24 Fri
Anyone used one of these for injury treatment, specifically tendon or muscle injuries? Any success or a waste of money? I am tempted to treat a stubborn tendonitis issue I have rather than spend on physio (which i have done with zero success)

Something like this..

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Homecare-Therapeutic-Ultrasound-Machine-Pulsed-Continuous/dp/B00SJHI3FA/ref...

My attitude is what harm can it do, and if it doesn't work then fleabay will get another item to sell.

SenzuBean - on 16:38 Fri
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

They don't tell you at all (as far as I can tell) give the power output (so it might actually be very weak, and do almost nothing). Considering it's a consumer product, I suspect this is the case.
That, combined with claims such as "cellulite reduction" (if it can destroy collagen, then it can destroy capillaries too) would ring bells in my head that it's a waste of money.
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 16:45 Fri
In reply to SenzuBean:

Thx, what is the power output that would be ideal for a machine to treat an ankle tendon at 3mhz? Not looking to knock out kidney stones or remove tooth plaque here ;-)
Dave the Rave on 16:47 Fri
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:
If you're set on getting i,t Google Tim Watsons homepage for all settings.
However, the evidence surrounding electrotherapy is quite poor.
What are you trying to treat?
Post edited at 16:53
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SenzuBean - on 17:12 Fri
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

> Thx, what is the power output that would be ideal for a machine to treat an ankle tendon at 3mhz? Not looking to knock out kidney stones or remove tooth plaque here ;-)

I wouldn't know. Somewhere in the ballpark of 1 to 10W would be my guess. My main thought is that by them not providing their wattage - they are hiding something, and that is likely to be that it's very weak.

Scientific evidence for therapeutic ultrasound is also fairly flimsy apparently - and that's likely in reference to clinical machines rather than consumer models.

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