/ jogging beginner what shoes?

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colina - on 24 Jun 2013
thought id do a little jogging ,more for keeping flexible and gaining some stamina for hill climbing,looking at maybe getting out 3x a week doing no more than a couple of miles initially as I don't want to lose any weight.I have a budget of about 50 ,anyone got any advice and reccomendations for some running shoes.thankyou
Camm - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:
Go to a running shop where they put you on a treadmill, get the ones that fit the best and forget the price tag.
Ciro - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:

It's been shown that the fancy "technology" in running shoes makes no difference to injury rates, so just go with whatever feels comfortable within your budget. Or go barefoot and spend the 50 on a new cam ;)
rmt - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to Ciro:
> (In reply to colina)
>
> It's been shown that the fancy "technology" in running shoes makes no difference to injury rates, so just go with whatever feels comfortable within your budget. Or go barefoot and spend the 50 on a new cam ;)

It's also been shown that running in shoes designed for 'supinators' if you're a pronator, or vice versa, can significantly increase your chance of getting shin splints and other such lower leg discomfort making running impossible. In my experience the advice to get a video assessment is very good, and totally transformed my ability to run without discomfort. No need for the latest 'technology', I agree, but pay a bit to get shoes that are right for you. It's worth it.

Antigua - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to Ciro:
> (In reply to colina)
>
> It's been shown that the fancy "technology" in running shoes makes no difference to injury rates
Running on the treadmill and getting advice based on the results for a shoe in your budget range is a free service so it would seem rather churlish to decline or avoid it.

tom_in_edinburgh - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:

If you've got a reasonable pair of trainers just use them for a few weeks until you see if you actually like running and have gained a bit of balance and stamina.

You'll probably get better advice and more useful measurements if they've got a treadmill at that point than you would going in before you start running.

Or you could just get some Nike Air Pegasus off Amazon :-)

felt - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to Antigua:
> (In reply to Ciro)
> [...]
> Running on the treadmill and getting advice based on the results for a shoe in your budget range is a free service so it would seem rather churlish to decline or avoid it.

Yes, up to a point, but the shop I was videoed in made it clear that I'd really better buy some of their shoes if I did the treadmill/video thing. Fair enough in one sense, as they must be tired of people using their technology, getting their informed opinion and then leaving the shop empty-handed and buying the pair -- that they were advised to get -- cheaper online. On the other hand, it's never nice being pressured in a retail situation.

Another difficult situation thrown up by our delightful Internet age!
UKC Forums - on 24 Jun 2013
This thread was started in the ROCKTALK forum and has now been moved.
Please could you try and post in the correct forum, it makes life easier for both users and moderators.

Running - Everything to do with running be it trail running, fell running and road running. Gear, techniques, great runs you have done - this is the place for all that.

More Forum descriptions - http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/info/forums.html
IainRUK - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to felt:
> (In reply to Antigua)
> [...]
>
> Yes, up to a point, but the shop I was videoed in made it clear that I'd really better buy some of their shoes if I did the treadmill/video thing. Fair enough in one sense, as they must be tired of people using their technology, getting their informed opinion and then leaving the shop empty-handed and buying the pair -- that they were advised to get -- cheaper online. On the other hand, it's never nice being pressured in a retail situation.
>
> Another difficult situation thrown up by our delightful Internet age!

Not smart by them but understandable.

In the UK though I think running shops are behind the attitude in the US. In the US the shop is the running community, its the UK equivalent of a club. You'd have cheap nights, you'd meet at the shop, have BBQ's out the back..

Such a simple idea.

Some UK shops are going that way but generating that sort of loyalty is the way to do it. In the summer 50-60 runners will meet at the local shop I use in Philly..

In Germany I get a good discount, the shop pays my entry fees, I run for his team, I even get free gear thrown in sometimes, so I'll shop there from now on.
Bob kate bob on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to Ciro: I couldn't walk for weeks without shooting pain in my feet.

This was in part due to incorrect running shoes, so yea you must be right everyone can run any sort of trainer and they will be perfectly fine...
...NOT.

michaelc - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:
I thought I read here a while ago that a lot of the shop-fitting stuff (video etc.,) was more voodoo and theatre than anything else?

Probably no harm, so long as you pay attention to whether or not the shoes are comfortable and how they fit you (and having a treadmill at the shop to test running on them is a good thing in that regard).

In any case, voodoo or no, I settled on the running shoes that work for me after a shop-fitting session in Germany. Have repeat purchased the same shoe after that on the internet (picking up remaindered stock to get a good price and ensure they are exactly the same shoe). Best help I got was the assistant knowing the fits&features of the various brands/models (which ones had narrow heels, wide toe-box, stiffer/softer sole, etc.,)
IainRUK - on 24 Jun 2013
In reply to michaelc: I don't know.. I think there is a lot of 'expertise' which is just a days training..

To be honest if you walk in a shop they should just look at your shoes.. my trainers are all worn identically. Its so clear where I strike. They could use a treadmill.. camera.. but my shoes are pretty clear.

Some are great but I do get the hard push to run on the treadmill.. and I'm after the 8th pair.. of the same shoe.. which I've ran consistently in for 90 mile weeks without the slightest injury... I just find it strange how they will then want me to try other shoes... why gamble..
colina - on 26 Jun 2013
In reply to IainRUK: ok 90 mile a week is a good indication that your shoes are up 4 the job.
wot shoes do you run in ian?
IainRUK - on 26 Jun 2013
In reply to colina: Adidas adizero's adios.. I'm just in love with them. I use them for everything from European mountain running, trail running to road. Just a brilliant shoe.

https://www.google.de/search?q=adidas+adizero+adios&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.48340889,d...

But there are many great trainers around. Asics, Saucony, Brooks, Adidas, Mizuno's.. too many to mention which make perfectly suitable trainers. Do try and find out if you have are neutral/pronate etc then try some shoes.
IainRUK - on 26 Jun 2013
In reply to IainRUK: I've gone progressively more neutral. And much prefer a semi-racing shoe like the Adios for general training, although you lose some durability. I'll still hit 500 miles or so.
colina - on 26 Jun 2013
In reply to ianruk:
>
went to sports soccer jjb sports yesterday and actually bought a pair of karrimor shoes which in all honesty didn't feel too bad jogging yesterday ,however after reading up on karrimors trainers not sure whether I made the right purchase so am considering taking them back tonite.

wondering if its worth spending the xtra money and get a good branded shoe



do you mean there are purpose built shoes for neutral and pronate runners?
sebastian74 - on 26 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:
I've done exactly the same; got cheap Karrimors, began higher mileage (for me)and noticed discomfort after runs. Thus decided pay 20 more than for karrimors and got myself a pair of addidas; no problems since despite even higher mileage, so comfortable
hope it helps
seb
colina - on 26 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:


ta seb probably do the same
IainRUK - on 26 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:
> (In reply to ianruk)
> [...]
> went to sports soccer jjb sports yesterday and actually bought a pair of karrimor shoes which in all honesty didn't feel too bad jogging yesterday ,however after reading up on karrimors trainers not sure whether I made the right purchase so am considering taking them back tonite.
>
> wondering if its worth spending the xtra money and get a good branded shoe
>
> do you mean there are purpose built shoes for neutral and pronate runners?

Generally yeah, you have a shoe for neutral runners.. pronators.. then also depending on foot strike.. I'm a forefoot runner so like some decent fore foot cushioning.. heal barely sees the ground so thats not an issue.
mrchewy - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to IainRUK: Interesting you've said you became more neutral - the same has happened to me, mostly down to landing on my forefoot these days. Which in turn has massively helped the knees.
Always used Asics 2000 series but have moved over to their 'normal' shoes but my last pair have no wear on the heel at all, so I'm on the hunt for something flatter on the heel myself.

Well done on selection too Iain - you must be proper chuffed.
Steff - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to mrchewy:

I have also "gone neutral" over the years. I think it's to do with running style. Once people speed up their cadence they land differently. I suppose foot strength also has something to do with it.
IainRUK - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to mrchewy: Thanks, amazingly being a GB runner has probably cost me my Welsh vest at the world long distance mountain running trophy.. as I didn't run a trial race.. yet others didn't.. honestly the lack of consistency of selectors is incredulous.. Yet GB wouldn't let you run a marathon so close to the worlds.. Good thinking by Wales to clash too events..

janiejonesworld - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to Ciro:
> (In reply to colina)
>
> It's been shown that the fancy "technology" in running shoes makes no difference to injury rates, so just go with whatever feels comfortable within your budget. Or go barefoot and spend the 50 on a new cam ;)

the science behind that is of roughly equal quality to that underpinning the "Oil Of Olay takes 20 years off you" ads. In reality the jury is still very much out.

If you're completely new to running you would be best going to a really good running shop staffed by fanatics and taking their advice. I don't know your area but the excellent Running Bear in Alderley Edge is not a million miles from Chester.

Bear in mind that Iain is an elite athlete and many people can't get away with the sort of minimalist shoes he's using. (Wow, congrats on selection Iain!)

Also, whilst running might seem a self-evidently normal human activity good running style/form is not necessarily so and is really important. Joining a club which welcomes and coaches beginners is worthwhile even if only for a few months. I know a couple of the lads from Tattenhall runners (near you) and they are a friendly bunch.

Good luck with it
Milesy - on 27 Jun 2013
I over pronate because my arches have collapsed. That ship has sailed already so I need some arch support. I just use my NHS orthotic insoles in a pair of neutral trainers though.
SteveRi - on 27 Jun 2013
If you're in Chester there's Up & Running. Running Bear great if you want an away day (first offroad shoes I ever bought I went there and did the Kinder Downfall route straight after - proper life changing day!). If you fancy a club Tattenhall mentioned are great, as are Delamare Spartans, and us of course (Helsby). If you're a bit more beginnery there's a new Run Chester group. Tried the Delamere parkrun?
spamo on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:

I would personally forget (to a degree) about the price tag. I wanted to start running when I was 18 to lose some weight so went to a proper running shop and purchased some 120 decent and supportive trainers. Luckily for me they were heavily discounted to about 80!

The point is I used them for a month and then gave up but every summer I come back from Uni I start using them again and have never had any problems. I am now 23 and running fairly regularly and they are still going. I very much doubt this would be the case if I had bought some cheaper ones. They either would have fallen apart or I would have got joint pains from incorrectly fitted running shoes and given up completely!

With running shoes always go for quality!
Milesy - on 27 Jun 2013
When I used to be fat and unfit I started running in a pair of Gazelles! Not a smart idea as I think that contributed to my feet and knee problems.
Ava Adore - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:

Don't take them back just because they're cheap and Karrimor. A serious runner I know buys cheap shoes because he does so much mileage he gets through them quickly. Cheap shoes seem to suit him though. Sadly, they don't me. I've tried every brand known to man and generally end up with expensive Asics as I like their cushioning.
Bob kate bob on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to Ava Adore: You have reminded me, I have 2 good pairs of running shoes that I have hardly worn. They just wern't wide enough for my excesivly wide feet. So I really should sell them on.
Ava Adore - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to Bob kate bob:

I too have wide feet. A lot of brands are just too darned narrow. Asics are always a great fit for me though.
JamButty - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to colina: I've found the "new" Karrimor cheap shoes seem to have exposed stitches in silly places, so they rub.
I'd support the views about checking your gait, as I think it contributed to my achilles problems a few years back, changed shoes and no problems - Ascic gels by the way which can be around 50, great shoes.
Bob kate bob on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to Ava Adore: I have a pair of these
http://www.runandbecome.com/Shop-Online/Womens-Running-Shoes/Road/Stability/New-Balance-W940-v2-%28D...

The lady in the shop said most people that think they have wide feet find them too wide. They were perfect for me :-)

I like that Run and Become have a section all about wide fitting running shoes http://run.runandbecome.com/running-product-reviews/shoes/best-wide-fitting-running-shoes/

Ava Adore - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to JamButty:

I recently bought a pair of Asics (can't remember model) which were 90 (reduced from 120). Expressing my horror at the price to the shop assistant, I asked whether they'd make me run faster. "Oh yes", she said with a smile, "I guarantee it".

The following week I got a 5K PB and a 6 mile non-race PB.

:-)
The New NickB - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to spamo:

I suspect your logic a bit, virtually all shoes from reputable brands are of similar quality, you tend to pay more for things like support, design, new technology, brand exclusivity etc.

To the OP, as others have said take advice from a decent shop, they can probably offer shoes at various price points and may be able to offer sale shoes. Get the ones that feel good on your feet.

Sweatshop do a 30 day no quibble return policy, they will also give you 10% discount if you register for parkrun (free, you don't even have to do it) and take along your barcode.
Glyno - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to colina:

I see from your profile you're in Chester.
I'd recommend the Asics shop at Cheshire Oaks for good advice and reductions on excellent shoes.
colina - on 27 Jun 2013
In reply to Glyno: bloody hell /too late just bought some from the running shop in bridge street chester about n hour ago ,look the business the make is "brooks" will probably stick with them now but will bare in mind Cheshire oaks for next time! thanks.

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