UKC

Climbs 520
Rocktype Volcanic tuff
Altitude 1362m a.s.l
Faces all

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Matt Goode, Happy Boulders © Alex Messenger

Crag features

The Happy Boulders is a 3/4 mile long shallow canyon that cuts into the southern end of the volcanic plateau north of Bishop. The rock is the volcanic Bishop tuff type typical of this area. 

The aptly named Happy Boulders is an extraordinarily rich bouldering area with over 500 problems all within about 10 mins of each other. Many of the problems here are world class and have great landings and open viewing areas. Regardless of the grade, the climbing tends to be physical and steep using good-sized holds.

The canyon is at about 1400m in altitude. The cliff-band forming the western rim of the canyon faces northeast and so gets plenty of shade during the day making it a great place for climbing on warmer days. The east rim, in contrast, faces southwest and is very sunny.

Approach notes

From Bishop, head north out of town and take Highway 6 for a mile or so to the second of two roads on the right (signed Five Bridges Road). Follow this to a crossroads just after a construction site and take the dirt road on the left (Chalk Bluff Road). Follow this for a couple of miles to a parking area with portaloo. A path leads from here up and into the heavenly boulders.

Plentiful rock with vicious sharp crimps and sloping pockets at all grades. Don't be stopped by the bouldering nearest the parking lot - keep going, it gets better!
Pythonist - 02/Dec/08
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Climbs at this crag

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Name Grade Stars Type Logs Partner Ascents
These climbs you have climbed clean.
These climbs you have climbed by seconding or top-roping.
These climbs you have Dogged.
These climbs you Did not Finish.
Climbs are waiting to be checked by a crag moderator, and may not be accurate. Climbs can't be verified by a crag moderator, and they need more information to confirm it. Climbs are no longer climbable.
Volunteer to moderate Happy Boulders
We rely on volunteers to moderate their local crags. You would check updates and approve climbs added to the database. It's a very easy job, and all you need is a guidebook and an hour or two each month. [ read more ]
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