UKC

/ Teenage boy and Slopers / Mantles

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L PhilTimpotts on 15 Apr 2018

Looking for a bit of help. 

I haven't been bouldering outside that much but the issue that has crept up every time is my son's wrist pain when topping out or any sort of sloper move. He's 15. He climbs inside a couple of times a week. We've been to Burbage south and Cratcliffe a couple of times, he's had wrist pain quite early on in the session.

Is there any simple exercise he could do at home to alleviate the pain or help strengthen his wrists for that kind of pressure? 

He's not really getting on the slopers at the wall yet, spends most of his time working slabs. If he does get near one, wrist pain...

 

 

MFB - on 15 Apr 2018
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

I think he should stop before it hurts, gentle progression, it's only climbing

 

L PhilTimpotts on 15 Apr 2018
In reply to MFB:

Thanks for your reply, it's a good point. This is all about enabling him to climb a little longer and continue to enjoy it without getting the pain.

I just wondered if there's anything he can do to strengthen his wrists (if that's what needs strengthening?) I just wondered if anyone had come across this issue with kids before and if there was a solution?

 

MFB - on 15 Apr 2018
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

I quite like laps on easy routes autobelayer but it's dull

L Presley Whippet on 15 Apr 2018
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

Teenage boy with wrist problems, check his browsing history then buy some boxing gloves. 

Greasy Prusiks on 15 Apr 2018
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

I've no idea if this is good advice but I occasionally get wrist pain and find a loop of tape around the wrist (quite tight, about an inch or two below the joint) stops it hurting. I'd get some proper advice before applying that (or anything else) to your son though as his bones and tendons are still developing. Good luck. 

Post edited at 21:13
marsbar - on 15 Apr 2018
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

I think he needs to stop doing what is causing pain and rest it.  He is still growing and you don't want to cause long term damage at his age.  See a GP if it persists after a few weeks rest.

alx on 15 Apr 2018
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

Rest until the pain stops. I would check for range of motion issues on the wrist, really tight forearm muscles could be limiting the joint. Stretching and strengthening both forearm extensor and wrists would help.

iccle_bully - on 07:29 Mon
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

I would recommend getting him checked out, there may well be some very simple exercises or stretches that can be done however you need an expert to tell you what those are, especially on bones/tissue/tendons which are still developing. 

A decent physio with an understanding of climbing would be good, not sure where you're based but Harris and Ross in Manchester have an excellent reputation.

Mark Kemball - on 11:48 Mon
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

Be VERY careful, get advice from a good climbing coach and / or physio. He is probably going through a growth spurt at the moment. While this is happening it is possible to do permanent damage to growth plates etc. this can have a long term / permanent effect. Durring growth spurts be very careful about training etc. You should be looking at antagonistic execises stretching etc. A good coach will advise on this.

Please note, I'm not an expert, but my son (now 17) was a member of the GB development squad last year and I'm trying to re-hash some of the advice we were given by the coaches. 

I cannot over emphasise the importance of this, I do personally know of at least 2 young climbers who have long term problems because of unsuitable training.

SuperLee1985 - on 14:21 Mon
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

I'm not a teenage boy, but I will get wrist pain if I try a particularly  slopery problem (either indoors or outdoors) before I've warmed up properly. Make sure he takes the time to warm up properly on easy routes before jumping on the hard stuff.

Not warming up is an easy way to pick up all kinds of injuries (from experience).

Rigid Raider - on 14:54 Mon
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

Anybody who practices a strenuous sport should know that as muscle power develops, the supporting structures of the joints need time to catch up. If you don't rest and allow the process, which takes years rather than weeks or months, you will cause damage. Children over-practising on musical instruments and suffering tendon pain are a similar example and I have suffered periods of knee tenderness as I have pushed myself road cycling and developed bigger, stronger quads. 

Gentle massage with an ibuprofen gel helps in the short term.

Post edited at 14:55
L PhilTimpotts on 21:33 Wed
In reply to PhilTimpotts:

Thank you everyone for your responses.


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