/ Looking for Tent Recommendations

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BFG 12:56 Thu

Right, so I've been 'inspired' by another week of lovely British weather to expand my tent selection.

I'm after something that can function as a 'base' for weeks away in UK / Europe. Ideal features are:

- I can stand up in the middle compartment

- Can cook inside it on a table (so needs room / ventilation)

- Can stand up to British weather / will last

- Has a couple of sleeping compartments

- Is dog proof

Most of the 'family' tents you see on the market don't look that well made or like they'd stand up to much, so I'm really interested to hear from anyone who's got any recommendations on tents that will last 

Many thanks for whatever help you can offer

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cb294 13:18 Thu
In reply to BFG:

My standard reply is Eureka technical cotton tunnel tents. Ours is twentyish years old, survived a night with 140km/h gales that flattened the Hilleberg pitched next to it with minor damage (one guy line loop torn off), is great both in the North and in the heat in Corsica (MUCH better than fully synthetic tents), is big enough for me to stand in and to put a table with five camp seats in the porch. 

We have only one sleeping compartment, but you could always get the bigger version.

CB

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toad 13:40 Thu
In reply to BFG:

Its a bit niche and VERY expensive but my tentipi has changed my whole outlook on camping. Much more enjoable than aeven a big hooped family nylon tent

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In reply to toad:

Me and the family enjoyed spending a week in a Tentipi, which I reviewed once. It's amazingly well made, and quite fun, but I thought there are quite a few drawbacks versus a more conventional tent: 

  • Sloping walls in every direction mean headroom is surprisingly limited unless you're right in the middle.
  • There's a ruddy great pole in the middle.
  • Despite the clever raising hat arrangement I don't think through-ventilation is as effective as a tent with two big side doors.
  • If you've not paid extra for the porch/awning thing then you've got a door on a slope, and since it has no cowl of any sort then when it's pouring with rain you end up getting a lot of water inside the tent every time you use the door.
  • And one you touched on, the price. That instantly ruled it out for us as a keeper.
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Durbs 14:32 Thu
In reply to BFG:

Assuming you're essentially car camping, I still recommend Decathlons's Quechua Family XL 6.3 (or similar).

Tested in wind-tunnels, good ventilation when hot, good waterproofing when wet. Huge amounts of space, some nice extra features and very quick to put up.

Downside is it's very big when packed down (plus a pump) and the main large door doesn't open up, it opens in and right... so you can't stick a couple of poles in it to form an awning..

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toad 15:43 Thu
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:

Its much more comfy in properly bad weather- its very solid and you dont get the noise of nylon flapping. Much lighter and stronger than a bell tent. Ive been in storms and in the morning its just been us and the little mountain tents left

Plus the woodburner makes it a much less humid proposition in downpours

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In reply to toad:

True, they're very solid and non-flappy!

A woodburner sounds like doing it properly, in a Ray Mearsy sort of way. But I've often wondered about C0 danger. Is this a thing, or are they definitely safe?? 

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toad 18:19 Thu
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:

Supposedly very safe. I do use a co alarm but its never gone off. If you look for it theres a facebook usergroup woth lots of discussion

But after a properly cold wet day, iagine all yoir gear bone dry by bed time

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In reply to toad:

That does sound good!

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