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REVIEW: SALEWA Alpine Hemp Climbing Collection

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 UKC Gear 23 Nov 2021

Though it comes at a premium price, the quality of this climbing-oriented clothing range speaks for itself, says Rob Greenwood, while the use of more environmentally friendly fibres is also a major selling point. 

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In reply to UKC Gear:

How much more environmentally friendly are these fabrics really though:

"The main body features 53% 205 g/sqm ripstop hemp, 44% polyester and 3% elastane"

There is a reduction in the volume of plastic used but the fabric still couldn't be composted and would produced plastic fibres in washing. It says it is PFC free but that should apply to most man made fibres. Is it any better than 100% polyester?

In reply to DubyaJamesDubya:

> How much more environmentally friendly are these fabrics really though:

> "The main body features 53% 205 g/sqm ripstop hemp, 44% polyester and 3% elastane"

> There is a reduction in the volume of plastic used but the fabric still couldn't be composted and would produced plastic fibres in washing. It says it is PFC free but that should apply to most man made fibres. Is it any better than 100% polyester?

That is the million dollar question I suppose (and not one that's easy to answer).

My take on it is that yes, it is better, but by how much - it's hard to quantify. Maybe there's an article to be written on this sometime, although it'll not be by me, as it'd require an expert to do it (and the many, many variables involved) justice.

In reply to Rob Greenwood - UKClimbing:

I guess my concern was that the environmental worth of the product seemed to be put forward as a major selling point when it is probably marginal at best. The hemp/polyester blend may well make a really great fabric to wear but overselling the environmental worth is not desirable.

Post edited at 11:12
In reply to DubyaJamesDubya:

What we need is proper carbon footprint information. I guess as long as carbon remains in the ground from not using plastic that's a good thing, but if hemp production requires getting more carbon out of the ground than using plastic it's a bad thing.

In reply to Toerag:

> What we need is proper carbon footprint information. I guess as long as carbon remains in the ground from not using plastic that's a good thing, but if hemp production requires getting more carbon out of the ground than using plastic it's a bad thing.

Not quite the same, but we're in the process of buying a new dishwasher, and within that particular sphere it's easy to get info on how energy efficient that product is, as each is provided with a rating. Wouldn't it make life more simple if there was something similar, but for what we're describing here. 

In reply to Toerag:

> What we need is proper carbon footprint information. I guess as long as carbon remains in the ground from not using plastic that's a good thing, but if hemp production requires getting more carbon out of the ground than using plastic it's a bad thing.

I could be wrong but I gather the carbon footprint of the plastic is one of the less important factors.

In reply to DubyaJamesDubya:

> I could be wrong but I gather the carbon footprint of the plastic is one of the less important factors.

Well are you wrong or not? If you are going to call people out for potential ambiguity over their green credentials it’s probably best not to use ambiguous arguments to support your case. If it is “one of the less important factors” how much less?

Assuming you are correct one of the benefits, IMO, of buying products that at least attempt be more carbon juteras is proving to manufactures that there is a demand for it. I could be wrong but I think manufactures in the US are producing more efficient domestic appliances because Californians (the richest market) were demanding them, not because of govt mandate. It obviously needs both but if consumers demand carbon neutral products, manufactures will produce them making it easier for gives to introduce legislation to force the rest.

In reply to UKC Gear:

Why have this review if when I searched, the Pants don't appear to even be available in the UK ?
Or is there some information on where they can be sourced

In reply to DubyaJamesDubya:

Mixed fibres also make post-use recycling more difficult.

Leviticus is also down on mixed fibre garments...

 OrangeBob 22:22 Sat
In reply to UKC Gear:

If the hemp fibre is processed mechanically it can be an eco fabric. It's greener than cotton as it requires fewer inputs to grow it.

If it's chemically processed hemp viscose it isn't.


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