/ When to upgrade shoes.

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Shaunhaynes99 25 Aug 2019

  I brought a cheap paid of  simond climbing shoes to see if, I like  and I'm in love  with it with. The shoes are about 4 months old now and  are a little saggy around my toes . The heel and the rubber seem fine though 

What people advise on looking at  upgrading to  more intermediate  shoe? Or if it not broken dont fix it, I'd rather  spend a bit of time  in making sure I have the right sure then rush out i. A couple  of months and buy the wrong one.  will be used mainly for  bouldering indoors  with w a little bit of tr or leading,  I know overall shoes wont make climb  load of grades higher. 

Jackspratt 25 Aug 2019
In reply to Shaunhaynes99:

Not an expert but I'd upgrade immediately if the toes are even a bit loose, fit is everything. Even in a cheaper beginner shoe. You'd be surprised how much it helps when your shoe doesn't roll around your foot. You will likely find your technique will improve as a result.

1
Gendo 25 Aug 2019
In reply to Shaunhaynes99:

I had the £39 Simond shoes as well, they are actually pretty decent, I'd suggest replacing them over upgrading unless you're looking for specific features.

Beginner shoes from other brands are almost double the price and more aggressive ones come at a steeper cost both money wise and comfort.  

tjdodd 25 Aug 2019
In reply to Shaunhaynes99:

I replace mine when they are falling apart.  Most shoes will soften over time (were yours saggy when you first bought them or have they just softened over time?).  By climbing in softer shoes you will develop your technique and learn to be precise with foot work.  However, if they are poorly fitting then it might be worth looking for something better fitting - different shoes will suit different shaped feet so worth experimenting until you get what is best for you.

At your stage I would not get anything too aggressive when you do get a new pair.  Focus on shoes that are comfortable.  It will be far more enjoyable and I think you will climb and progress better if you are comfortable and enjoying it.  Some of the best climbers at my local walls do not use aggressive shoes.

baron 25 Aug 2019
In reply to Shaunhaynes99:

Socks.

Woolly, thick and red, as worn by Ron Fawcett.

Shaunhaynes99 26 Aug 2019
In reply to Shaunhaynes99:

No they were fairly tighter to start with but have. Now softened up, the rubber is still very good.  It's just the outside of the toe section has loosened up a bit, they are  very comfy in fact I dont think I take them off when I go bouldering. 

I have  still step on to  small features. Like 1cm lips and they hold well. Plus I love the fact they are bright blue. 

Maybe I short order a another pair but in a slightly  smaller size. So I  keep the shoe I'm happy with a loke but just  is just a little bit tighter. Without spending 80 pound plus. 

Post edited at 07:02
In reply to tjdodd:

> I replace mine when they are falling apart.  Most shoes will soften over time (were yours saggy when you first bought them or have they just softened over time?).  By climbing in softer shoes you will develop your technique and learn to be precise with foot work.

I've often seen that stated.... personally I am not convinced (shading towards thinking it's potentially detrimental rubbish). When I started climbing, a climbing shop sold me a pair of bulbous rubber clogs, marketed as suitable for beginers.  It was a complete revelation when I purchased a pair of more precise shoes.  Previously, I had been unable to use marginal footholds, so necessarily ignored them, it was only when I got decent shoes that my footwork started to develop.  My view is that bad shoes can give too little feedback to learn efficiently. 

If I was the OP, I would go to a shop, preferably one at a climbing wall, and try on a few pairs.  If any seem to offer a significant improvement in precision and "feel", then upgrade.   It might be the more expensive option, but think about the cost amortised across, say, a 6 month lifespan; what would you pay to be a better climber and improve faster for 6 months?  That said, if "upgrades" do not seem appreciably better than your current shoes, then save your money - perhaps your feet are just suited to Simmonds.

Post edited at 08:01
Fishmate 26 Aug 2019
In reply to thebigfriendlymoose:

> I've often seen that stated.... personally I am not convinced (shading towards thinking it's potentially detrimental rubbish).

I'd definitely second that. Climbing is primarily a movement based activity and if you can't stand on credit card edges with confidence, for example, or create sufficient downforce or tension then you can't move your body efficiently and balance suffers as a result.

Buy what feels right but don't buy sloppy slippers. Undoing bad practice and the reduced confidence that gives you can be a tougher task than learning correctly.

jkarran 27 Aug 2019
In reply to Shaunhaynes99:

Replace or repair them when they're worn out, shoes are expensive and they wear fast, especially when you're starting out (who am I kidding, I always dragged my left toes wrecking that shoe).

There's really no harm in a comfortable fit, even a slightly loose fit unless and until it is causing you specific problems standing on particular holds or with fatigue. Even then a technique change will usually get you past a specific problem and it's worth learning, you'll need it again in fancier stickier shoes, just on poorer holds.

jk


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