/ Expedition Cloudburst or Alpkit Gourdon?

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ballsac - on 17 May 2017
Simple as it sounds really - I'm looking for a lightweight daysack that I can use on multi-day backpacking trips.

It needs to be waterproof/resistant for weather and river crossings, and it needs to be durable, and it needs to be both lightweight and pack down small so I can stick in/on my backpacking rucksack.

The Gourdon and the Cloudburst are now of similar price so I may as well just go on quality/features.

Views/opinions/experiences?

Cheers.
HeMa on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

I have or have had both...

Gourdon is heavier and more robust.

Cloudburst is really thin, more akin to the thin parachute fabric, and it didn't take me long to rip it whilst climbing. Have yet to do that with Gourdon.

Cloudburst packs a lot smaller (due to the thin fabric).
Dr.S at work - on 17 May 2017
In reply to HeMa:

I think that is bang on - in addition if you are talking about the 20l Gourdon, then the mesh pockets are a handy addition when compared to the cloudburst.
Guy Hurst - on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

I reckon the Cloudburst is more useful for side trips when backpacking, simply because it's so light and packs down so small. It's durable enough, providing you don't drag it over rocks.
Fiona Reid - on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

I'll throw another option into the mix. The Simond Cliff 20 available from Decathlon for £12.99.

It's not fully waterproof so might not be what you want. However it packs down small and based on my experience is a lot more durable than the Cloudburst. I've not tried the Gourdon so can't comment.

CharlieMack - on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

Plus one for Gourdon. I've had the 20 for a few years now. Not showing any signs of giving up. Used from doing national three peaks where it was still comfortable at the end, to bouldering trips where it gets properly battered to just around town.
Definitely one of my best bits of kit, and I'm a proper gear geek.
ballsac - on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

cheers folks - i think the cloudburst is out so its down the the decathlon/Simond offering and the Alpkit. i'll go over to decathlon and have a feel and make the decision then - the Alpkit is probably more practical, but the decathlon thing looks, like, waaaaaaaay quewel...

grateful.



TobyA on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

The cliffs aren't in UK Decathlons it seems. Very easy to order one in though. Much lighter than a Gordon but not waterproof and not as tough. My Gordon must be 10 years old and still waterproof.
HeMa on 17 May 2017
In reply to TobyA:

> Much lighter than a Gordon ...

Actually the Cliff is rather heavy (long sidezip) for such a product. If my feeble memory servers me correctly, the REI Flash somehing (18-20 liters) is a lot lighter using comparable fabrics to the Cliff.
ballsac - on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

Gourdon it is then!

The steel coloured one I think...
TobyA on 17 May 2017
In reply to HeMa:

> If my feeble memory servers me correctly, the REI Flash somehing (18-20 liters) is a lot lighter using comparable fabrics to the Cliff.

I've got a Flash too https://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=168429 , it might be lighter but if it is, not by much. I've toted a full trad rack up Buchaille Etive Mor in the Cliff and it was surprising OK. The Flash I would scrunch up and carry up in a bigger pack.
sheelba - on 17 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

I shredded the Gordon but to be fair that was bushwacking through the jungle. Sounds like you've ruled out the cloudburst, and I may be too late, but I have it now and it is far lighter and more packable than the gourdon. For what you want it for I reckon it's a far better choice. I'm not sure why you would need something particularly durable for backpacking daywalks.
angry pirate - on 18 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

Another vote for a Gourdon. My 20 is a lot of years old now and has been hammered. I've melted two holes in mine wearing it down a slide backwards (don't ask) though it also wore the nalgene inside so no complaints there!
I have the 20 with the side pockets which lead to lots of stitching and taping on the inside. After a few years of overstuffing changes of clothes and climbing kit in I did manage to rip the taping off the pocket seams.
If I ever replace mine, I'll probably go for the 25 as the lack of side pockets wouldn't bother me and the design is more robust (I have mates with Gourdon 25s and they have worn better than mine for that exact reason)

ballsac - on 23 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

If anyone is interested I had a trip to Decathlon in Coventry - they have the Cliff climbing sac.

It certainly looks tasty, but the back wasn't 'backpacky' anf supportive enough for what I wanted, so it's the Alpkit Gourdon for me...
L izzznet on 24 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

Possibly too late but the old (lighter) Blue Ice Dragonfly 18L are still around - that plus a dry bag liner would be lighter (400g vs 470g) and I'd guess tougher (packs tiny).
olliehales - on 25 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

I have the gourdon 20l with the side pockets for water bottles & its ace, however for multi day hiking trips I find it a tad small with my 250g summer weight down bag inside plus other items.

For my recent camino de santiago hiking trip, I used a OMM classic 32 which was brilliant - much more durable than it looks and much more comfortable than the gourdon. Also the large mesh pocket is ideal for stowing wet clothes to allow them to dry.

gourdon has the advantage of being half the price however. As others have mentioned, the decathlon bags also look great for the £££ and I saw a large number of people using these on the camino.
Dave B on 25 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

Are any of them any good as a tow float for swimming that doubles as a backpack?
Mal Grey - on 25 May 2017
In reply to Dave B:

I have a Gourdon, and its great, but I wouldn't trust it to be 100% waterproof used for long periods that way. Then again, I wouldn't trust any of my (many) drybags, I'd probably use a lighter liner drybag inside the Gourdon or other more durable bag.
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Only a hill - on 25 May 2017
In reply to ballsac:

I'm late to this thread too, but I'm a huge fan of the Alpkit Gourdon. I've had two so far since 2006, and both have lasted for roughly five years of heavy daily use (I'm about to pull the trigger on a third). I think durability is quite acceptable – with lighter use most people would probably get a decade out of a Gourdon.

The value can't be beaten really. I think I paid about £25 for my first one. They're still under £40. I plan to keep using these rucksacks for as long as Alpkit keep making them.

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