/ Taking friends climbing with their kids

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
bpmclimb on 09 Jun 2017
I'm an experienced SPA instructor, but don't run my own company, having always freelanced for other companies (and been covered by their insurance). I'd like to take a couple of close friends climbing, and get their kids (3 in total, the youngest is 5) top roping - probably at a Dartmoor crag. The possibility of extending the group to include a cousin's family has been mentioned. Would you:

Go for it but make it clear that it's a casual "as friends" arrangement?
Do it through a company I know and offer to be (unpaid) staff for the day?
Don't touch it with a bargepole?

timjones - on 09 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb:

> I'm an experienced SPA instructor, but don't run my own company, having always freelanced for other companies (and been covered by their insurance). I'd like to take a couple of close friends climbing, and get their kids (3 in total, the youngest is 5) top roping - probably at a Dartmoor crag. The possibility of extending the group to include a cousin's family has been mentioned. Would you:Go for it but make it clear that it's a casual "as friends" arrangement?Do it through a company I know and offer to be (unpaid) staff for the day?Don't touch it with a bargepole?

Do it as a friends arrangement.

Everyone should have friends and treat them as such.
wbo - on 09 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb: the first. It's nice to have friends

bpmclimb on 12 Jun 2017
In reply:

I'm surprised - I thought I'd get a fair few posts warning about duty of care, lack of insurance, etc.
Alex Riley on 12 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb:

If you are an spa these issues should have been covered fairly comprehensively on the course.

You do have a duty of care, but if, like you say are an experienced spa then I would hope you would understand the risks associated of working in that context.

The parents being there negates any licencing issues. Insurance is up to you, I wouldn't bother, but I understand the risks and the responsibilities.
Timmd on 12 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb:

What the others have said, if you know your SPA you'll know how to be safe, just tell your friends how they need to be safe with their children.
Timmd on 12 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb:

A responsible friend is a good friend to have.
ads.ukclimbing.com
The Ivanator - on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb:

I've taken friends kids toproping before, as long as the parents are good with it and you take every reasonable precaution (I know you would), then I would absolutely do this on a friends basis.
Three Cliffs area on Gower is another good option destination wise, when I took Noah last summer he got a lot from it at just 4 years old.
bpmclimb on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to Alex Riley:

> If you are an spa these issues should have been covered fairly comprehensively on the course.

Well, yes - but perhaps not completely - there are grey areas. And my assessment was a long time ago - one tries to stay current, but things do change.

> You do have a duty of care, but if, like you say are an experienced spa then I would hope you would understand the risks associated of working in that context.

"Like I say" I am indeed an experienced instructor, confident about running such a session, and understand the risks involved, so your hopes are well-founded! My post was about the issues surrounding possible litigation following an accident. It's bound to cross one's mind, especially in view of the fact that this particular group looks set to expand to include my friends cousin (from the USA) and her family - I don't know them personally at all.

> The parents being there negates any licencing issues. Insurance is up to you, I wouldn't bother, but I understand the risks and the responsibilities.

Thanks for the info.
Toerag - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb:

The problem is that even though you're not taking money or in 'loco parentis', you could still be sued by someone or their insurance company for damages caused by negligence I guess?
whenry on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to bpmclimb:

Presumably you're a member of the BMC? In that case, surely you are covered (even as an instructor) in the event of an accident by the standard BMC members' combined cover, as you aren't being paid.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.