/ Shin Splints Advice needed

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Jamesrlee - on 18 Jun 2017
hi,
I have just started running, and I have noticed pain starting in my shins, from my understanding this is shin splints.
I am young but have been out of proper fitness for a couple off years, the run I have done the last two times is about 5.1km half road and half stones on the beach. I usually have my shoes tight but have read that this isn't always the best idea.

I was wandering if any off you have some advice for me, am I running to far for a newbe? or is the type off ground effecting me? or is it because I am just new and my muscles are week?

Thanks
Yanis Nayu - on 18 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

Build up more slowly than you have. It takes time for your structural fitness to match your metabolic fitness (that's what I find anyway). I was plagued with shin splits when I did athletics and dearly wish I'd followed this advice.

I would imagine the stony beach running isn't helping much either.
wobble - on 18 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:
Worth a read....https://runnersconnect.net/the-ultimate-guide-to-shin-splints-for-runners/
As Yanis says, if prone to this type of injury you need to take it easy and slowly build up.
SouthernSteve on 18 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

I would recommend seeing someone who can assess your running gait. Landing with your leg beyond your body and other faults are causes of this problem, so increasing your cadence for instance is recommended. However it is a minefield to advise without understanding the consequences of change and that's where a physio or sport's coach can really help. In addition to the RunnersConnect link the following is fairly comprehensive. I would drop the beach part of your run at the moment.

http://www.kinetic-revolution.com/what-causes-shin-splints-in-runners/

Hope that helps. Steve
Clint86 - on 18 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

Rest up for a bit. Start back slowly.
yorkshireman - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to Yanis Nayu:

> Build up more slowly than you have. It takes time for your structural fitness to match your metabolic fitness (that's what I find anyway). I was plagued with shin splits when I did athletics and dearly wish I'd followed this advice.

I'd say the above is the best advice.

Getting 'fit' isn't too hard. Your CV system can make fairly rapid changes but the biomechanical elements of your body take longer to adapt, with the result that you feel like you can go faster/longer but the body starts to fall apart.

Try and run consistently - 4 short runs a week is better than two long runs.

Best of luck and have fun.
Deleted bagger - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to Clint86:

> Rest up for a bit. Start back slowly.

And get new shoes!
Jesus - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

I suffered from shin splints, and in my case it was caused by the trainers I was using. I went to a proper running shop, where somebody checked how my feet struck the ground. They were then able to advise on which type of shoe I needed. This solved the issue for me. (Before doing this I would go to a shop such as JJB and pick trainers I liked the look of).
Clint86 - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to Deleted bagger:

Yes, thats a good idea, although when you are young, its amazing what you can get away with if you build up slowly.
Y Gribin - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:
I had the same when I started running. Here's what I did:

- build up more slowly, as advised already
- wear compression socks (in my case I liked wearing them after a run rather than during)
- make as much of your running off road as possible. This was the best tip I had - it allows you to strengthen up on a better surface so you'll be stronger when you get back on the road
- wear Hokas. This is a personal preference but it helped me!

Good luck
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Diddy - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

Injuries need to be accurately diagnosed before treatment. A visit to sports therapist would be good. Lots of good advice on YouTube.
Wait till you can walk and do relevant stretches pain free. Walking the route pain free will help positivity. Then I would alternate walking and slow jogging sections for several weeks i.e build up to a full run.
Forget the beach it affects your gait and will overuse your shin muscles.
handofgod on 26 Jun 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

How do you tie your laces?
Have you tired the parallel lacing technique. I did and it massively improved my shin splints and overall lower leg problems.
Heres a video on how to:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BsViAtj7-o

Roobag - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

I found glucosamine and condroitine (or whatever it's called) supplements good.
jethro kiernan - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

I had bad shin splints when I started, it may help if you exercise the smaller antagonistic muscles around the shin, slow heel dips off a step going as low as you feel comfortable and slowly raising the foot until its level and repeat, with me it was all the soft tissue muscles etc around the shin that caused the pain, not as it almost felt like at my shin bone crumbling under the pressure of running.
And as other have said get of the road onto a trail
Pedro50 on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to handofgod:

> How do you tie your laces?

> Have you tired the parallel lacing technique. I did and it massively improved my shin splints and overall lower leg problems.

> Heres a video on how to:


Fabulous assortment of lacing videos. I am converted to the lock lace method for my fell shoes. Thanks!
grice_philip - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee:

I had problems with shin splints for a couple of years, aggravated somewhat by flat feet. Insoles and compression socks helped a bit but it was heel strike that seemed to be causing me ongoing problems. I changed my running technique to something called pose running. There are plenty of YouTube videos on it. Essentially you run on the balls/flat of your feet so you calf muscle acts as a shock absorber. I've had no problems since changing technique.
wbo - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamesrlee: well you've certainly got a mixture of advice there. Do you stretch your calves, and preferably also hamstringen after running?
what shoes do you have? If you feel the sole inside can you feel big holes and dents ( kaput midsole).
Laces should keep your shoes on but mine certainly aren't tight.

(And Hoka's dont work for me - too soft. Very individual, but glad i tried)


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