/ Moels Hebog & Siabod

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BnB - on 16 Sep 2017

My wife and I had a couple of days in N Wales last week to clear our heads after a festival. Not surprisingly we weren't thinking about epic adventures and so settled on these two modest objectives.

What a lovely couple of mountains they are, with beautiful and fascinating approaches, stunning views and a taste of scrambling on each. Highly recommended. All the more so for their lack of pedestrian traffic.
Post edited at 14:24
pec on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

> What a lovely couple of mountains they are, with beautiful and fascinating approaches, stunning views and a taste of scrambling on each. Highly recommended. All the more so for their lack of pedestrian traffic. >

The honeypot effect in Snowdonia is remarkable and much more pronounced than in the Lakes. As soon as you get away from Snowdon, the Glyers and the Carnedds (well actually just the bits nearest to Ogwen cottage really) you hardly see anyone (and the parking is usually free as well ).

veteye on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

It's even better in snow.

In reply to Pec:-
Actually Moel Siabod is a fairly common hill for people in my club to climb, as it is fairly accessible and less long to go up and down if you are wanting to get away early on a Sunday or last day of a holiday.
pec on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to veteye:

Yes, Moel Siabod is probably the busiest peak outside the honeypots because it's so close to them I suppos, but its still not that busy considering how accessible it is.
Once you get into the Arans, the Arenigs and the Moelwyns (apart from Moel Siabod perhaps) and other such places, there's a 50/50 chance you won't see anybody else, even on a weekend.
John Stainforth - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to pec:

Moel Siabod, though eclipsed by its neighbors, has the special North Wales atmosphere and light. It is almost weirdly atmospheric.
SenzuBean - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

There are plenty of nice hills to find. I recommend hewitt bagging as a good way to find them
Check out the Rhinogydd
BnB - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:
> There are plenty of nice hills to find. I recommend hewitt bagging as a good way to find them

> Check out the Rhinogydd

I've climbed a good number of them over the years. Betws is theoretically only two hours from my home in Yorkshire, but the need to circumnavigate Manchester en route puts it nearer three, while Ambleside is reliably less than two hours and consequently more readily day-trippable.
Post edited at 07:43
BnB - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to John Stainforth:

> Moel Siabod, though eclipsed by its neighbors, has the special North Wales atmosphere and light. It is almost weirdly atmospheric.

Very true. On Siabod, I must have remarked more than once how reminiscent the light was of Skye.
keith-ratcliffe on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to veteye:
The Daear Ddu route (SE ridge) is a nice scramble.
llechwedd on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

Lovely to see a post where they're not described as Rhinogs.

'Carnedds'

ffs.
jess13 - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to llechwedd:

> Lovely to see a post where they're not described as Rhinogs.

> 'Carnedds'

> ffs.

Ah the Gaelic Language police - perhaps they could direct their derision at the idiots that put the Roman alphabet on to their language. If the job had been done correctly in the first place we wouldn't have all the mispronunciations and misunderstandings.
MG - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to llechwedd:

It's English for whatever the unpronounceable Welsh is. Do you think of Rome or Roma?
Nath93 - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

I remember going to a training course at Plas y Brenin maybe 7 years ago now, before I even knew how to tie a figure 8 properly or had learned any real hill craft. Went for a beautiful evening wander up Moel Siabod, picking an interesting line up the spur that faces Capel Curig and scrambled along the ridge to the summit and then back down the regular path.

I remember well that I had no sense of direction of which way was what or what I was looking at because I had only ever known directions around my local hills. I also remember having the whole hill to myself around about 6pm, I tried to get my course mates to join but they seemed too tired for it.

Came on a fair bit since then..
Mike Peacock on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

> There are plenty of nice hills to find. I recommend hewitt bagging as a good way to find them

Seconded. I finished my Welsh Hewitts last year and some of the highlights have been hills I never would have visited otherwise: Moel Penamnen (and its namesake cwm), Ddualt and Foel Goch in the Arenig hills all spring to mind.

Tyler - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

Thirty years after deciding I'd quite like to walk up it (for the name as much as anything) we walked up Pen Llythryg y Wrach a couple of weeks ago, I think this must have the best views of any hill in North Wales, you can see all of the Welsh 3000s (I think) as well as the Lake District etc. Easyish walk up and generally ok parking.
ben b - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to Tyler:

Also, the name I believe means the Hill of The Slippery Witch. Got to give that a try! Great wee hill and interesting irrigation leat below it. Worth exploring across to Crafnant from there - you won't meet a soul.

b
Lion Bakes on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

I can fully recommend walking up some of the popular peaks before or after sunrise. Magical time to be on the hills. Even early evening many popular hills are empty.
baron - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

Both Siabod and Hebog aren't walks they're flogs.
Hours to get to the top and then what?
Back down again because they aren't joined to anything else.
All made worse by being able to see the pub tantalisingly out of reach.
As for other peoples suggestions, Rhinogs, Arrans, Pen Lythrig Y Wrach, etc - wastelands, cold, wet, god forsaken wastelands.
Don't encourage anybody to visit these places, go to Mount Snowdon instead !
Wainers44 - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

Hebog is a wonderful if rather brutal climb. We walked it from Nant Gwynant going over Yr Aran first. Fair to say that was quite a long day and the pint in the Prince Llewelyn felt well earned!
DancingOnRock - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

I've had a look at that 3 times while out solo but have never been confident enough to get past about 2/3 of the way up the scramble. It seems to push me towards the right and into the area above the lake.

Just had a look at YouTube for some guidance but it doesn't seem to be a particularly obvious line.
Mike Peacock on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to DancingOnRock:

Daear Ddu? I've always thought it a very obvious line. Harder (and more exposed) to the right, generally easier to the left. To the top it degenerates more into bouldery walking/clambering.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/31983899@N03/5864617744
Gordon Stainforth - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to Mike Peacock:

That's a lovely picture of it. I've done it several times, because it's such an obvious, attractive route.
Mike Peacock on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

It's a great photo, agreed (one of Nick Livesey's). Daear Ddu itself is perhaps even more enjoyable when under a good covering of snow.
DancingOnRock - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to Mike Peacock:

Yes. It looks really obvious from low down. Maybe I just need to grow a pair and get on with it.
Rigid Raider - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to BnB:

Siabod was the very first mountain I climbed at the age of about seven.

In the 70s I spent a lot of time as a student in Snowdonia and this summer I went for a ride around the valleys on my bike and was absolutely astounded at the numbers of cars parked on both sides of the road for hundreds of yards each side of the road junction at the PyG. The Park authority seems to have given up on discouraging verge parkers and has widened the verges and placed hard surfaces there to allow drivers to get their cars off the road. What must Crib Goch be like nowadays on a summer weekend?
mysterion on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to DancingOnRock:
Right is where you should go from the start, about 2/3 of the way up is the best bit, onto ledges contouring around the tops of gullies looking down into the cwm
Post edited at 11:29
DancingOnRock - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to mysterion:

> Right is where you should go from the start, about 2/3 of the way up is the best bit, onto ledges contouring around the tops of gullies looking down into the cwm

I think that's as far as I got the last time. Followed a small path that just opened up into nothingness with a huge drop down into the cwm.

By then it was approaching dark. I'd run a marathon the week before and my legs were complaining so I retreated.

carlbullock - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to DancingOnRock: It's quite refreshing to see someone with common sense! I know of and have seen people not listening to their bodies or taking in the obvious risks only to pay for it later. The hills will always be there again for another day.
DancingOnRock - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to carlbullock:
Thanks. The guidebook said grade 1 scramble and keep slightly to the left of the ridge. It also said the scrambling was all easily escapable. Once I was on the ridge I found it difficult to tell whereabouts I was and whenever I skirted left I just ended up contouring or dropping down.

You're also right on the left hand edge of the 1:25000 map from memory so was worried about escaping too far to the left and getting stuck somewhere in the dark.

I think next time I'll go up early in the day with some sandwiches and just potter up and down exploring.
Post edited at 18:59
richprideaux - on 19 Sep 2017
In reply to DancingOnRock:

I know of a few who have found themselves drifting off to the left on the ridge. The difference between the harder and easy lines on the ridge is only metres at times, so you virtually need to handrail the cwm edge on the right anyway.

Not the best place to camp though: https://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=295500
carlbullock - on 20 Sep 2017
In reply to richprideaux: :-D that pic made me chuckle, it looks proper misserable. Still better than the office though.
richprideaux - on 20 Sep 2017
In reply to carlbullock:

Due to a weird quirk of the topography it was actually the least windy bit. It was also to get images for a review of the tent and too many folk accuse you of not trying things properly...

Not many winks of sleep were had that night

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