/ Loss of motivation after injury

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Cbee20191 08 Jan 2020

Last August I fell whilst bouldering at the plantation, i dislocated my foot and turned half of my talus to dust (the exact words of my consultant). I'm now 5 months post surgery and I'm making steady progress, however I'm weeks away from returning to jogging and possibly months away from proper bouldering fitness. I've dabbled a few times but the irrational fear of repeating the injury and the very rational fear of creating a new one have crippled my motivation, this isn't helped by climbing, especially indoors is for me intrinsically success and improvement led.  Has anyone else been in this position and how did you cope? Should I join a normal gym? The thought of repetetive excercise fills me with dread.

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deacondeacon 08 Jan 2020
In reply to Cbee20191:

Change your focus to trad or sport. Falling onto a rope is nicer for your talus than falling onto a pad. 

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konrad7272 08 Jan 2020
In reply to Cbee20191:

You could focus on fingerboarding, with the success being an extra second or extra kg of weight on your max hangs. You could also focus on improving your pull-ups/progressing to a one armer. That way, when you get back to climbing you will have improved strength. 

Aidan Roberts talks about doing something similar during injury on the arch climbing podcast and how he was surprised at how much he had improved while doing zero climbing.

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Cbee20191 09 Jan 2020

I think a change of focus might be the way to go, maybe a move toward sport and to suck it up and join a gym for a bit of general fitness.  I've tried fingerboarding but I don't think I have the motivation to goto the wall on cold winter nights right now for the repetetive training specific stuff

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simonacarr 09 Jan 2020
In reply to Cbee20191:

When I got injured for 6 months last year I took up reformer pilates as I get bored with repetitive weights routines. Having now come back to climbing I have a stronger, better adjusted climbing frame than before. Might not suit you but there are definitely other options than just hitting the gym.  

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jkarran 09 Jan 2020
In reply to Cbee20191:

I'd add to the folk suggesting a change of tack climbing wise. You can develop your fitness without overloading your foot or risking a landing on it.

Maybe also use the enforced time off climbing to do something else you might enjoy that doesn't risk exacerbating the injury (eg. a sport like canoeing or an evening class). You'll go back to climbing in a way you find rewarding when you're ready to, there's no need or point in rushing it.

jk

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iccle_bully 09 Jan 2020
In reply to konrad7272:

When I knackered my ankle I took to the finger board. When I was able to get a shoe on again I did loads of top roping/seconding. I also focused on doing the exercises the physio gave me. 

I went to the wall to meet friends for coffee, or just called in to say hello when there was a gang of them there as climbing was my social circle. When it was time to start bouldering again I took it steady and I practiced falling.

Good luck 

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im off 09 Jan 2020
In reply to Cbee20191:

Maybe get cycling instead of running. I've got arthritis in ankle from a fall years ago. Cycling is so much kinder to joints...maybe good physio for it to. 

I also agree with doing more routes than bouldering.

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