UKC

/ Training tips for shift workers?

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rockface - on 13 Dec 2017
Hi there,

So I work shifts (days, nights, weekends - always changing), so I have no routine. Beyond the "just climb" advice, can someone give me some tips on training, programs and fitting these around shifts; how do you do it? Climbing about 7a+ at the moment and I can't fit in more than 2-3 sessions a week (at the wall).
alx on 13 Dec 2017
In reply to rockface:

Buy a day light lamp, eye mask, ear plugs and learn to master sleep. Any training then at least won’t be wasted by lack of rest.
cwarby - on 14 Dec 2017
In reply to rockface:

Same organisation, different dept and similar issues. I'm not good enough to pretend to know how to coach you, but I only get to the wall 1-2X week so I concentrate on bouldering/moonboarding. I top up with a (Crusher - damn good) fingerboard at home. I'm guessing its how you train, not just volume. i.e have a plan. The moonboard is good cos I can peruse the app on teabreaks and make a list of potential problems for the next session - for me 6b+ - 7a+. Certainly I find it hard (probably age!) to climb after a shift; I worry about injuries when I'm tired, so would never push the limits then. Am interested in other replies and good luck.
Chris
Dandan82 - on 14 Dec 2017
In reply to rockface:

Aside from trying your hardest to get a good amount of sleep as mentioned above, I think you just need to plan ahead.
Assuming you get at least a weeks notice of your shifts, i'd write down a plan of when you can fit in your sessions for that week, then try your best to stick to it.

I only work 4 days a week and i've noticed that if I earmark a session for a Friday (my day off), i'll think "oh ive got all day, ill easily manage that" but if I don't specifically plan to do the session at a particular time, I can end up just faffing about all day or being distracted by other things and either miss the session entirely or rush to squeeze it in at a non-ideal time.
If you can't rely on a regular routine to tell you when to train, then I think a bit of forward planning is the next best thing.
ianstevens - on 14 Dec 2017
In reply to Dandan82:

Great suggestions, and that's what I also do.

As for training after work, I use this time for fingerboard sessions (when in the training plan). Not actually to strenuous on the body as a whole and lots of resting between sets of hangs, and mentally easy, so suits the tired body and mind well. Additionally, when ohangboardn the if yo get a hold "wrong" you an just drop off - on a boulder I find I'm more likely to try and push through when I get holds wrong (satisfaction of getting to the top of course) which is when injuries happen.
rockface - on 14 Dec 2017
In reply to cwarby:

Cheers. Good to hear your thoughts. I've been considering trying to stuff more climbing in after work, but now you mention injuries it probably wouldn't be very wise, but yourself and ianstevens sound like you're onto something with the fingerboard. Could fit that in after a dayshift shift. Not so keen on the moonboard, though when I already have little time for redpointing.
cwarby - on 14 Dec 2017
In reply to rockface:

If you have access, I would try moonboading. Took me a while to get used to a more dynamic style. My golden rule is if I hit the same hold on a problem and fall 3x consecutively, move on as you're more likely to get injured. There's plenty to go at. Don't get hung up on sandbag grades, filter on to benchmarks. And occasionally do the stupid graded routes for a laugh (i ve done 7c and graded it hard 6c+!!). Upping your ranking is another incentive. If you're having a solo session, I find it useful and a damn sight more fun than fingerboarding.
Chris
stp - on 14 Dec 2017
In reply to rockface:

I would think about constructing a modular training program. That is break up your training into a bunch of different modules. For example fingerboard, core, pull ups etc. Each module might only take 10m to 20m so easy to fit in when you've got a free bit of time. Try and repeat each one two or three times in a week. If you're struggling to get them all done then prioritize those that you feel are most important for you and at least make sure you get those done.

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