UKC

/ Electric bikes on charity rides

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
LastBoyScout on 05 Feb 2018

I've just entered a sponsored bike ride and, while idly skimming the entry details, was staggered to find they have a policy on electric bikes - in short, anyone using one must comply with the law.

Surely, if you're doing a sponsored event, the idea is that it's a challenge that you have to work for and not just rock up to the start on an e-bike?

Ok, I can understand that might be the only bike that some people own and I'm all for inclusivity for people wanting to get involved, but it just surprised me, considering the charity in question - the British Heart Foundation. I would have expected them to have been at the top of the list of organisers discouraging them.

In this case, it's only a 40 mile ride, although there are a couple of sharp climbs.

9
Chris the Tall - on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

Surely it's a matter for the rider and the people they are asking to sponsor them

I'm not keen on sponsored events - I haven't done one since my early teens - but I will sponsor other people, especially kids, if it's going to be a genuine challenge for them, and a good way of motivating them.

40 miles on a road bike is nothing to me, but to many people, even with an e-bike it would be pretty hard.  

 

thepodge on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

All they are interested in in money, if people wanted to do it on an elephant, as long as they collected sponsorship it'd be ok. 

And who says its not a challenge? Perhaps someone has had a heart attack and has been told they cant get above 100bpm but wants to do the ride on an electric bike to give back to the organisation that has helped them? Perhaps someone who has never ridden 40 miles wants to do it. Perhaps someone wants to do it and tow their child... perhaps someone who isn't as awesome as you wants to do it. 

Get over the idea that electric bikes are for the lazy. 

2
Climbing Pieman on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

> Surely, if you're doing a sponsored event, the idea is that it's a challenge that you have to work for and not just rock up to the start on an e-bike?

Oh dear you are obviously not disabled or less able bodied than the norm. 40 miles can be a big challenge for some. 

Disabled and less able bodies should be allow to be part and raise monies for charity if they wish?

thepodge on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to Climbing Pieman:

> Disabled and less able bodies should be allow to be part and raise monies for charity if they wish?

Yes but no, my wife neither disabled nor less able, she's is much more of a runner than a cyclist but is considering one so that we can ride together. Now if only I could get electric legs I'd be able to match her on the half marathon. 

 

jkarran - on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

> Surely, if you're doing a sponsored event, the idea is that it's a challenge that you have to work for and not just rock up to the start on an e-bike?

And what if 40m with a couple of big hills is a personal challenge even on an e-bike? Surely most charity runs/rides/races aren't an out of the ordinary challenge to those taking part, they're just an excuse to do something fun while beating the drum for one charitable cause or another.

> Ok, I can understand that might be the only bike that some people own and I'm all for inclusivity for people wanting to get involved, but it just surprised me, considering the charity in question - the British Heart Foundation. I would have expected them to have been at the top of the list of organisers discouraging them.

Why on earth would the British Heart Foundation be against people getting out on a bike, power assisted or not? They're not motorbikes and not everyone is young fit and able!

jk

LastBoyScout on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to several:

Ok, I perhaps should have put a bit more context in.

I did the same ride last year, supporting a couple of friends that were doing it. There was a pretty wide range of people on the course on a variety of bikes, including modified and other specialist bikes - I took a turn at pushing some sort of rickshaw for a while.

I was just surprised at the specific mention of e-bikes in the entry details, as I'm sure it wasn't there last year. There's no specific mention of tandems, recumbents, fixies, hand cycles or anything else, just that it needs to be "roadworthy".

deepsoup - on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

In addition to the points about accessibility made above, if someone is doing a sponsored event for charity and I decide to sponsor them, I'm donating to the charity not paying them to do the event.  I really don't care if they 'earn' my donation or not.

wintertree - on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

> I was just surprised at the specific mention of e-bikes in the entry details, as I'm sure it wasn't there last year. There's no specific mention of tandems, recumbents, fixies, hand cycles or anything else, just that it needs to be "roadworthy".

The big difference is that a pedal cycle with a legally non-compliant motor system puts the rider in breech of a serious set of laws - riding a motorbike without an MOT, riding a motorbike without insurance, riding a motorbike without tax (an offence even if £0 rated) and potentially riding a motorbike without a licence.  None of these apply to any other form of bike that you list.  Plenty of e-bike conversion kits for sale online to the UK are not legally compliant.  Hopefully this helps you understand the wording of the charity’s document.

Post edited at 12:48
1
LastBoyScout on 05 Feb 2018
In reply to wintertree:

> The big difference is that a pedal cycle with a legally non-compliant motor system puts the rider in breech of a serious set of laws

There are laws regarding the other forms of bike I listed, such as requiring 2 brakes on bikes where the saddle is more than 600mm from the ground, for example, but no mention of those. Not as serious, but still legal requirements. Why not just say "road worthy and road legal"?

 

2
bleddynmawr - on 06 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

I remember running my first half marathon many years ago. It was a 3 lap affair. As I ran up the last hill I saw a wheelchair racer ahead of me. I gradually caught him. Only when I caught him did I realize, in my addled state, that it was an electric wheelchair! By that time I was more jealous than annoyed!

Chris Harris - on 06 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

> I've just entered a sponsored bike ride and, while idly skimming the entry details, was staggered to find they have a policy on electric bikes - in short, anyone using one must comply with the law.

I always thought that anyone, doing anything, had to comply with the law. 

Otherwise, they'd be breaking the law.

 

 

The New NickB - on 06 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

I suspect the reason they are mentioned is the scope for them not being road legal, which won’t apply to most other adapted bikes.

Lord of Starkness - on 08 Feb 2018
In reply to LastBoyScout:

I know one or two 'club' riders that can be regularly seen out on e-bikes.  They are well in to their 80's and occasionally need a bit of help when going uphill!


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.