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Robust reading glasses for outdoor use

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episodit 09 Feb 2010
Probably not a problem for many here but do any of you know where I might find some reading glasses that could be carried around the neck and fairly robust so don't have to worry too much about them. Use folding pair of +3.00 to read a 25000 map comfortably at the moment but don't really like having the bother of taking gloves off etc. Also don't want to spend too much and don't wear glasses normally. Any help appreciated, ta.
 Trangia 09 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit:

Welcome to the club!

Glasses and climbing are a bad mix. They fall off, get caught on things, mist up and get water on the inside when it rains so you can't read a map. I'm told that contact lenses are the answer but I'm too much of a wimp to put things into my eyes.

So I struggle. I generally take them off to rock climb. I keep an old pair (the prescription before the current ones) for the hills.

I've also managed to sit on a pair and twist the frame in the confines of a tent.

Map reading in wind driven rain is a nightmare.
 Gandalf 09 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit:
contact lenses ar eok if you get used to them and as long as your not tired - if you're tired i find the itch alot

never had a problem with glasses, but then i have to wear them 100% of the time and you get used to them. my "secret" would have to be, dont buy cheap ones, and wear a sports band on them when climbing and oyu should beok (touch wood)
 Mr Fuller 09 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit: I wear glasses all the time and agree that you get used to it. They are at their worst when it's cold and wet as they steam up like its a sauna. Goggles are a great help. If you're a +3 then you may want to just wear them all the time, as this will stop the problem of breaking them when they're round your neck.
episodit 09 Feb 2010
In reply to Mr Fuller:
> (In reply to episodit) I wear glasses all the time and agree that you get used to it. They are at their worst when it's cold and wet as they steam up like its a sauna. Goggles are a great help. If you're a +3 then you may want to just wear them all the time, as this will stop the problem of breaking them when they're round your neck.

I can get away with +2.5 but really it's so that I can read detail on maps more clearly. Don't require glasses normally other than for computer and these are lower power.
 Jones 09 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit:
Oakley make prescription lenses. Can get pricey though.
Oakley Half Jackets: http://www.oakley.com/pd/2081/10453?sliver Expect to pay £100+
Prescription Lenses: http://www.theinternetopticians.co.uk/oakley-half-jacket-lenses-prescription_p-3072.html?ref=base £144
£250+ for glasses to wear on the hills.
episodit 09 Feb 2010
In reply to Jones:
> (In reply to episodit)
> Oakley make prescription lenses. Can get pricey though.
> Oakley Half Jackets: http://www.oakley.com/pd/2081/10453?sliver Expect to pay £100+
> Prescription Lenses: http://www.theinternetopticians.co.uk/oakley-half-jacket-lenses-prescription_p-3072.html?ref=base £144
> £250+ for glasses to wear on the hills.

Don't really want to spend that amount just for map-reading, the Clic ones look quite promising for about £35.
 Solaris 09 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit:

Harvey maps do a very light fresnel lens magnifying glass and I find for map reading that is useful to have tucked away somewhere attached to its pocket with a bit of 3mm. Not as good as glasses, mind!
mountain monster 09 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit:
Why not get a couple of pairs from Aldi,Lidl, Poundland etc? If they get lost, who cares? If they get trashed, who cares?
episodit 09 Feb 2010
In reply to mountain monster:

True, but I don't really like the flimsy arms on these kind of glasses and the retainers necessary. I want them to be available quickly without having to search them out etc. Anything incorporating a strap like the Clic's is appealing. Currently I have some that fold twice so occupy very small space and come in a solid little case so it will have to be something better for me to abandon them.
 Rob Exile Ward 09 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit: A totally off the wall suggestion is to use varifocal sunglasses or specs with Transition lenses - which is what I do - or convert your favourite sunglasses to bifocals using stick on inserts:

http://www.radyr-eyecare.co.uk/index_files/Page632.htm

(Bottom of the page).
episodit 10 Feb 2010
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:
> (In reply to episodit) A totally off the wall suggestion is to use varifocal sunglasses or specs with Transition lenses - which is what I do - or convert your favourite sunglasses to bifocals using stick on inserts:
>
> http://www.radyr-eyecare.co.uk/index_files/Page632.htm
>
> (Bottom of the page).

Ta, they look quite interesting but I hope to cater for all conditions and I don't normally wear any glasses .. probably expensive too ..
 David Bennett 10 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit: Don't laugh but have you thought about a monocle if it's just for map reading. (cheap, small, on a lanyard). You could also add Optx 2020 stick in lenses to sunglasses / goggles as required.
episodit 10 Feb 2010
In reply to David Bennett:
> (In reply to episodit) Don't laugh but have you thought about a monocle if it's just for map reading. (cheap, small, on a lanyard). You could also add Optx 2020 stick in lenses to sunglasses / goggles as required.

Haha, no actually I wouldn't laugh at any suggestion and yours is quite sensible too but I do prefer the wider vision enabled with glasses. The previous poster suggested a site that had something similar and stick-on lenses might work quite well. Will have to investigate the costs.
In reply to episodit:

I need glasses to read spot heights etc but tend to use the 'magnifying glass' on my compass.
episodit 10 Feb 2010
In reply to jon:
> (In reply to episodit)
>
> I need glasses to read spot heights etc but tend to use the 'magnifying glass' on my compass.

I'll probably need some magnification to read my compass as I've just gone and bought a Suunto M9 because I realised I wasn't checking the compass as much as I should. Will not have that option now since it will be on my wrist. Stems from years being out with others and although have good knowledge of navigation techniques I haven't really needed to practice them until recently as out on my own more often now.
episodit 10 Feb 2010
In reply to David Bennett:
> (In reply to episodit) Don't laugh but have you thought about a monocle if it's just for map reading. (cheap, small, on a lanyard). You could also add Optx 2020 stick in lenses to sunglasses / goggles as required.

I think I'll give these Optx 2020 lenses a go, hopefully will need sunglasses this summer, thanks.
 Solaris 10 Feb 2010
In reply to Solaris:
> (In reply to episodit)
>
> Harvey maps do a very light fresnel lens magnifying glass

Here you go:
http://www.harveymaps.co.uk/acatalog/Romers_and_magnifiers.html

You'll need a lanyard on it if you're going to use it in high winds in gloved hands.
episodit 11 Feb 2010
In reply to Solaris:
> (In reply to Solaris)
> [...]
>
> Here you go:
> http://www.harveymaps.co.uk/acatalog/Romers_and_magnifiers.html
>
> You'll need a lanyard on it if you're going to use it in high winds in gloved hands.

Mmm, I think I have something similar in my wallet. Certainly cheap but at least specs enable one to use both hands for other things .. still my favourite option.
 Solaris 11 Feb 2010
In reply to episodit:
Yes, if you need to set a bearing, specs are pretty essential. I use the lens mainly if I'm out running on paths where bearings aren't needed.

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