UKC

/ Navigation help with map scales 1:25k vs 1:50K

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Kemics - on 02 Jun 2018

Im revising for a navigation exam, one topic they advise you cover is know 5 unique features of 1:25k and 1:50k maps (and the advantages and disadvantages of both)

 

I know 1:25k shows look out/vistas as a map icon (points of interest? not exactly sure what it would be called) and 1:25k shows minor paths. 

Does anyone know any others? 

 

 

Advantage of 1:25K is it shows more details, advantage of 1:50k is by showing less individual terrain features the "shape of the land" shows better through contours. 

 

Any help from you nav wizards would be great! 

Mike-W-99 on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Some 1:25k maps have 5m contours.

Welsh Kate - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

They show PROWs in different colours (Green on 1:25k, red on 1:50k). Not sure why, and doubtful whether there's any benefit to this, but there you go.

Welsh Kate - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

1:25k shows access land (shaded for open country, brighter green for woodland and forestry); 1:50k doesn't bother.

MG - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Field boundaries on 1:25k is the most obvious and useful.

They do a much better job with small streams too. 

Post edited at 18:28
keith-ratcliffe on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

I agree with MG on field boundaries. If you want to see an example of the difference look at the walk on the Dales Way from Grassington to Kettlewell on the two scales. The number of field crossings (in this part of the world mainly stiles) on this short walk is patently obvious on the 1:25k map. It also deals with antiquities in more detail - this can be seen clearly on this stretch of the walk.

Post edited at 18:37
girlymonkey - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

1:25k maps mark marshland.

keith-ratcliffe on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

This thread has prompted me to dig out my set of maps of the Yorkshire area produced by Arthur Gemmell. They were sometimes referred to as 'stile maps' as that item dominates many of the lower level walks in the area. They are a good example of a map containing only those features that are most important to the walker. The maps covering the dales have no contours as most of the walks are along less steep ground. They are masterpieces of graphic design - not surprising as Arthur was an architect by profession. I treasure these items and still use them when in that part of the world. I apologise for this diversion from your original request but thought it relevant to a wider understanding of the map makers craft.

summo on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Differentiating boulders, scree, small cliffs and outcrops  etc.. 

DancingOnRock - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Ponds and sometimes individual rocks and ring contours. Windfarms.

I’d get one of each types of maps and compare the keys. 

Walking 1:25k

cycling 1:50k 

Post edited at 19:55
Billhook - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Isn't it much simpler to look at 1:25,000 & a 1:50,000 map yourself and look for yourself - its far better learning!

Both maps show all public footpaths,bridleways, if thats what you meant by 'minor' paths.

You might also notice that the 1:25,000 maps show field boundaries. etc., etc.,

1
FactorXXX - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

One advantage of a 1:50k is that it covers four times the area for the same physical size of paper.

Kemics - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Billhook:

I am looking, but it's quite hard to see what's not there .. rather than what is ;) 

 

To be Frank on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to FactorXXX:

> One advantage of a 1:50k is that it covers four times the area for the same physical size of paper.


Hell's bells, how far do you walk in a day?

Kemics - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to all:

thanks everyone for the help! Definitely given me lots to go with 

 

wintertree - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

50k shows fancy stately gardens in block grey, 25k shows their contents.

MG - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to wintertree:

1:50k don't show Civil Parish boundaries. 

captain paranoia - on 02 Jun 2018
In reply to MG:

> 1:50k don't show Civil Parish boundaries.

Which confuse DofE participants who plan their routes following them in the 1:25k maps...

Which reminds me: power lines that aren't 133 or 400kV lines. Had one team plan a route following dual 33kV lines across a lake...

Billhook - on 03 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Just a quick look at the two maps different scales and the same location :-

1;25,000 gives names of roads, names of features ("Mary Magdalene Well, v. 'well') 

1,25,000 gives ground vegetation cover much better

More features are named

Better building footprint marked

More accurate scale  representation of small objects, such as roads, houses, and footpaths etc., V.  1.50,000 are NOT an exact scale representation of what is there as you wouldn't necessarily be able to see small features if their scale was accurate, as anyone who has compared a map to an aerial photo of the same physical size.  (My house appears to be over 90 ft long on the 1.50,000 map, which it isn't!)

summo on 03 Jun 2018
In reply to Billhook:

One thing for certain is UK 1:25000 maps are a phenomenal piece of work. You can navigate to the tiniest kink in a stream or contour and when you get there it will be visible on the ground. All done long before handheld gps, Google earth etc..  and certainly as good or better than any other countries efforts. 

MG - on 03 Jun 2018
In reply to summo:

>  and certainly as good or better than any other countries efforts. 

Raises hand. Swiss maps at 1:25 (and 1:50) are better. Works of art. 

 

summo on 03 Jun 2018
In reply to MG:

> >  and certainly as good or better than any other countries efforts. 

> Raises hand. Swiss maps at 1:25 (and 1:50) are better. Works of art. 

Better or equal..?.. ;) I'm talking mapping, not pretty colours.

Edits. Harvey's maps of something like the Skye ridge are prettier, but not necessarily more accurate in detail than os. Just a different scale. 

Post edited at 15:23
Name Changed 34 - on 03 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Power transmission line pylons and poles differ  

pylons showong the true locashion --- if I remember corectly 

Ridge - on 03 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

Contours lines. Due to the scale of the 1:50k maps it's not possible to fit all the 10m contour lines in if the slope is very steep, so lines get omitted on very steep ground. As a general rule if more than 1 contour line is missing the slope is likely to be a bit iffy to descend.

Edit. Also tourist info in blue on the 1:25k maps is for info only, don't try and navigate by it.

Post edited at 22:44
Dingerbell on 09 Jun 2018
In reply to Kemics:

I use my my 1.50 for route planning and 1.25 navigating, in fact ive just started using the A-Z 1.25 in a book miles easier then folding and unfolding big maps also I like the 1.25 harveys supermaps good for contours rather than the 1.40 if you want to stay on the scale of 1.25.

climb41 on 10 Jun 2018
In reply to Dingerbell:

> in fact ive just started using the A-Z 1.25 in a book miles easier then folding and unfolding big maps

Thanks for this. Didn’t know they did that.  Had a look at the website and just ordered my first one.

 

Ridge - on 15 Jun 2018
In reply to Welsh Kate:

> They show PROWs in different colours (Green on 1:25k, red on 1:50k). Not sure why, and doubtful whether there's any benefit to this, but there you go.

What about green diamonds on peak footpaths?

Post edited at 11:50

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