UKC

/ Irish citizenship

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henwardian - on 13 Mar 2018

If you have applied for Irish citizenship to get around brexit (Irish parent or grandparent), how long did it take to get?

Just wondering because I applied recently and was wondering how long it is realistically taking (like, is it really taking as long as it suggests it might on the site?)

3
MG - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

A few months. Not excessive 

Jenny C on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

Might I ask what the cost is if you live in the UK? Have looked online and can only find costs if you live in Ireland. 

Also can you apply online/post or do you have to go to the embassy to apply in person?

MG - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to Jenny C:

You can apply by post.  You will need various documents and also a signature from a list of (rather odd) professions, such as Priest, Head Teacher etc.  The cost is somewhat less than a UK passport.

https://www.dfa.ie/irish-embassy/great-britain/passports/how-to-apply-for-a-passport/

Skip - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

Fortunately I've had an Irish passport for about 20 years.

henwardian - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to Jenny C:

> Might I ask what the cost is if you live in the UK? Have looked online and can only find costs if you live in Ireland. 

270 euros

> Also can you apply online/post or do you have to go to the embassy to apply in person?

Fill out an online form (quite short) and then post a long list of documents and signed stuff off in the post. You can get missing birth/marriage/death certs from Scotland and England for about £10 each. In the case of Scotland it's really easy, int he case of england, it's more awkward but the details are easily googleable.

Skip - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

> 270 euros

Really?

Cost about a third of that when I renewed about 18 months ago

 

Jenny C on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to MG:

Thankyou. 

Luckily my granny never threw anything away so I think we have most of the documents, with the exception of a couple of birth certificates where we only have the shortened versions. 

MG - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to Skip:

> Really?

> Cost about a third of that when I renewed about 18 months ago

No, it's much less. 

Jenny C on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

I think it's just my birth certificate (England) and my grandads (Ireland, before partition) that we are missing. Have all the relevant marriage and death certificates. 

Welsh Kate - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

I applied recently, sent my forms off in early December and am waiting for my papers to come through the postbox

At the moment I'm just hoping that the Royal Mail Special Delivery packet with all my documents in it made it to the embasssy!

henwardian - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to Welsh Kate:

> At the moment I'm just hoping that the Royal Mail Special Delivery packet with all my documents in it made it to the embasssy!

I sent mine to the Edinburgh embassy and they e-mailed me to confirm that they had got the documents, hmm, maybe a week or two after I sent them... if you didn't get an e-mail, might be worth chasing it up to check.

henwardian - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to Skip:

> Really?

> Cost about a third of that when I renewed about 18 months ago

I think you are thinking about passports which cost 80 euros. I'm discussing citizenship which you only ever have to do once.

MG - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

Ah, I was talking about passports.  However, if you have an Irish parent (not sure about grandparent) you are an Irish citizen, it appears.  So no need to apply for that, just get a passport.  Irish includes being born in NI, as my mother was, fortunately.

Post edited at 09:07
steve taylor - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to MG:

> Ah, I was talking about passports.  However, if you have an Irish parent (not sure about grandparent) you are an Irish citizen, it appears.  So no need to apply for that, just get a passport.  Irish includes being born in NI, as my mother was, fortunately.


What about step-mum? That's the only link I've got, but willing to grasp a straws!

henwardian - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to steve taylor:

Welllll, everything I've read refers to your mother so, assuming your step-mum is married to your father, I think it should work... might be best to phone Ireland and ask first.

henwardian - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to MG:

Might be different with a parent. Definitely need to apply to be on the "registry of foreign births" if it's a grandparent though and that is what the 270 euros is for. I have another 80 euros to look forward to shelling out to get the passport!

auld al on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to henwardian:

So, I live in Northern Ireland and I am a U.K. citizen and have a U.K. passport - I would be entitled apparently to apply for a Southern Irish passport - what advantage would this give me  - or us at the moment

Bogwalloper - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to auld al:

I guess it won't really affect you because when you're on holiday and someone asks you where you're from you can say Ireland. If you don't mention the northern bit nobody will ever know you're a UK citizen.

For the rest of us we have to be able to say England without showing any embarrassment

W

1
aln - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to auld al:

> I live in Northern Ireland and I am a U.K. citizen and have a U.K. passport - I would be entitled apparently to apply for a Southern Irish passport - what advantage would this give me  - or us at the moment

FTFY

 

MG - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to auld al:

Confidence you will be able to live, work and travel freely in the EU in the future. The ability to abandon an increasingly inward looking, small-minded, xenophobic-run UK, if needed.

1
pete osullivan on 15 Mar 2018
In reply to MG:

You can apply for a passport if one of your grandparents was born in the island of Ireland it just costs more

 

Post edited at 15:20
aln - on 15 Mar 2018
In reply to pete osullivan:

> You can apply for a passport if one of your grandparents was born in the island of Ireland it just costs more

I didn't know that. My Granda was Irish, how much is it and can I still have my British passport or is it one or the other? 

1
MG - on 15 Mar 2018
In reply to aln:

You can have both, no problem.

Jenny C on 15 Mar 2018
In reply to aln:

You have to register your birth which aparantly costs 280euro and requires you to provide birth and marriage certificates linking you to your Irish grandparent.

Dual UK Irish citizenship is allowed. 

If you want an Irish passport that is around 80 euros, although I guess one you've got that you might not need to renew your GB one. 

pete osullivan on 22 Mar 2018
In reply to aln:

I don't know the exact price but you can find out online and yes you can still keep your British passport

RX-78 on 22 Mar 2018
In reply to auld al:

No such thing as a Southern Irish passport. Neither is there a Western Irish passport for those lucky sods in Connacht. I guess you mean Republic of Ireland passport?


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