/ Threading threads on lead

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petegunn on 19 Jun 2017
Hi
Does anyone have any nifty way of threading a thread with 6mm cord whilst on lead?
Has to be done one handed and only a thin cord will fit, as a doubled slim sling won't fit.
Cheers
Dangerous Dave - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Fairly common to have them pre-placed, get a mate to do it if you want to save the onsight properly.
MikeYouCanClimb - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

This takes me back to the days before people started leaving threads in situ as the norm.

I used to carry a cut down coat hanger about 4-6 inches with a hook in the end.
I also used to carry a wire with the nut removed, makes a perfect thead to clip one handed on lead.
Chris Craggs - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

We used to use a stiff piece of wire bent into a hook (a Beeston Broddler) back in the day. A nut key also can work if the end isn't too thick,


Chris
petegunn on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to MikeYouCanClimb:
I can push the cord through ok its just doing the knot one handed Iam finding tricky
I have tried having a stopper/ double fisherman's already in one end so I can push the cord through and then just tie an overhand knot one handed.
Any other ways?
Post edited at 16:05
Dangerous Dave - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Longer rope and tie an overhand or fig 8 if possible?
Should manage either of those one handed?
MikeYouCanClimb - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:
The nut method means you have a loop that you can clip in direct, this can be extended so no need for cord to knot.

You can tie a knot one handed but it is fiddly. Still it is better to push or pull a doubled piece of cord that is pre-tied and clip in to that.
Post edited at 16:16
3leggeddog on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

The easy answer is to preplace it.

If you must place on lead then there are a few options.

Sharpen the end of the cord by melting and shaping to a point the rest for a week while your fingertips recover from the burns.

Tape a length of fuse wire to the end of the cord to add stiffness, leaving some write protruding as a pilot.

If the thread is short enough use a no 1 wire with the nut pushed upto the swage.

All rather bothersome seeing as you have collected the beta already, ab down and preplace it.
taddersandbadger - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Hi Pete,
Apart from the coat hanger trick already mentioned, l have found micro nuts very handy for this. Have the pre tied thread with the nut attached, slung over your shoulder, so that you can remove it one handed and poke the micronut through the thread (some need help from a nut key on the other side - but quite often you can catch the nut) then clip the two loops.

The nuts can be pre threaded or looped through sort of like a larks foot if you want them to be removable, but a little less secure.

No good for really deep threads, but a good use for those 1kn rated psychological bits of pro that would otherwise be hanging of the rear view mirror.
Paul
Ian Parsons - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

- Use a stiff cord; clearly easier to thread than a floppy one.
- Carry it singly - ie not knotted into a loop; again, easier to thread. Can be carried lark's footed to a harness gear loop for easy accessibility; just pull on the middle of the lark's foot to remove.
- Carry a length that's a couple of feet longer than what you actually need to tie a knot - ie perhaps 5ft instead of 3ft; it's easier to tie the subsequent one-handed knot if the ends are long.
- After threading, hold the two ends together and tie an overhand - as you would connect two ropes for abseiling. Having clipped in there should be enough spare to tie a backup second overhand, if nervous - but this is somewhat unnecessary as this configuration has been a fairly standard way of equipping small threads in parts of continental Europe for many years.
purplemonkeyelephant - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Why not get some of that super stiff aramid stuff, poke a bight through the hole and then larks foot it with the other side and a biner?
taddersandbadger - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Soz was typing my reply when you posted that you were having to thread them then tie! Sounds like pretty tiny threads! I think 6mm is as thin as I would go for falling on. Overhand knot and long tails is fine for abbing but not sure I would like to fall on one! Will have a think...
AlanLittle - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to purplemonkeyelephant:
If a bight of aramid cord passes through, then he could just use a sewn aramid cord sling.

On limestone I'd be a bit worried using a wire about it cutting the rock, unless the rock is plenty thick.
Post edited at 16:41
Rick Graham on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Perhaps practice one handed and see what stiffness cord is easiest.

Melt one end into a point and also slightly scorch the first section after the point so it is stiffer and pre-curved.

Tie a loop at the other end so the only one handed bit is a few half hitches.
SenzuBean - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to 3leggeddog:

> Sharpen the end of the cord by melting and shaping to a point the rest for a week while your fingertips recover from the burns.

Pro-tip - use a bit of cardboard so you don't burn your precious fingertips ;)

Rick Graham on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

or heat up an old knife on a gas stove.
jimtitt - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Kevlar cord is stiffer than nylon and traditionally one can insert a length of wire into it (about 12-18") to help threading. Then tie an overhand with long tails.
Trevor Langhorne on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Try a long and stiff cable tie cinched tightly onto the sling that is being used as a thread. The tie slips through the hole a treat with the added bonus of, in the event of a fall, no danger of a length of stiffening wire lodging up somewhere uncomfortable! Personally I prefer tape to rope for use in threads as it is much more supple.
bpmclimb on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

> Does anyone have any nifty way of threading a thread with 6mm cord whilst on lead?
> Has to be done one handed and only a thin cord will fit, as a doubled slim sling won't fit.

FWIW in this case I would preplace the thread (assuming you can get to it on abseil) - since you have all that information about the placement, it's not going to be a pure onsight anyway.
scott titt - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:
In Saxony they use a lot of threads. For small holes they use a long piece of aramid cord and tie an overhand knot, they are adept at tying overhand knots in stress situations.
Toerag - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to 3leggeddog:

> Sharpen the end of the cord by melting and shaping to a point the rest for a week while your fingertips recover from the burns.

You're supposed to wet your fingers before using them to shape the melted end. I normally use spit.

MischaHY - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to Dangerous Dave:

> Fairly common to have them pre-placed, get a mate to do it if you want to save the onsight properly.

But then that wouldn't be the onsight, surely ;)
Dave Kerr - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

Has this been suggested for the tying problem?

Pre-tied fig 8 loop in one end. Thread other and tie a fig 8 or overhand in it one handed. Clip both loops.
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bettypastie - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to petegunn:

These are meant to be for stuff like that... Don't know if they would be any use for your situation though.
http://www.upandunder.co.uk/Outdoor/Climbing/Slings-and-Extenders/Dyneema/P---Aramid-Cord-Sling-6mm-...

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