/ Porridge

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Greenbanks - on 04 Oct 2017
Well, I have just had my bowl of Flahavan's organic porridge oats. In my mind, the guv'nor when it comes to such things. Add a little salt, demerara and top with a tablespoon of cream. Fantastic.

Mmm. Should this be a Premium Post?
AP Melbourne on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

Och, shut up Godber awroite.
Mr MacKay.
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

You should try their multi seed porridge oats. Delicious!
bedspring on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

Well if gruel is your bag crack on. I prefer some scrambled eggs on wholemeal with smoked salmon, now thats a premium post.
Ben Sharp - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

You don't get the full scottish experience unless it's tesco value oats imo (which are delicious anyway). An oat's an oat, count yer pennies.
andyjohnson0 - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

I really want to like porridge because it seems like an ideal breakfast food. But every time I try it, even when made by a proper chef in a good hotel, its just horrible glop. As one of my kids said when they were young: "porridge is horridge".
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

I thought this was going to be about the BBC remaking the classic comedy series.
ian caton on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

Best flavour, but too many husks, don't buy it anymore.
Wingnut - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to andyjohnson0:

Yes, always looks to me like someone sneezed it into being.
graeme jackson - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to andyjohnson0:

> even when made by a proper chef in a good hotel,

A proper chef in a proper hotel wouldn't have a clue. Only your granny can make it properly then you have to hope she passes the secret on to your ma. If you're really lucky your wife will have been brought up in Glasgow and will have had the same experience. Either way, it'll still be tasteless slop. Crunchy nut cornflakes all the way.
LastBoyScout on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

Wasn't impressed with Flahavans when I bought them - awful runny texture.

We have porridge a lot in our house - daughter loves it, although I think it's partly an excuse to dip spoons into tins of syrup/black treacle and dribble a sticky mess all over the place
Greenbanks - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to LastBoyScout:

That's strange...success every time for me. Too much water/milk?Add bilberries, bananas or rasberries for an exotic finish. Never a fan of syrup in porridge.

Ben Sharp: I've had good experience with 'value' oats too.
wercat on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

or rum and sultanas with a little dash of cocoa
GrahamD - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to wercat:

Mascarpone sugar is all you need. Darker the better.
Timmd on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Wingnut:

> Yes, always looks to me like someone sneezed it into being.

lol - as they say.
plyometrics - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to wercat:

Or a massive spoonful of peanut butter. Beautiful.
Greenbanks - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to plyometrics:

> Or a massive spoonful of peanut butter. Beautiful.

Each to their own. This sounds totally disgusting...
Heike - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to andyjohnson0:
> I really want to like porridge because it seems like an ideal breakfast food. But every time I try it, even when made by a proper chef in a good hotel, its just horrible glop. As one of my kids said when they were young: "porridge is horridge".

Same here! To me it's something you got when you were ill when I was a kid. In Germany it even has a hideous name...Haferschleim...which translates to oat phlegm or oat slime However, my son, now 8 lives off it, to be fair I don't cook it, I buy the ready mix stuff you put into the microwave for half a minute (which is probably hideous to the aficionado). I fling in a few raisins and banana chips and he is happy! And it's healthy. Served up with a cup of warm milk/cocoa. All the things that would make me run a mile...
Post edited at 14:01
Welsh Kate - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

Maple syrup in porridge - yum yum. Especially after one of our Canadian colleagues has been on a trip home and come back with some top quality produce.
Pyreneenemec - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

I was most surprised the other day to find Flahavan's in my local Intermarché supermarket. I didn't buy any as I've never liked porridge BUT you make it sound quite delicious and as only fools don't change their minds..................


We were in Kilmacthomas last April, having cycled the greenway from Dungarvan. There is a lovely view of Flahavans factory from the old railway viaduct, completed by an old semaphore signal.
Greenbanks - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

You will not regret your decision! Nice to know such lovely stuff (amongst all the rest...) is available in your neck of the woods (which I'm assuming is in or around Pyrenees)
RX-78 on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

no salt, , brown sugar, cinnamon and some raisins, now I also add oatley instead of milk, seems appropriate. I make the porridge at home, I usually do not have it in hotels, never as good.
nufkin - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to RX-78:

> oatley instead of milk, seems appropriate

I dunno, I think there's something in Leviticus that proscribes this sort of behaviour. Adding insult to injury, kind of thing
BrendanO - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to GrahamD:

> Mascarpone sugar


I thought that was...cheese?
Toerag - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

What's all this poncy porridge oats talk for? ReadyBrek with instant hot chocolate powder in it made thick is where it's at! It's my standard wild camping breakfast - freezer bag of ReadyBrek, cadburys instant hot choc powder, dried milk and sugar. The only downside is the effort required to clean the bowl after.
If anyone finds porridge too slimy then they should try rommegrot, the Norwegian soured cream equivalent of porridge. Tastes good though.
marsbar - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to graeme jackson:

My Grandad made great porridge when I was a kid. I don't remember him cooking anything else for us, but in the mornings he would make proper porridge in a pan, no microwave in those days. My Grandma was quite impatient so maybe he did it so it wouldn't get burnt?
Greenbanks - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Toerag:

Bowl-cleaning never a challenge for committed porridge-eaters. I revert to the substitute porridge-in-a-pot (Quaker mostly) - just add the water. My only problem has been passing busy bodies, who take exception to my lobbing empty cartons into the heather of Hollow Stones
JMarkW - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to BrendanO:

Muscovado maybe?
doz on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

oats n water - any other additives is just softness
Well 'ard me an the little dozs......
Greenbanks - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to doz:

Got some Scottish friends, brought up on the savoury variet - oats, salt & water with added pepper. Now - that's hard
GrahamD - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to BrendanO:

> I thought that was...cheese?

Ooops - it is. possibly Muscovado sugar is what I meant. I blaim my spill checjker.
cousin nick on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

I sometimes make it with medium oatmeal rather than rolled oats and use 50/50 water and full cream milk. Honey is the usual additive, though I may add seasonal fresh fruit from the garden (blueberries, raspberries or grated apple).
Don't own a microwave so always make it in a pan, allowing the oats to soak in cold water overnight. To reduce washing up I always eat it direct from the pan (wife disowns me at this point!).
Greenbanks - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to cousin nick:

Not a fan of Pan Direct. It somehow gives a quite different taste...
BrendanO - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:
BREAKING NEWS!! World Porridge championship won by Swede!!!


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-41539322
Post edited at 09:43
Greenbanks - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to BrendanO:
Must be depressing being a Scot this Monday - no porridge trophy, no football World Cup in Russia next year

Mind you, not as depressing as for us poor English, having to endure the boredom and humiliation of taking part
;-)
Post edited at 10:39
wercat on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to BrendanO:
in 1969 it was an Irishman, in Corby!

http://apollo11.spacelog.org/page/02:04:00:02/

go to time 02 05 56 39 (dd hh mm ss time into mission)


and then the follow up comments about Aldrin
Post edited at 11:30
captain paranoia - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to wercat:

That was eating, not making, IIRC...
wercat on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to captain paranoia:

ah, yes
stubbed on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to Heike:

The microwave stuff normally has additional sugar in it. All kids love that.
I really want to like it too, and despite cooking it all the time for my family, I just can't get over the texture. Have tried for years. Best I can do is eat oats raw with milk or yoghurt.
Greenbanks - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to stubbed:

The Quaker pots into which you pour hot water have helped keep me sane during a 3-year project in China, requiring frequent field visits. I really do not like Chinese food - a supply of these things (along with energy bars) saved the day. I'd never eat one at home though
FactorXXX - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to BrendanO:

BREAKING NEWS!! World Porridge championship won by Swede!!!

Didn't Annabel Chong hold that a few years back?
stubbed on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

Maybe that is what will help me through my project in China next year. Just have to get past the texture first.
krikoman - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to FactorXXX:

> BREAKING NEWS!! World Porridge championship won by Swede!!!

> Didn't Annabel Chong hold that a few years back?

Dirty boy!!
Jimbo C - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to Greenbanks:

The best porridge I ever had was made with just whole rolled oats simmered and stirred in water for nearly an hour with a little salt. Made in a huge batch by an elderly Scottish woman who ran a hostel in the Highlands (sadly I can't remember which one).

I think slimy porridge happens when you add too much dairy. The quick cook, finely milled oats can be nice, but they can't beat the traditional slow method.
Ann S on 23:59 Sat
In reply to Jimbo C:

She was doing the fast food variety. My father, a Scot, said his mother cooked the porridge the night before, then poured it into a drawer in the kitchen table, lined with wax proof paper. The porridge would set overnight and in the morning they would cut themselves a slice and eat it cold. His father would dip a spoonful of porridge into a cup of milk and absolutely NO sugar.

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