/ Gove listens to experts

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MG - on 09 Nov 2017
MarkJH - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to MG:
> A welcome a change of heart

To some extent. I think the balance of evidence suggesting a real-world effect of exposure has shifted quite a bit over the last year or two (and I think that the researchers have done a good job of showing that sub-lethal exposure at realistic levels can negatively affect colonies), but there still hasn't been anything published demonstrating a real ecological effect. It is also worth noting that the two Science papers do not separate exposure due to application on flowering crops vs cereals, which is a crucial distinction for a total ban.

It would be interesting to know if anyone has been collecting data on European Bee populations since the ban in 2013, and whether or not that had substantial effects on colony health.
Post edited at 09:48
James Mann - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to MG:

It’s a crying shame he didn’t when as Secretary of State for education he irrevocably destroyed our education system through inappropriate performance measures, a backward curriculum and privatisation. A smug, poorly informed dickhead.

James
4
DerwentDiluted - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to James Mann:

So you are saying that as Sectretary for Education he gets a U, but for environment he gets a... Bee+
krikoman - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

> So you are saying that as Sectretary for Education he gets a U, but for environment he gets a... Bee+

I think he was suggesting Michael Gove is a C
3
john arran - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to krikoman:

> I think he was suggesting Michael Gove is a C

... and merits an FU
1
neilh - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to
From memory he was rated highly as a minister for justice as well.

Goves problem is his demeanour, it does not sit well with most people.
krikoman - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to neilh:

> Goves problem is his demeanour, it does not sit well with most people.

Yes, that's it, his demeanour, and the fact he's a two faced, back/ (front)-stabbing bastard.
1
oldie - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to krikoman:
> Yes, that's it, his demeanour, and the fact he's a two faced, back/ (front)-stabbing bastard. <

He's known to be a fan of Game of Thrones with its Machiavellian treachery etc. Possibly he's been learning from it, or maybe he doesn't need to.
1
Dave Garnett - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to oldie:

> He's known to be a fan of Game of Thrones with its Machiavellian treachery etc. Possibly he's been learning from it, or maybe he doesn't need to.

He should check whether Theresa May has a feisty little sister.
Ramblin dave - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to neilh:

> In reply to

> From memory he was rated highly as a minister for justice as well.

Yes - I think he was generally respected for listening to, erm, experts, and doing sensible, evidence-based stuff with a focus on reducing re-offending. His big problem at Education, as far as I can tell, was that he went in with a strong idea that he knew better than anyone else what would be for the best, ignored any evidence to the contrary, and made a spectacular hash of things as a result.

Also, it's always worth reposting:
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/cartoon/2012/mar/16/1

> Goves problem is his demeanour, it does not sit well with most people.

Yeah that and the pound-shop Iago routine, as noted above.
1
galpinos on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to neilh:

> In reply to

> From memory he was rated highly as a minister for justice as well.

> Goves problem is his demeanour, it does not sit well with most people.

He is a conviction politician. He does, very much, what he thinks is right and he gets things done. If you agree with what he's doing, you'll think he's great, if you disagree........

With education, his views contradicted many of the views held within the profession but with justice, his views coincided with the profession, hence the differing opinions.

I think the Brexit voting farmers are going to be in for a tough time when he rips up the subsidies they thought would role over from the CAP........
galpinos on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to Ramblin dave:

> Also, it's always worth reposting:


My favourite political cartoon.

> Yeah that and the pound-shop Iago routine, as noted above.

I still can't decide whether it wasn't done in collusion with BJ. BJ decides it's not the right time and Gove (who would neer win a leadership contest) agrees to fall on his sword by pretending to stab him in the back with an eye on a big role when BJ does get in.

neilh - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to galpinos:

Are not all politicians conviction based anyway?Its part of the job so to speak.

Disagreeing with teachers is like reforming the nhs...no matter what you lose in the end.
1
galpinos on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to neilh:

> Are not all politicians conviction based anyway?Its part of the job so to speak.

I wouldn't class, say BJ as a conviction politician, he will do whatever is required to improve his own position/career. Gove does what he thinks is best for education/justice/agriculture, it just depends on whether you agree as to whether he's right or not.

> Disagreeing with teachers is like reforming the nhs...no matter what you lose in the end.

I agree to a point, however there are few whole would defend his time as education secretary, regardless of political hue.....

RomTheBear on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to galpinos:
> I think the Brexit voting farmers are going to be in for a tough time when he rips up the subsidies they thought would role over from the CAP........

Well he wants to scrap tarrifs on imported agricultural products to make them cheaper.

I happen to think that for the overall economy, given the right circumstances, it’s not a bad idea, but it will wipe out many farms. Not sure this is what the farmers wanted when they put their brexit vote in the ballot box...
Post edited at 16:16

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