Jacopo Larcher climbs contender for world's hardest trad route

Jacopo Larcher has climbed a contender for the hardest trad route in the world in Cadarese, Italy. Larcher first brushed the line six years ago on his first trip to Cadarese, when he first got into trad climbing. He believes the route is harder than anything he has done and whilst he declined to grade the climb, it's likely the difficulty would be somewhere in the F9a-9a+ region. He has named the route Tribe.

"Tribe" (E none) ~ I'm thinking since two days what I should write about this journey. After so much effort, I was sure to have too many words to describe it, but the reality is that I can't find any. I'm simply happy, very happy. I'm thankful for what I've learned from it, for the the support of my friends, Babsi and the community… and yes, I'm thankful to myself, because I believed in this dream and I didn't give up, even if it would have been easier. ~ I brushed this line 6 years ago, on my first trip to Cadarese, when I got into trad climbing. At the beginning it felt completely impossible, but I was obsessed by the beauty of the line and I kept on trying it hoping to find a solution to climb it. It had witnessed my evolution as a trad climber, as well as a lot of up and downs in my life. I kept on trying it, often alone, even if I'd never done the last two moves until a couple of weeks ago; I believed it was possible and at the end the perseverance paid off. It taught me that we always have to believe in our dreams, no matter what, even if someone tells you're crazy and if it's not always easy. ~ Now the big question is the grade. Everybody is asking me about it and it seems to be the most important thing about the climb, but for me it is not. I've never invested so much time in a route before and I believe it's the hardest I've done so far, but I don't want to reduce it to a number. It wouldn't make any sense to me. It seems like nowadays grades are the most important things in climbing and everything else gets forgotten...but at the end of the day, what we will remember is the experience, not a number. ~ 🙏🏻 to my "Tribe" for sharing with me this process and to the climbing community for all the messages and support. It wouldn't have been the same without you! ~ Peter, this one is for you 🙏🏻 ~ @thenorthface @lasportivagram @blackdiamond @frictionlabs @katadyn_group ~ 📸 @paolosartophoto

A post shared by Jacopo Larcher (@jacopolarcher) on

Larcher wrote on his Instagram: 'At the beginning, it felt completely impossible, but I was obsessed by the beauty of the line and I kept on trying it hoping to find a solution to climb it. It had witnessed my evolution as a trad climber, as well as a lot of up and downs in my life. I kept on trying it, often alone, even if I'd never done the last two moves until a couple of weeks ago; I believed it was possible and at the end, the perseverance paid off. It taught me that we always have to believe in our dreams, no matter what, even if someone tells you're crazy and if it's not always easy.'

The climb doesn't yet have a grade and is roughly 25m high starting with an easier 7a+ section which is relatively unprotected. From here there are two crux sections: one through a roof and the second through a bulge. The route finishes up a crack. The route features horizontal seams which are just big enough to take gear, hence why Larcher decided not to bolt the route.

'Now the big question is the grade. Everybody is asking me about it and it seems to be the most important thing about the climb, but for me it is not. I've never invested so much time in a route before and I believe it's the hardest I've done so far, but I don't want to reduce it to a number. It wouldn't make any sense to me. It seems like nowadays grades are the most important things in climbing and everything else gets forgotten...but at the end of the day, what we will remember is the experience, not a number.'

Larcher already has some of the hardest trad routes on his CV with ascents of Dave MacLeod's Rhapsody, Lapoterapia (8c) in Osso, Psychogramm (8b+) at the Bürser Platte, as well as free climbing many hard big walls. He has sport climbed up to 9a+, bouldered up to F8B+ and climbed ice up to WI6+.

Here's a short film of Larcher working the route:


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Jacopo was born in Merano, South Tyrol, but grew up in Bolzano. He has Sport climbed up to 9a/+ and 8b+ onsight; Bouldered up to 8B/+; Trad up to E9/E10; multipitch up to 8b+ redpoint and 8a+ onsight on...

Jacopo's Athlete Page 6 posts 1 video



He's building up a very impressive list of ascents. Bravo!