UKC

/ Climbing on Prosthetic Limbs

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The Ice Doctor - on 16 May 2018

I get feeds on my android mobile on various stories. Yesterday I got a link about the elderly Chinese guy, Xia who climbed Everest on his Fifth attempt, yes fifth, having failed so many times. He was 69 on his final attempt which is even more remarkable in my eyes.

I also wondered how he funded his attempts, no mention of that in the article, as the cost really is beyond most ordinary folk despite what the high altitude guides preach in their marketing to get their clients.

Have you met anyone who has climbed 'high' on prosthetic limbs? ( because to me I can't imagine the physical pain this guy possibly went through to achieve his dream, whether getting to the top eventually gave him the satisfaction he was yearning for I am quite unsure)

Have you personally met anyone on prosthetic who has climbed mountains and what have they shared with your about their personal journey in the mountains?

GravitySucks - on 16 May 2018
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

I presume that you are familiar with Hugh Herr ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Herr

Not sure what his high altitude experience is.

 

GarethSL on 16 May 2018
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

Not directly related but this old gem is still worth a plug.

The gimp monkeys.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGV2ADbKpcQ

The Ice Doctor - on 17 May 2018
In reply to GravitySucks:

No. I do now though. The article is interesting, but it does not address the physical pain he must surely be in. Similar to Kenton Cool in one way who shattered both his feet but continues to climb. He must be in immense pain, so overcoming this must mean he disassociates himself from the mental pain he puts himself through. Nevertheless, does this not take away the enjoyment of the activity?

Raymondo - on 17 May 2018
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

> I also wondered how he funded his attempts, no mention of that in the article, as the cost really is beyond most ordinary folk despite what the high altitude guides preach in their marketing to get their clients.

There is an 18 year old girl up the road (ok, 100 km up the road), that climbed Everest on her third attempt (after avalanches/earthquakes stopped her), I believe her father has re-mortgaged his house.

 

Maybe the Chinese guy owns a factory, LOL.

Raymondo - on 17 May 2018

Link to said article, wow worth a read. Gave up his sleeping bag, OMG !!!

 

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2146161/chinese-climber-69-crippled-everest-finally-scales-peak

 

 

 

Big Lee - on 17 May 2018
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

> The article is interesting, but it does not address the physical pain he must surely be in.

Using a prosthesis shouldn't be painful, assuming all is well with the residual limb generally. The main problem at high altitude, or on a long endurance trip, is that any change in residential limb volume or shape is going to effect the socket fit, which could lead to local increased pressures if not managed properly. I forget the figures but a single below knee amputee only typically loses about 10% energy efficiency, so not that much. It's obviously more if above knee or bilateral. You can probably Google the figures if interested. I'm a Prosthetist / orthotist btw, although haven't practiced prosthetics for about nine years.

Mark Kemball - on 17 May 2018
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

I meet Norman Croucher back in the 80s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Croucher . Great bloke, he reckoned that he did better at altitude because he didn't need to send blood to his toes! He didn't suffer so much with the cold, and that the higher he got, the better he climbed relative to his companions.

mag_to_grid - on 17 May 2018
Damo on 17 May 2018
In reply to Big Lee:

This is worth a listen: https://enormocast.com/episode-148-hugh-herr-never-broken/

as he talks about making prosthetics for others, and how he could climb better after he lost his legs.


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