UKC

/ Paid up party members

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Baron Weasel - on 10 Jul 2018

Mrs Weasel and I are both paid up members of the labour party and proud to be so. 

Anyone else paid up member of a political party and if so which one?

Have we got any of the elusive paid up tories among us? 

20
Ex Poster 666 - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

> Mrs Weasel and I are both paid up members of the Labour party and proud to be so. 

Me too.
I'd be Momentum as well, but I'm not paying two lots of subscriptions, seeing as I'm only on Carer's Allowance.

13
GridNorth - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

Probably none that will admit to it as they would be pounced on as rabid, uncaring, right wing, bigoted, racist, fascists. 

Al

3
MrsBuggins - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

> Probably none that will admit to it as they would be pounced on as rabid, uncaring, right wing, bigoted, racist, fascists. 

> Al


such is the bigotry of this forum

9
Stuart en Écosse - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

Joined the SNP upon the signing of Article 50. I've never once voted for them, probably never will as I think little of them; and blind loyalty to any political party (or pretty much anything) is anaethema to me. I'll resign if/when Scotland is independent, Brexit goes down the pan where it belongs or if the party does anything that I can't stomach (Wee Nicky holding Trump's hand would be an example).

Normally I'm a Labour/Lib Dem person.

3
Lord_ash2000 - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

> Have we got any of the elusive paid up tories among us? 

I used to be one for a couple of years back in my early 20's when I had a much greater interest in politics. These days I'm happy to sit back and obverse from the back and show my support or disapproval with my vote. 

 

1
stevieb - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

> Have we got any of the elusive paid up tories among us? 

The general level of discussion on these boards is pretty good. I hope that some of our resident (thinking) right wingers are party members.

I've never been a member of any political party; I've also not consistently voted for the same party, but in many ways that makes me part of the problem.

We are now in a situation where, due in large part to first past the post, nearly 90% of English voters voted for either Labour or Conservative. But both party memberships are far more extreme than their average voters? It is by letting our biggest parties be dominated by extremists that we have got to the current situation.

In fact, you've made me think I need to join a party, I just haven't got a bloody clue which one.

 

balmybaldwin - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

I was a paid up member of the Tories - not because they do anything for me (or anyone else) but because I wanted to a) vote on the last Conservative leadership election and b) see what level of political drivel they put out to their members.

a) was unsuccessful as they changed their rules and insisted on 3 months membership prior to election

b) its as badly written and misinformed as the rest of the parties

It only cost me a tenner though and I got to speak at a local meeting about the damage they are doing in my area (promoting flytipping through enforcing residential waste disposal fees (Against tory official gvmt advice), general mismanagement of budgets and pointless grandstanding and misinformation).

 

I'm now a paid up member of the Liberals (where my political heart has always been even if I don't always vote for them)

2
Clarence on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

I was a member of the Federation of Conservative Students until its demise and then a local volunteer for the Conservative Party. I quit when the local grandee told me in not so many words that "my sort" are only for doing the spadework for "real" members, an opinion which seemed to pervade the party at a local level. After doing a lot of thinking and growing-up I joined the Green Party about fifteen years ago and have been a member ever since.

2
Andrew Kin - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

That's downright bullying.  I don't support ANY party as I find all politics boils down to popularity contests and lies.  Thanks for hammering that feeling home with your post.  Do you want to be in my gang?

Post edited at 16:25
15
BFG on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

Lapsed member. Theoretically I'd vote for any party; that hasn't played out in reality as a couple of parties promote very little for me to vote for.

The main thing I'd vote for is any party that promised to deliver electoral reform as I suspect that our current FPTP system is half the reason for the current poor state of our political parties.

GridNorth - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to MrsBuggins:

It is also one of the most dangerous and destructive contributors to social cohesion and free speech in modern society. By shutting down debate by means of abusive and offensive name calling.  Those who do it do us all a great deal of harm and display their ignorance.

Al

2
The New NickB - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Andrew Kin:

> That's downright bullying.

What bullying exactly?

I was a member of the Labour Party for a few years, it was watching Michael Howard at a Tory Party Conference on the telly in the mid-90s that made me join. Probably left in about 98.

I’m in a politically restricted job now, but I don’t think I would like to join any of the parties anyway.

GridNorth - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

I might also add that these attitudes seem to be more prevalent amongst those who identify as being of the Left.

Al

16
Ramblin dave - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

> I might also add that these attitudes seem to be more prevalent amongst those who identify as being of the Left.

You mean among remoaner SJW libtard snowflakes?

Tom V - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

No but I swore that I would vote for the Tories in every election when I joined my local Conservative Club for the purposes of enjoying Sam's Old Brewery bitter at the cheapest price in the village.

They took Sam's out before the subsequent General Election, though, so I haven't felt inclined to honour my promise yet.

GridNorth - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Ramblin dave:

I'm not going to bite.  Sorry

Al

johncoxmysteriously - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

There goes a man, I hazard, who has never admitted to being a supporter of Jeremy Corbyn at the St John’s Wood Bridge Club.

 

jcm

krikoman - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

> There goes a man, I hazard, who has never admitted to being a supporter of Jeremy Corbyn at the St John’s Wood Bridge Club.

What's St.John doing with wood?

 

 

FactorXXX - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to krikoman:

> What's St.John doing with wood?

He's just seen Shepherd's Bush...

pasbury on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

They just hit the dislike button instead. Check the OP

1
pasbury on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

> I might also add that these attitudes seem to be more prevalent amongst those who identify as being of the Left.

> Al


You mean those who aren't currently making a f*cking mess of everything they touch?

2
pasbury on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to MrsBuggins:

> such is the bigotry of this forum


Know thyself.

Wiley Coyote2 - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

I did consider joining both Cons and Labour recently. It seemed the best way of getting a say in who is PM. At the moment  I get one vote in 57,000 cast in the last General Election for my local MP and no say at all in the election of the other 649, which is pretty feeble. But the Tory party membership is now so low (about 120k I would get a say in who leads party and therefore may be PM. Labour has around 520k so not quite such a big say but sine my area is 'Vote vfor a donkey in a blue ribbon' territory I'd at least have some input into  who a Labour PM would be.

But then...I thought 'Who cares? They are all rubbish'.

timjones - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to pasbury:

You're overlooking the fact that a percenatge of the dislikes will be from people who dislike all party political willy waving ;)

1
pasbury on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> Mrs Weasel and I are both paid up members of the labour party and proud to be so. 

Is that political willy waving???

timjones - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to pasbury:

That's the one ;)

Is there any point in flashing it around, does it feel good or superior or something?

2
pasbury on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

??

I don't see any willy. What is wrong with taking a position?

Stuart en Écosse - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to pasbury:

> Is that political willy waving???

I typed my earlier post with my willy out, if that counts.

timjones - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to pasbury:

What is the point of proudly flaunting your political allegiances on a climbing forum?

Don't you think "so fecking what" every time someone plasters I'm voting xxxx over their social media feeds?

3
pasbury on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

We’re off belay. I don’t mind anyone stating their intentions on any forum at all, if they add a ‘because’ that’s helpful because then they can be engaged with.

I don’t understand what you would prefer?

pasbury on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Stuart en Écosse:

And I’ve got three layers of gaffer tape over my webcam.

Ridge - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to stevieb:

> I've never been a member of any political party; I've also not consistently voted for the same party, but in many ways that makes me part of the problem.

> We are now in a situation where, due in large part to first past the post, nearly 90% of English voters voted for either Labour or Conservative. But both party memberships are far more extreme than their average voters? It is by letting our biggest parties be dominated by extremists that we have got to the current situation.

You've described my thoughts on politics in the UK in a nutshell.

 

Mooncat - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

I was a member of the Labour Party for many years, then Ed Milliband became leader. My job means that I have to be politically neutral now. 

Stuart en Écosse - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> What is the point of proudly flaunting your political allegiances on a climbing forum?

Did you read the OP?

 

timjones - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Stuart en Écosse:

Yes, did you ;)

Babika - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to The New NickB

> I’m in a politically restricted job now, but I don’t think I would like to join any of the parties anyway.

 

I was in politically restricted posts for around 20 years but it didn't stop me being a paid up party member. 

The legal restrictions are usually around activity rather than membership per se, so I had a great excuse for turning down all the requests for telephone campaigning!

 

The New NickB - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to Babika:

> In reply to The New NickB

> I was in politically restricted posts for around 20 years but it didn't stop me being a paid up party member. 

> The legal restrictions are usually around activity rather than membership per se, so I had a great excuse for turning down all the requests for telephone campaigning!

I know, but I work in the town that I live, work being with those local politicians. I already have to fall out with some of them ocassionally; being a party member or the member of an opposing party would be a nightmare. I also tend to think if you join something you should get involved, which wouldn't be allowed.

Post edited at 23:29
cander - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

As I departed home for university I recall my fathers sage advice, “what ever you do do not join the socialist workers party” you’ll regret it for the rest of your life (I think he was alluding to the fact I’d never pass a positive vetting if I did). Fortunately I took one look at the stinky, unwashed, unshaven gobshites (and that was just the girls) and decided I sooner have sex with pretty girls (I was still a teenager you see) - easy decision never joined.

1
Stuart en Écosse - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to cander:

Oddly a friend of mine was given sage advice by his father when laving for university. His father sat him own, set up his pipe, took a few puffs then said, "Son. Never trust a man who doesn't drink, or anyone with a well manicured moustache." Sound advice I'd say.

Actually I'm not sure if my friend was SWP. On one hand he did have a Lenin badge on his jacket and would regularly start fights with skinheads, on the other he never had BO and was interesting to converse with so on balance probably not.

Oceanrower - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Stuart en Écosse:

My father's best advice was "Make sure that you're in bed by midnight. If not, you might as well go home.."

Harry Jarvis - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

> I might also add that these attitudes seem to be more prevalent amongst those who identify as being of the Left.

Before you bask in the glow of the righteousness of the Right, you might like to reflect on the increased threats posed by right-wing terrorists, as explained earlier this year by Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley. 

It seems to me, from many years of observing British politics, that the nature of discourse has been utterly debased. To pretend that Left or Right is 'better' in this regard seems to be either a futile hope or wilful ignorance. 

krikoman - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to cander:

> . Fortunately I took one look at the stinky, unwashed, unshaven gobshites (and that was just the girls) and decided .......

 

.....I'd rather be a biggot

 

krikoman - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

I was a member of Labour in the late 70's and was also a trade union member, then drifted out, disillusioned, joined again to support JC and the new direction of Labour.

tom_in_edinburgh - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

> Have we got any of the elusive paid up tories among us? 

Real Tories don't 'pay up' they make a loan they don't expect to be repaid from a letterbox company owned by a trust in Panama.

 

2
skog on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

I've been an SNP member for a while now, and have helped with some door knocking, leaflet delivering, polling-station manning and count observing, although I haven't found time since after the EU referendum.

I'll leave if they move far away from their current form of pro-EU centre-left social liberals trying to encourage Scotland to be better, but I can't see a party more worthy of support just now. The Greens and the Lib Dems aren't bad lots, but the former are too hard-left for me and still seem somewhere between a party and a protest movement (but are maturing fast), and the latter, in Scotland at least, appear to be interested in little more than opposing independence, for now, and seem ready to support the Tories in many places just to hold the SNP back.

The activists and politicians I know are almost all sincere, good people who care about a wide variety of issues; zoomers are very much in the minority. I suspect this is true of most parties' activists (who can be quite a different group from members, or supporters).

Post edited at 10:47
L Climbcycle - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Baron Weasel:

> Mrs Weasel and I are both paid up members of the labour party and proud to be so. 

I don't understand economics either.

GridNorth - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Harry Jarvis:

I'm not basking in anything.  I have many views that could be consider right wing and just as many that would be considered left wing.  I was merely making an observation based on my observations and experience.

Al

GridNorth - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

"an observation based on my observations" ??? Apologies for the crap use of English.

Al 

Harry Jarvis - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

> I'm not basking in anything.  I have many views that could be consider right wing and just as many that would be considered left wing. 

Marvellous, an admirable sense of balance. Splendid fellow. 

> I was merely making an observation based on my observations and experience.

However, as someone obviously endowed with good sense, you would acknowledge that personal experience and observation may not give an accurate representation of the whole picture, and that, for example, Diane Abbott's experiences and observations might well be considerably different to yours. Of course, some of her experiences of abuse arise as a result of her gender, colour, and general incompetence, so such things might need to be taken into consideration in making comparisons, but I would still maintain that members of the Right are just as capable of hurling gratuitous insults as members of the Left. I doubt you could consider that a particularly contentious notion?

 

 

jkarran - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> What is the point of proudly flaunting your political allegiances on a climbing forum?

Dunno, you tell us, you regularly enough discuss your support and admiration for your Conservative (IIRC) MP.

I paid my £3 to have a say in the Labour leadership race before last but that's the extent of it. I also occasionally deliver leaflets for the LibDem's, actually for my signs up for everything then is too busy partner who's supposed to do it for the LibDem's.

If I was to join a party and I might it'dd be Greens or LibDem's for electoral reform, Europe and environment.

jk

Post edited at 12:26
timjones - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to jkarran:

A good MP is a good MP, smarmy party allegiances are just bollocks ;)

Don't get distracted by the colour of the rosettes.

skog on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> A good MP is a good MP

There's a lot of truth in that...

> smarmy party allegiances are just bollocks ;)

> Don't get distracted by the colour of the rosettes

... but the problem with this is that the whip is a thing, and that MPs will tend to support their party's position on many things anyway, so it really is about the party -as well as- the person.

krikoman - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> A good MP is a good MP, smarmy party allegiances are just bollocks ;)

> Don't get distracted by the colour of the rosettes.

And yet one colour would be all for privatising everything, and letting the market decide, while the other would be putting in measures to protect the vulnerable.

I agree with you sentiments, but they don't work well.

Our local Troy MP is trying to keep our hospital open, her party is trying to close it!!

Post edited at 13:09
jkarran - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> A good MP is a good MP, smarmy party allegiances are just bollocks ;)

Yes and no. An MP isn't just a representative for their constituents, the policies they vote through or oppose as a party member do change people's lives. You might well live a life largely insulated from that by dint of being neither very rich nor very poor but to pretend it doesn't matter which party you support on that basis is either dishonest or negligent

> Don't get distracted by the colour of the rosettes.

The colour of the rosette tends to be a pretty good proxy for the focus of their policies.

jk

GridNorth - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Harry Jarvis:

You may be right.  One day I may do a count, still not scientific I know but I definitely get the "sense" that on this forum that most of the personal abuse is from the left. I can't even think of the adjectives that might be used by the right.  Without a doubt those used by the left come to mind more easily.  Racist, bigot, fascist and these are really nasty ways to describe anyone.

Al

Post edited at 13:47
Harry Jarvis - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to GridNorth:

> You may be right.  One day I may do a count, still not scientific I know but I definitely get the "sense" that on this forum that most of the personal abuse is from the left.

But of course, I'm sure you would agree that to limit oneself to these forums, such as they are, would be a woefully inadequate measure of the real scale of the levels of abuse meted out along the political spectrum. 

timjones - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to jkarran:

Is it compulsory to support a party, even when your vote isn't going to make a difference and all you can do is support a good constituency MP.

Too many people see the parties as a lazy way of labelling others and pushing childish insults at those who don't share their own often very narrow views.

 

jkarran - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> Is it compulsory to support a party, even when your vote isn't going to make a difference and all you can do is support a good constituency MP.

You can of course do as you please when it comes to making your vote, I can't compel you to do anything.

> Too many people see the parties as a lazy way of labelling others and pushing childish insults at those who don't share their own often very narrow views.

So what, that's their problem.

jk

timjones - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to jkarran:

> You can of course do as you please when it comes to making your vote, I can't compel you to do anything.

And you'll have an especially hard job trying to make me do something as a vainglorious gesture that will make absolutely no difference to anything ;)

> So what, that's their problem.

It isn't just their problem when the continual background name calling and low level abuse suppresses open debate.

Whether intentional or not the tone of the OP on this thread is not helpful to anyone.

 

jkarran - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

I've no problem at all with the OP's tone. If anything on this particular thread it's you and your 'tone' closing down discussion.

jk

cander - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to krikoman:

Guess who was in the SWP hahahaha 

The New NickB - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to cander:

> Guess who was in the SWP hahahaha 

Probably not, in my experience all the SWP mob turned in to Peter Hitchens, as of course did Peter Hitchens.

cander - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to The New NickB:

He’s a bit of a knob, mind you so was his brother.

Duncan Bourne - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> even when your vote isn't going to make a difference and all you can do is support a good constituency MP.

I have to comment on this as it is a common misconception that a vote makes no difference if your chosen party doesn't win.

First of all there are two sides to voting a) the actual voting and b) lobbying for specific change

In the first instance a) if you vote for party A and they win then hurrah your vote counted, if party B gets in though the amount of influence they can weald depends very much on the size of their majority. Plus the policies of the opposition play an influence on the policies of the winning party. The Tories long run in the 80’s heavily influenced the policies of New Labour resulting in a more right-wing labour than previously.

Secondly b) politicians follow their own beliefs and agendas but are also influenced by the wishes of their constituents. It doesn’t always follow but for the most part if people shout loud enough then it influences what gets put into policy.

A few provisos. Radical change is harder to come by. Change is very slow and it can be both good and bad. It is harder to foster support for more extreme ideas, like a universal wage or hanging, and there is always the media to contend with which plays a huge part in our perception of things.

Voting may not always make the difference you want but it does make a difference

krikoman - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to cander:

> Guess who was in the SWP hahahaha 


I give in, was it you?

They're a bit too far left for me.

cander - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to krikoman:

Sorry must have been your girlfriend.

timjones - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to jkarran:

> I've no problem at all with the OP's tone. If anything on this particular thread it's you and your 'tone' closing down discussion.

> jk

Blimey and I thought that I was taking part in a discussion that had evolved to include the low key bullying and name calling that is all too prevalent in political discussions in this neck of the woods

 

1
timjones - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to Duncan Bourne:

If you are correct why the hell can't the other parties be bothered to field a vaguely credible candidate in our constituency, at the last election the Labour candidate was a geriatric lame duck and the Lib Dem was so invisible that I couldn't even tell what gender they were.

Timmd on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

> Blimey and I thought that I was taking part in a discussion that had evolved to include the low key bullying and name calling that is all too prevalent in political discussions in this neck of the woods

It strikes me that you've come onto a thread asking about people being party members, and talked about it being willy waving to talk online about people voting for whichever political party.

Post edited at 20:35
Duncan Bourne - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

May be they think they can get away with it? May be you should get involved and raise the profile?

Essentially most people will try and do the minimum they can get away with for an easy life. If a ward is considered a "safe" seat for one party then the other parties will not expend the energy defending it compared to a marginal seat. My ward always used to be a "safe" seat until it wasn't. Now every election they fly in the big hitters.

 

Post edited at 20:44
cander - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to timjones:

Why field a good candidate in a losing constituency- it’s just obvious - I live in the Penrith and the borders - why would labour field a serious candidate, they can field a young candidate who needs experience of fighting an election - but there’s no way on earth he’s going to win, and no one cares who the liberal or UKIP candidate is (and I do lump them together as being feckless and irrelevant).


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