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Using public transport to exercise

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 jamesg85 06 Jan 2021

Hi,

I'm wondering if I'm allowed to catch the bus or train to travel 7 miles to meet one friend to exercise (skateboarding)? 

I realise that being allowed and whether it's a good idea are two different things and that as my parents are in their 70s then caution might be the best policy.

Thanks

8
 WaterMonkey 06 Jan 2021
In reply to jamesg85:

You answered your own question.

1
 jamesg85 06 Jan 2021
In reply to WaterMonkey:

Yes, I was going to add that at the end. Indeed, I answered my own question! I think the only way to do this is buy lights for my bike and cycle. 

I think just writing it down, helped me to reason it out in my head.

Post edited at 19:35
 Billhook 06 Jan 2021
In reply to jamesg85:

Sensible decision - especially as the current rules state you should ..."Stay local, which means your own village, town or part of a city"

3
 jamesg85 06 Jan 2021
In reply to Billhook:

Thank you, that has clarified things. Therefore, I won't cycle to another town/city to meet a friend. 

 daftdazza 06 Jan 2021
In reply to jamesg85:

I personally think it's fair game if you dont drive, but given situation with parents probably wouldn't be wise.  But alot of trains are also empty and it's not hard to get a carriage to yourself and open windows, I would be less likely to use a bus.  I personally have been using the train for access for exercise throughout the pandemic and see no problem with it, I choose not to drive for environmental reasons and shouldn't now be confined to a city due to not driving when I am legally entitled to travel up to 5 miles from my council border.

Cycling obviously a better more fun option, but difficult where I live due to lack of roads or cycle paths being gritted.

9
In reply to daftdazza:

> Cycling obviously a better more fun option, but difficult where I live due to lack of roads or cycle paths being gritted.

Count yourself lucky, the gritter gritted me on bike commute home last night. An unpleasant sensation like falling through a cold, wet sand dune.

In reply to jamesg85:

> I realise that being allowed and whether it's a good idea are two different things and that as my parents are in their 70s then caution might be the best policy.

At the moment if you live with people in their 70s it would be wise to be VERY cautious, almost as far as borderline shielding, let alone taking the train (high risk) to see your mate.

In a blunt sense, as that is how it is, you wouldn't want to bring it home and infect them as it could cause serious harm.  So you really need to act as if you were 70 as well.

Post edited at 20:16
In reply to daftdazza:

You in Scotland, I guess?  In England we are being asked to stay within our village, town or part of city whether we drive or not.

Post edited at 20:16
2
 jamesg85 06 Jan 2021
In reply to Neil Williams:

No, I'm in England. I did read the guidelines but must have missed that. Someone pointed it out above and I won't be leaving my town. I really should have read the guidelines again in more detail but some kind people on here have made me more aware. Thanks

Post edited at 20:20
 jamesg85 06 Jan 2021
In reply to jamesg85:

Also, I'm also thinking of buying a home test kit. I don't have symptoms but I just want to be extra cautious considering the age of my parents.

1
 daftdazza 06 Jan 2021
In reply to bouldery bits:

I can imagine, pretty horrible, I only gave up my cycle commute due to both bikes failing, snow build up burnt out one hydraulic brake, and grit seemingly destroyed gear gable on other bike.  Would be great to be able to walk home from work instead but due to pavements being lethal train has been safer option.

But only mentioned the freedom to travel by public transport if circumstances dictate as it's a reality for many people, many people don't drive due to lack of money as evident by low car use rates in poorest parts of Glasgow, for years people in such areas have suffered from high air pollution locally without car use being a option for themselves, combined with fact people choose to live in places like Glasgow due to abundance of affordable housing compared to rural areas, so no one in such circumstances anywhere in UK should be shamed for wanting to legally use public transport for excerise or access to nature, no matter the current situation with the virus.

In reply to daftdazza:

> no one in such circumstances anywhere in UK should be shamed for wanting to legally use public transport for excerise or access to nature

"Access to nature" is not an exception in England at present.

It can be used for exercise if necessary.  It's different from last time, when the restriction on using public transport was stricter than a car.  However, as he has said, someone who is living with people in their 70s doesn't need to be bothering themselves too much about the law, they need to be making absolutely sure there is no way they can take the virus back home, which will basically involve very near to shielding.  So using public transport if they can avoid making the journey at all is the right thing to do in that specific case.

Post edited at 21:04
In reply to daftdazza:

> I can imagine, pretty horrible, I only gave up my cycle commute due to both bikes failing, snow build up burnt out one hydraulic brake, and grit seemingly destroyed gear gable on other bike.  Would be great to be able to walk home from work instead but due to pavements being lethal train has been safer option.

Mate, I'm sorry to hear that. Hope you can get one of them rolling again soon. Bike repair is not my strong suit but thankfully my brother lives for mechanical tinkering. I've been lucky to be able to cycle recently and, being down south, the weather hasn't been too harsh of late. Refreshing but not dangerous. Totally get why you'd choose the train. Fact is, many people have to go places. I have to go to work or parents of young children who are key workers cants go to work. 

My journey to work takes me through the local station (and crosses the line there) but the train doesn't stop anywhere near work! 

> But only mentioned the freedom to travel by public transport if circumstances dictate as it's a reality for many people, many people don't drive due to lack of money as evident by low car use rates in poorest parts of Glasgow, for years people in such areas have suffered from high air pollution locally without car use being a option for themselves, combined with fact people choose to live in places like Glasgow due to abundance of affordable housing compared to rural areas, so no one in such circumstances anywhere in UK should be shamed for wanting to legally use public transport for excerise or access to nature, no matter the current situation with the virus.

Oh! I really wasn't making a counter point. More being a bit silly and telling a silly tale! I was still finding sand in my shoes this morning. 

Stay safe,

BB

 daftdazza 07 Jan 2021
In reply to bouldery bits:

Haha it's cool, funny story, I will probably either walk to work this week it's only an hour and take train home or vice versa, and hopefully get bike fixed for next week.  My rant was not at yourself more at people who look down at someone for using public transport, having sympathy for the OP in his situation.

The situation up here in Glasgow with icy pavements is a disgrace, had to rescue a electric wheel chair user today who was sliding backwards down hill on a main cycle route into the city that has not be gritted once 11 days into a cold spell., Shocking.


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