UKC

/ Climbing Norway - Best month to go?

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ClimbyPerson - on 20 Mar 2018

Hi all,

In the process of planning a climbing trip to Norway, however, not sure which month to go for to get the best chance of decent weather. 

Would anyone be able to advise on the above? Ideally I would go later in the year as gives me time to plan.

Thanks!

Mark Kemball - on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

I suspect it's a matter of luck, but we got lucky with good weather in Lofoten in June 2016.

Gordon Stainforth - on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

June almost certainly best bet for the best chance. But it is very chancy, year by year, a bit like Scotland. You can have long dry spells or weeks of murky/damp/very wet.

ThunderBeest - on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

From Kristiansand to Tromsø is about 2000 km, as you could imagine, the climbing season isn't quite the same.

August and start of September are often really nice. (last year the end of September was stunning in Tromsø) Also if you are in the North, most of the snow will be gone, while in June there will most likely be quite some left.

d_b on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

I have done well with August in the past.  Unlike some of the others I was unlucky when I tried June - late snow meant lots of mountain crags still had melt water running down them.

wbo - on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

Agree with the above - where it's a big place.  I've climbed outdoors in nice weather in Jan , had snow to sea level in June.  Location matters 

jim jones on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

I climbed in Lofoten in June and the weather was mixed at best. Only managed to climb on six days out of 14 possible. The classic route Vestpillaren Direct has more ascents July and August than June on UKC. I'd definitely go in Aug' next time. 

HeMa on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

Depends on year and location. Norway is a big country. 

TobyA on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

It's a very long country. I've done maybe 6 trips, each of a week or so, to the far north (Lofoten, Tysfjorden, Kvaløya) and always had good to decent weather in late July or August. If you go to the Arctic much earlier than July you can expect lots of snow around still in the mountains. My mates went to Lofoten in June and said it was freezing! And I've been ski touring in Lyngen in May and we were still skiing to virtually sea level.

Robert Durran - on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to TobyA:

> My mates went to Lofoten in June and said it was freezing! And I've been ski touring in Lyngen in May and we were still skiing to virtually sea level.

I went to Lofoten in the first half of April to winter climb. It was good for a few days but then warmed up dramatically and people were happily cragging in the sun on south facing crags!

 

TobyA on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to Robert Durran:

Did you pick April for a reason? My impression is that sea level in Lofoten can warm up much much earlier than areas no higher but further east. I guess it is sticking out so far into the ocean. I saw on social media that Jon Bracey was climbing there in the last few weeks and it looked great, but I've heard other people not finding good winter climbing conditions in April - although they ski toured as an alternative.

Robert Durran - on 21 Mar 2018
In reply to TobyA:

> Did you pick April for a reason?

Yes. I'm a teacher, so I couldn't go earlier!

> My impression is that sea level in Lofoten can warm up much much earlier than areas no higher but further east.

I think that's true. We bailed out to the mainland (Stetind area) where it was much snowier but poor conditions.

 

Post edited at 23:23
summo on 22 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

I wouldn't base your plan on averages, it's a longer winter, with a lot of snow this year and no sign of spring yet. 

Big Lee - on 22 Mar 2018
In reply to ClimbyPerson:

The climbing season is longer in the south but lower lying places get too hot and humid for good granite friction in mid-summer. Vice versa for the north. The mountains obviously lose snow through the year until around mid-autumn, so it depends on whether snow or dry rock is what you're after. There's been loads of snow this winter and persistent cold temperatures. Expect the snow to take a bit longer than normal to shift.

TobyA on 22 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Lee:

Not much snow in the Arctic so very good ice climbing conditions my Tromsø friend reports.

wbo - on 22 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Lee:thats for sure.  I was planning to go Nissedal in May but thats looking quite uncertain.

yr.no is the weather site, with historical data.   as others have illustrated it can very rapidly in a comparatively short distance

 

ThunderBeest - on 23 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

A lot of snow this year? There's been only a metre of snow in the North this year. Half of it came last week, but it all might disappear soon!


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