UKC

/ Summer running

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BusyLizzie on 06 Jul 2018

Is there any reason why running in the heat should generate more aches and pains than usual? Or did I just age ten years yesterday evening?

On a lighter note I think I am far less bothered by nettle stings than I used to be - does one buuld up immunity?

cathsullivan on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

> Is there any reason why running in the heat should generate more aches and pains than usual? Or did I just age ten years yesterday evening?

I think it could, because you are having to work harder to regulate your body temperature.  Also, dehydration might do this, I suspect.

> On a lighter note I think I am far less bothered by nettle stings than I used to be - does one buuld up immunity?

I've noticed that too.  They always seemed horrendous when I was a child and were painful for days.   Now they seem to be a mild irritation that's gone in minutes.  And I really don't think I am any less wimpy than I was as a child.  Maybe a little bit.

yorkshireman - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

> Is there any reason why running in the heat should generate more aches and pains than usual? Or did I just age ten years yesterday evening?

I'm pretty sure as cathsullivan said it's just a harder effort in general and dehydration doesn't help aches and pains.

> On a lighter note I think I am far less bothered by nettle stings than I used to be - does one buuld up immunity?

Maybe. But the biggest learning for me was not to touch nettle stings when they happen as they just get worse. Better to leave them, let them tingle then I assume dry-out and then they're pretty much gone.

 

Rampikino - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Having just got back from my 5 miler at 9am and found it as tough as ever in the heat...

I suspect there is a correlation between temperature and pace due to the exertion required to run.  I also think dehydration is a factor, though not on very short runs.  I would imagine that if you think of your body as an engine with various inputs and outputs, the extra stress placed on the system by added heat reduces the engine efficiency so you have to do more work to maintain a level that you would comfortably reach at cooler temperatures.

I hate summer running!

As for nettles - I hadn't thought of it before, but I think you might be right - they don't seem to bother me as much any more...

mbh - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

On nettles - I don't think so. Maybe I have just been successfully avoiding them and now notice them more, but early this spring I was twice stung by tiny young ones and it hurt for ages. I wondered if they are (always?) more potent when young and become less so as the season goes on?

BusyLizzie on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to mbh:

I think there are nettles and nettles. The ones that live amongst blackberries are always very painful, now i come to think of it.

BusyLizzie on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to all:

Thank you all, that's very comforting about aches and pains. I can cope if there's a reason for it other than personal decrepitude.

timjones - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

I don't think that running in heat produces extra aches and pains, however not  managing your hydration levels well during and after the run probably does.

 

mountainbagger - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

> Is there any reason why running in the heat should generate more aches and pains than usual? Or did I just age ten years yesterday evening?

I feel absolutely shattered at the moment, and the only thing I can think that is different to some weeks ago is the heat. Not sure about aches and pains exactly just worn out all over. The fact I am not sleeping well in the heat might be a factor too.

Also, whilst I didn't have hay fever when I was younger (both my brother and dad have it though), the last few years I've been suspecting it. The pollen count is presumably still quite high at the moment - perhaps that is also contributing to tiredness?

Wanderer100 - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

I don't think the heat effects me too badly but running 10km the other night after eating half a packet of extra strong Cheese and Jalepeno crisps produced some very unwelcome heartburn!! 

Deleted bagger - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to Rampikino:

> Having just got back from my 5 miler at 9am and found it as tough as ever in the heat...

Me too. Just been for a quick out and back up Black Hill from Holme. Not so bad on the top but way too hot below.

Moley on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

I find the heat hard for running, but not aches and pains. Heat management is what restricts us from running further/faster, same as any creature, like a cheetah can only sprint for a short burst and then overheats and has to quit chasing it's dinner. Not saying I'm as quick as a cheetah, but pretty close

Obviously some of us are better or worse at coping with heat, genetics, body shape, fat, acclimatisation, all sorts of factors. Doesn't help that some go shooting off up a hill on a scorching day whilst others wallow in a pool of sweat.

stuartf - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

My regular run has an overgrown footpath between an electric fence and a Blackthorn filled hedgerow. I call it "nettle alley" and in the summer my legs can tingle for hours afterwards and sometimes even come out in a rash. Winter is better as I wear long trousers! On the plus side it had finally been strimmed last night.

wbo - on 06 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:how do your times compare - a lot of people slow down in the dark of winter so it's conparatcompa easier.

 

After that it's down to temperature management - I'm usually ok in the heat but have struggled on years I have 'extra insulation'

 

BusyLizzie on 08 Jul 2018
In reply to wbo:

> how do your times compare - a lot of people slow down in the dark of winter so it's conparatcompa easier.

I am noticeably even slower in the summer than in winter. I did a road half marathon in October in 2 hrs 9 mins, same again in a trail half in early May - I'm not getting anywhere near that in these conditions, except briefly when doing intervals.

TheDrunkenBakers - on 08 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Ive just developed horrendous ITB syndrome in the hip and have got to rest. I was fine before the heat, managed 1.6miles before I had to stop yesterday. Coincidence probably.

I love the heat but not in 21oc plus at 10am when running.

David Riley - on 08 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Hot works for me. I seem virtually immune. The heat has resulted in a totally undeserved county medal and £45 total winnings this week. My aches and pains go away when it's warm.

Wainers44 - on 08 Jul 2018
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Heat makes things much more difficult for me. 

The difference seems to be linked to my heart rate. In the cool and running a good pace I have to try v hard to get it over 130bpm. Same pace on a hot day then 160 is the norm.

As my RHR is only 42 that's a massive extra effort!!! I get more tired much quicker! 


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