/ Jugs

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Calum Elliot - on 08 Nov 2017
My wife asked me a good question yesterday "Why are the big climbing holds called Jugs?" I honestly couldn't think of a good answer why. Any ideas?
Lemony - on 08 Nov 2017
In reply to Calum Elliot:

Because they're like jug handles
mp3ferret on 08 Nov 2017
In reply to Calum Elliot:

Jug handles - like fork handles - but on jugs.
Calum Elliot - on 08 Nov 2017
In reply to Lemony:

That's disappointing, i was hoping for something more interesting.
john arran - on 08 Nov 2017
In reply to mp3ferret:

> Jug handles - like fork handles - but only one of them.

FTFY
dunc56 - on 08 Nov 2017
In reply to Lemony:

Surely it's the jug and not the handle ?
mouseliveson - on 08 Nov 2017
In reply to Calum Elliot:

More importantly - what defines a jug? :P
When does a jug become a sloper, become a crimp, become an edge?
Mark Kemball - on 08 Nov 2017
In reply to dunc56:

> Surely it's the jug and not the handle ?

No, they were originally refered to as "Jug-Handle Holds", See for example verse 6 of "The Ballad of Idwal Slabs" https://monologues.co.uk/Sport/Idwal_Slabs.htm
stp - on 11 Nov 2017
In reply to yh001:

If you're hoping for a definitive answer you won't find one on here that's for sure.

The first issue is: is 'jug' a relative term or an absolute one?

I'd say it's relative. It's relative to hand size, fitness of the climber and to the surrounding terrain. What's considered a jug on an 8a could be a lot smaller than a jug on a severe.
Gordon Stainforth - on 11 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

> I'd say it's relative. It's relative to hand size, fitness of the climber and to the surrounding terrain. What's considered a jug on an 8a could be a lot smaller than a jug on a severe.

... As the sometimes-used expression 'finger jug' demonstrates. A 'jug', though, normally implies a big incut hold that you can get your whole hand over. Rather than a jug handle, I tend to have more of the image of the rim of a beer mug.
Post edited at 15:13
krikoman - on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to Calum Elliot:
It's because the holds are like ears (lugs) as in , Look at the size of Prince Charles' jugs.

















This obviously isn't true, it's ladies breasts and the comfort you get from holding them.
Post edited at 10:19
mouseliveson - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

I don't expect anything definitive on UKC but why should it be anyway?
That's why discussing this silly stuff is fun.

My buddies and I, define it as anything over a finger pads depth and a hold that is positive in relation to the wall...that goes to your point of how big your hands are...
paul mitchell - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yh001:

Why do people say a move is 'static'? Surely ,not moving is static.
JoshOvki on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Calum Elliot:

Because you always feel better holding onto them?
mouseliveson - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

I'm not sure where this tangent came from, but I suppose it's just semantics...though I believe the term comes from 'static exercise' or isometric exercise where no movement in any joint angle (like planks) are made. So - technically wrong!
stp - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yh001:

> My buddies and I, define it as anything over a finger pads depth and a hold that is positive in relation to the wall

Interesting. That makes me think it must be relative to the angle of the wall too. I bet most would not describe a fingerpad sized incut on a roof as a jug. Maybe 'jug' could be defined as something that still feels big even in the middle of roof?
stp - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

> Why do people say a move is 'static'? Surely ,not moving is static.

Isn't it that your body is static whereas in a dynamic move your body moves too because your using momentum to do the move.
john arran - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

It's static because it doesn't rely on speed of movement. If you can, theoretically at least, pause in the middle of a movement, without gravity winning, you'll feel you've done a move statically.
dunc56 - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Mark Kemball:

> No, they were originally refered to as "Jug-Handle Holds", See for example verse 6 of "The Ballad of Idwal Slabs" https://monologues.co.uk/Sport/Idwal_Slabs.htm

That's clearly cack - think of the topography. They aren't equivalent.
Mark Kemball - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to dunc56:

There is no need to be rude. I stand by my original statement. My father, who climbed before I was born in the early 1950s, used the term "jug-handle holds".
mountain.martin - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to dunc56:

> That's clearly cack - think of the topography. They aren't equivalent.

In what way aren't they equivalent?

That has always been my understanding of the term. A hold like a jug handle, a very positive hold big enough to get all, or most of, your fingers in.

As you would with a the old fashion pint beer glasses with handles, also known as jugs.
Ramblin dave - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

> I'd say it's relative. It's relative to hand size, fitness of the climber and to the surrounding terrain. What's considered a jug on an 8a could be a lot smaller than a jug on a severe.

I've got a friend, occasionally of this parish, who uses "gritstone jug" for the sort of square-ish edge that is no sense an actual jug but feels as good as one when you come at it from the right angle on a gritstone slab.
trouserburp - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to yh001:

> When does a jug become a sloper, become a crimp, become an edge?

As they get closer - ledge-bound: "go for it you've got a jug after this bit", mid-crux: "keep going the crimp is good", when disappointed/angry they can't let go to clip and are about to take whipper: "well it's got a bit of an edge on it!"
John Stainforth - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Mark Kemball:

I think it's usually the handle and not the jug, but there is a subset of jug holds that fills up with water just like a jug!

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