UKC

Scattered ashes and tributes at Caley Crag

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It seems that the viewpoint at Caley above Quark, Charm, Strangeness, Scoop has become a memorial spot which has been used on more than one occasion to scatter loved ones ashes.

Having climbed through someone's relative on  an evening trip up the Scoop last night - I would describe the experience as less than ideal....

So check the top before you set off.

 plyometrics 29 Apr 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

> Having climbed through someone's relative on an evening trip up the Scoop last night…

My favourite UKC line of the year so far.  

 Bob Kemp 29 Apr 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

> Having climbed through someone's relative on  an evening trip up the Scoop last night

Not pleasant, especially if it’s a bit windy. But doesn’t it save on chalk?

2
In reply to Bob Kemp:

> Not pleasant, especially if it’s a bit windy. But doesn’t it save on chalk?

If it works like chalk then we have found a good use for dead relatives. Probably environmentally friendlier than chalk too.

1

I once climbed at Ramshaw and thought the  ledges were a bit gritty/dusty... then looked closer and realised it must be someones granny or pet

 gethin_allen 29 Apr 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

See this all the time in this spot and a few others nearby. I once had a good laugh at someone trying to scatter ashes over the edge at Stanage high neb while someone was climbing below. It was blowing a gale and the wind was picking up the ashes and throwing them back in the face of the scatterers.

4
 ChrisJD 29 Apr 2022
In reply to gethin_allen:

> It was blowing a gale and the wind was picking up the ashes and throwing them back in the face of the scatterers.

... Well at least Granny brought tears to their eyes one last time

 timjones 29 Apr 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

> Having climbed through someone's relative on  an evening trip up the Scoop last night - I would describe the experience as less than ideal....

Did the dust make you sneeze or are you just a bit sqeamish?

 Trangia 29 Apr 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

It's vandalism, like the spread of memorials, bunches of flowers etc in wild beautiful country. By all mans remember a loved one in the hills etc, but leave no trace. Dedicated memorial gardens and cemeteries are the place for leaving tributes.

There have been a number of UKC threads on this subject in recent years.

36
 Tom Valentine 29 Apr 2022
In reply to Trangia:

If we're serious about leaving no trace, ashes disappear a lot quicker than bolts.

4
 Trangia 29 Apr 2022
In reply to Tom Valentine:

Good point 

1
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

I think you've just solved the mystery of the strange deposits I climbed through on a route near Goliath's Groove a couple of years ago.

In reply to Robert Durran:

> If it works like chalk then we have found a good use for dead relatives. Probably environmentally friendlier than chalk too.

Come to think of it, I might request that after my death I am put in a friend's chalk bag and used on an ascent of The Prozac Link if I don't get around to doing it during my lifetime.

 mrphilipoldham 29 Apr 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

I had this on (I kid you not!) Coffin Crack (VS 4c). Rather than scattered they were dumped in a pile so I had a good natter to them whilst my second followed up. 

 ianstevens 30 Apr 2022
In reply to Robert Durran:

> If it works like chalk then we have found a good use for dead relatives. Probably environmentally friendlier than chalk too.

Ashes are actually very acidic (hence roses in funeral gardens) and are pretty bad for the soil on a local scale.

1
 Fat Bumbly2 30 Apr 2022
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):

Happened to me at Ilkley.  A very gritty jug at the top of a route. Saw the box when I topped out.

 Becky E 01 May 2022
In reply to Robert Durran:

Ashes are nothing like chalk and, in the case of my grandma, full of bits of metal from her knee replacements. (I picked through her ashes and pulled out all the little nails & staples before we scattered her on the moorside).

 DerwentDiluted 01 May 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

I want my ashes scattered on a beautiful crag top, complete with non biodegradable cello wrapped plastic flowers and preferably a plastic plaque epoxied to the rock bearing the words 

"To the memory of Derwentdiluted,  he loved this place so we thought we'd pollute it"

Post edited at 12:09
1
 Tom Valentine 01 May 2022
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

 I'd like my ashes to sway in the wind for a time before finally coming to rest on the ground so I'm thinking of a nice little black plastic bag to hang off a tree....

 gimmergimmer 01 May 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

This is asking for another list of suitable climbs to be spread uponst- 'cemetary gates'  , 

 HardenClimber 01 May 2022
In reply to ianstevens:

Aren't human ashes quite alkaline....all that calcium etc (as opposed to coal ash). Wood ash is alkaline as well ('potash')

1
In reply to ianstevens:

In my experience,  ashes were slippery, not helpful like chalk.   

 graeme jackson 19 May 2022
In reply to Bob Kemp:

> Not pleasant, especially if it’s a bit windy.

My sister in law ended up blowing through the ice-cream van window at Chanonry point on the black isle (we weren't invited). Apparently not the first time that's happened. 

 deepsoup 19 May 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

To me the word "scattered" has always suggested being spread over quite a wide area.  It sounds like "flytipped" would be a more apt description for the ashes you encountered..

 Babika 19 May 2022
In reply to gethin_allen:

Perfect.

Just like the scene from The Big Lebowski

 ianstevens 19 May 2022
In reply to HardenClimber:

Doh, mixed up. ph 11.8 apparently!

 Bob Kemp 19 May 2022
In reply to graeme jackson:

'Oi, this stracciatella is a bit gritty!'

 mark s 20 May 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

I finished a route at hen cloud into a pile of human dust. 

Someone has drilled a plaque into the rock at ramshaw. I had a massive debate with them over it a while back.it was removed now it's back again.

Last week a ranger was there and I asked if they had seen it,I showed him and he said he would look into it.

Can give the location if someone wants to take a screw driver 

 tlouth7 20 May 2022
In reply to deepsoup:

> To me the word "scattered" has always suggested being spread over quite a wide area.

My grandfather was not so much scattered as plopped at sea - in an urn made of sand that is supposed to disintegrate.

I can certainly see the appeal of lobbing such an urn off a favourite sea cliff, but I would at least shout "below" first.

Post edited at 08:43
 HammondR 22 May 2022

Unexpectedly climbed through the cremulated remains of some dead person at the top of Fearnought at Shipley Glen this afternoon.

First time in a long while at the Glen. It's not pleasant.

In reply to martin Chirstmas:

> Having climbed through someone's relative on  an evening trip up the Scoop last night - I would describe the experience as less than ideal....

You should always ask before climbing through.

 olddirtydoggy 23 May 2022
In reply to martin Chirstmas:

At least it was ashes that landed on you, not the body.


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