/ What do you love about climbing?

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jezb1 - on 13 Sep 2017
*** A nice light hearted, happy thread ***

There's so much isn't there!

I'm always saying this to people but I love climbing for so many reasons.

Somedays it's for those hard redpoint moves, somedays for being scared silly above a manky nut placement, somedays for the views or the adventure, somedays for the company, somedays I love training indoors, somedays I love all the geeky climbing chat, it's all great.

It's awesome that there's so many aspects to it. Some people might only ever do trad, ace, some people may only ever climb indoors, that's ace too!
NigelHurst - on 13 Sep 2017
Sitting at the top having got past that move that has the lizard part of your brain screaming "why the f*ck are you doing this, you could die!" belaying your second up and enjoying the view.
elsewhere on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:
Afterwards you really don't give a stuff about what was bothering or worrying you before.
jezb1 - on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to elsewhere:

> Afterwards you really don't give a stuff about what was bothering or worrying you before.

Those moments are great hey?! Where nothing else matters at all
Goucho on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

The arguments on UKC
Jon Stewart - on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

I like spending my entire life looking at the weather forecast.
jezb1 - on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to Jon Stewart:

> I like spending my entire life looking at the weather forecast.

Don't joke, that's the most stressful thing in my life at the moment with all this crap weather in N Wales!
Ciderslider - on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

Being let down by climbing partners and the weather
olddirtydoggy - on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

Switch off from a high pressure job. The adventure of a multi pitch and the absolute joy of hacking up snow and ice. Feels like you're taking on nature.
Mark Bannan - on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

When I think of my life before I started climbing and compare with the life I have enjoyed since then, climbing has given me happiness, acceptable sanity and a reasonable level of mental and physical health. I know many people make glib-sounding statements about "discovering themselves" in their 20s, but the difference in me between the ages of 22 and 28 was so profound that I could not have foreseen such a change taking place. I am sure other factors contributed, but climbing certainly seemed to act as a kind of catalyst for personal transformation.

M
Jamjar on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

I love everything about climbing, which for me is mainly trad - the walk in, the coffee to recover from the walk in, the faffing while choosing a route, the ritual of gearing up, the puzzle of choosing the right bit of pro, the scariness, the exhilaration, the satisfaction... and then the view. And then at the end of the day, driving home on a real high!
In reply to jezb1:

Slight thread highjack, but we've started our own take on the Humans of New York Facebook page, called Humans of Climbing. It'll be a series of people featured in a photograph alongside a short anecdote that tells something about their lives - with a climbing slant in our case about what it gives you, where it's taken you etc. The stories are often feel-good/inspirational/unique in some way: https://www.facebook.com/humansofnewyork/

First example here: https://www.facebook.com/ukclimbing/posts/10154993239754639

Anyone who fancies putting themselves or someone else forward to be featured, email news@ukclimbing.com Don't be shy!
profitofdoom on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

Moving up a challenging route with great moves, but in control, on a beautiful day then topping out
Vanessa Simmons on 13 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:
It makes life worth living
BnB - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

> Don't joke, that's the most stressful thing in my life at the moment with all this crap weather in N Wales!

Not helpful to a climbing instructor I'm sure but I had two lovely days on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week scrambling up Moels Hebog and Siabod. The weather and light was reminiscent of Skye, the scenery and locations stunning. You live in a beautiful part of the world.
DerwentDiluted - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:
One of the many reasons for me is that it is very egalitarian. A VDiff climber can be just as scared and elated on a Severe as someone at the top end pushing their grade, both can have a full-on experience and walk away their own hero. Elitism exists, but it's imposed by comparison to fellow participants, it is not intrinsic to the climbing itself. Ultimately, for all participants there are simply just things you can, and can't, do, its a shared joy and frustration to all. Also, to compare with football, most football players will never get to play at Wembley, Anfield or old Trafford etc, but as a climber you can rock up at the Cromlech, South Stack or Stanage and play on the hallowed turf. Climbing is a gauntlet thrown down to all, a spectrum where the red can be just as rewarding as the violet, and/or vice versa.
Post edited at 08:50
pasbury on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

> but as a climber you can rock up at the Cromlech, South Stack or Stanage and play on the hallowed turf.

Rocks, boulders and crags are just so beautiful too - I love being under, on and on top of them.
MBano on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:
If I had to reduce it to three words, it would be 'grace under pressure'. When you face something that is scary, or physically demanding, and you do it, not just with brute effort, with a grimace, but with some degree of skill and elegance. The feeling of moving well. That's why I love climbing.
Post edited at 13:39
1poundSOCKS - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

> One of the many reasons for me is that it is very egalitarian.

You've never heard of the pyramid of shit?

http://eveningsends.com/nonessential-dos-donts-climbing/
Mark Kemball - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

> One of the many reasons for me is that it is very egalitarian.

So true - the same pushing yourself experience, or a pleasant climb well within your capabilities (and everything inbetween) is available to everyone.

What do I love about climbing? Almost everything (even, occasionally bouldering). What do I most love? Being in the mountains, pushing my limits on rock, sitting in the sunshine, belaying halfway up a seacliff...
springfall2008 - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

Being able to buy shiny new toys ;)

And partaking in an activity where there are no interruptions and 100% focus on the here and now (mainly for outdoors).
Mark Bannan - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

Great post! Agreed wholeheartedly. I would also add the Chamonix and Zermatt Alps to your list of "hallowed turf" - superb mountaineering experiences are open to comparatively inexperienced or low-grade climbers, so long as general mountain fitness is OK.

> Elitism exists, but it's imposed by comparison to fellow participants, it is not intrinsic to the climbing itself.

Ironically, I've found that the greatest elitism has been displayed by folk who are hilariously low grade to be elitist (not that I like elitism at all) and many very high grade climbers (although not all!) are not elitist at all.

springfall2008 - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to Mark Bannan:

> Ironically, I've found that the greatest elitism has been displayed by folk who are hilariously low grade to be elitist (not that I like elitism at all) and many very high grade climbers (although not all!) are not elitist at all.

Well if you are world class climber you have nothing to prove.

But you can climb E1 you can look down your nose at someone climbing VD so you feel much better! *lol*
Mark Bannan - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to springfall2008:

> Well if you are world class climber you have nothing to prove.

What does that mean when it's at home?

> But you can climb E1 you can look down your nose at someone climbing VD so you feel much better! *lol*

If you had read my post, I think you would find that I said I did not like elitism in climbing. Do you look down your nose at someone climbing VD?

M

springfall2008 - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to Mark Bannan:

> What does that mean when it's at home?

> If you had read my post, I think you would find that I said I did not like elitism in climbing. Do you look down your nose at someone climbing VD?

No, I was agreeing with you, it was a joke!
Robert Durran - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

> One of the many reasons for me is that it is very egalitarian.

I couldn't agree more. This afternoon I was alternating goes on a 45 degree board at the climbing wall with a "sponsored hero" who climbs 8c big walls and tiny kids who could barely pull onto it. Brilliant! It's the same on the crags and in the mountains.
TheFasting on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

I love all the cool things I see and all the adventures I do. Even going to a sport crag and climbing on something I haven't climbed on before is a mini-adventure in itself.

Also the adrenaline of it. Getting the fear of death once a week is a great way to get some perspective.
bouldery bits - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

I just like buying and maintaining equipment.
Ian Patterson on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Robert Durran:

> I couldn't agree more. This afternoon I was alternating goes on a 45 degree board at the climbing wall with a "sponsored hero" who climbs 8c big walls and tiny kids who could barely pull onto it. Brilliant! It's the same on the crags and in the mountains.

Absolutely, my 17 year old daughter has recently got back into climbing (indoors) after becoming disillusioned with hockey and definitely enjoying the really positive atmosphere you get from almost everybody. Having been involved in lots of sports climbing does seem pretty special in this regard.
stp - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

Was chatting to a climber friend and he told me about an interesting statistic. Apparently 40% of middle age (40 - 60s) people get less than 10 minutes exercise per month. It seemed an astonishing statistic to both of us with all our friends as part of the climbing community. So one thing I love about climbing (of many) is that it gives a very strong incentive to stay fit, healthy and look after oneself.
Dave Cundy - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Jon Stewart:

Twenty years ago, when i was addicted to paragliding, we used to watch every forecast, looking for tiny nuances that would change our opinion of where/when to fly. One of the lads admitted that he recorded every forecast. Had several video tapes full of em. So no matter how sad you think climbers are, paraglider pilots are much much worse

In response to the OP, i like climbing much more than lugging a big sack up the hill and then sitting around chatting for hours before getting on with it. Hang in, that's climbing, isn't it. D'oh!
TobyA on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:
I like the small world nature of climbing, do it long enough and you meet friends or friends of friends in the most bizarre places - this has become even more so post internet. I remember sharing a belay on Agag's Groove with a chap and then meeting him at the bottom of Terrier's Tooth a year or so later. I heard a team speaking Finnish at Froggat, went to speak to them in my best bad Finnish, was chatting with the woman belaying at the top when from down below her second said "is that Toby?!" I had sold a jacket to him a few years ago when I was still living in Finland. We were in the Climbers Cafe in Henningsvaer, Lofoten. Two climbers were looking at my partner, one came over to him and said: "is your wife japanese?" my partner says "ummm... yes..." Other climber: "you guys camped next to us at Arapiles a few years ago!" Last summer I was at Reiff, got chatting to the guys who pulled up in the car next to us. They were laughing at the pair of skis in our car - long story I say, my partner had brought them from Finland for me, where I used to live. Immediate reply: "oh you must be Toby, I'm friends with Neil" [an old uni mate of mine]. And so on.
Post edited at 22:07
The Ivanator - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

This year my favourite climbs have been those I've shared with my 5 year old son, if he keeps enjoying it he'll soon leave me trailing, but his enthusiasm as he tackled his first multipitch at Wintour's Leap was magical.
French Erick - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to jezb1:

Sometimes everything, other times nothing...can be a bit of a love/hate relationship!
bouldery bits - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to stp:

> Was chatting to a climber friend and he told me about an interesting statistic. Apparently 40% of middle age (40 - 60s) people get less than 10 minutes exercise per month. It seemed an astonishing statistic to both of us with all our friends as part of the climbing community. So one thing I love about climbing (of many) is that it gives a very strong incentive to stay fit, healthy and look after oneself.

That is an astonishing statistic.
profitofdoom on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to stp, and bouldery bits:

> an interesting statistic. Apparently 40% of middle age (40 - 60s) people get less than 10 minutes exercise per month. It seemed an astonishing statistic to both of us with all our friends as part of the climbing community

It seems astonishing but to me it is not at all surprising considering people I know in the age group.

It's on a gov.uk website -

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/6-million-adults-do-not-do-a-monthly-brisk-10-minute-walk

The funny thing is that walking is so good for you mentally as well as physically. Well it is for me. Who wouldn't want to do it. I just don't get it.

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