UKC

Blacks favourite winter ‘hikes’?

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 Graeme G 13 Jan 2022

Is it just me, or is advertising the Aonach Eagach as a winter ‘hike’ potentially dangerous?

https://www.blacks.co.uk/blog/stunning-winter-hikes

In reply to Graeme G:

Nope. Not when the first paragraph says:

Aonach Eagach is an exposed and challenging ridge lying to the north of Glencoe in the Scottish Highlands. It boasts two Munro summits (Meall Dearg and Sgòrr nam Fiannaidh) which are thrilling, giving experienced scramblers a grade 2/3 scramble. High fitness level and scrambling skill is required.

 Graeme G 13 Jan 2022
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

Grade 2/3 scramble is a summer description.

 wercat 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Graeme G:

I'd say so.  The word Hike instantly makes me think of hobnailed boots and an old ex army haversack and Weardale

 Harry Jarvis 13 Jan 2022
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

> Nope. Not when the first paragraph says:

> Aonach Eagach is an exposed and challenging ridge lying to the north of Glencoe in the Scottish Highlands. It boasts two Munro summits (Meall Dearg and Sgòrr nam Fiannaidh) which are thrilling, giving experienced scramblers a grade 2/3 scramble. High fitness level and scrambling skill is required.

And the article closes with:

'The Aonach Eagach Ridge should only be attempted by experienced winter hillwalkers and hikers.'

That being the case, I do wonder why it is listed as a potential 'hike'. There are plenty of Scottish hills which offer a good winter day out without the potential risks to be encountered on the Aonach Eagach. 

 Ramblin dave 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Harry Jarvis:

Presumably because they asked someone to pick their favourite winter day in Scotland and that's what they picked? With due respect to the people who compile the Blacks blog, I wouldn't assume that too much editorial coordination has gone on here.

In reply to Graeme G:

Another thread used the word "hike". More than 50 years ago we used the word, but to describe general walking,  much as we might say "rambling". Hiking boots were walking boots. 

This newish usage, referring to fell/hill walking/scrambling, seems to originate from US owned/influenced publishing franchises. Youngsters getting their prompts from such sources know no better. It's quite grating for experienced mountain folk who feel they are being asked if the Black Cuillin/Aonach Eagach/CMD/Crib Goch etc would make a nice walk.

 Graeme G 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Pete Pozman:

That’s my thinking. ‘Hiking’ is a word you use to make ‘walking’ sound more interesting to kids.

”Hey kids, fancy going for a walk?” 

 Basemetal 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Graeme G:

At least it's gatekeepered by the stiff ascent of AmBodach to deter the casual?  I do have a fondness for the culture of understatement though, as in "it's probably more of an entertaining saunter"...

In reply to Pete Pozman:

I certainly used the term (e.g. in Scouting circles) 30+ years ago, so it isn't *new*.

To me going for a walk is a wander round the block or through a local park for an hour or so, whereas going for a hike involves putting your boots on, packing a rucksack and going to do something more serious probably taking all day or more, usually of a hillwalking type nature, though I'd not call a scramble a "hike".

We did have a joke in Manchester SSAGO (Uni Scout and Guide society) in the 90s that there were only two options, a "big hike" or a "little bimble"...

Post edited at 10:52
 wercat 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Neil Williams:

my father as a boy in the scouts did "hikes" in the 1940s.  I'm sure "Hiking boots" was often used on Blue Peter, particularly by John Noakes.  It must have been long established by then

 d_b 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Neil Williams:

Where does the Bogle fit in?  It never really leaves Manchester, so clearly a bimble.

In reply to d_b:

> Where does the Bogle fit in?  It never really leaves Manchester, so clearly a bimble.

I think we can let that one have a category of its own...a "stroll", no?

(3 x veteran...sadly I don't think it's a thing any more!)

In reply to Graeme G:

Well at least it didn't turn out to be another contentious diversity thread with an outrageous punctuation error in the title.

 d_b 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Neil Williams:

I think it died out when Manc Uni ate UMIST, but I know a few people in the club so maybe it can be resurrected.

In reply to d_b:

Would be great to see it back.

In reply to Graeme G:

Someone should probably tell Andy Kirkpatrick to stop calling Everest a long walk too.

 ScraggyGoat 13 Jan 2022
In reply to tehmarks:

I doubt it, I know a man who did the big hill (and not from the Nepal side) and decided it wasn’t worth taking an ice axe.  

 d_b 13 Jan 2022
In reply to tehmarks:

It's about 11km each way and 3500m of ascent.  A medium walk at best.

 wercat 13 Jan 2022
In reply to d_b:

so shoes rather than flip-flops then?

 d_b 13 Jan 2022
In reply to wercat:

I'll go with walking trainers or running shoes for comfort.  Maybe microspikes for the top.

Post edited at 14:25
 graeme jackson 13 Jan 2022
In reply to Pete Pozman:

> Another thread used the word "hike". More than 50 years ago we used the word, but to describe general walking,  much as we might say "rambling". Hiking boots were walking boots. 

As has been pointed out further up, the scouts have been using the term 'Hike' to describe every kind of walking for at least 50 years even having a '12 mile hike' in the scout standard. I did all my hiking, walking, scrambling and winter 'mountaineering'* in a pair of Hawkins 'The Scafell' Hiking boots until I was nearly 20 and the LD mountain centre started stocking Scarpa. 

* Mountaineering in the sense of Hiking up mountains covered in snow. Wooden walking axes but no crampons back then. 

In reply to ScraggyGoat:

> I doubt it, I know a man who did the big hill (and not from the Nepal side) and decided it wasn’t worth taking an ice axe.  

A friend who climbed Ama Dablam only ever used their ice axe for chopping ice for brews.

 Doug 13 Jan 2022
In reply to graeme jackson:

Does anyone go 'hike camping' anymore ?

In reply to Doug:

> Does anyone go 'hike camping' anymore ?

I'd say Yes, people do.  There are always tents around Styhead and Sprinkling tarns when I'm there in the early mornings. I've also seen tents in Glencoe n the past few years. Sadly, my camping trips are usually in valley campsites with everything in the back of the car. It's probably been 15 years or more since I've gone into the hills with a few days supplies on my back. Maybe a New years resolution in the making?

In reply to wercat:

> I'd say so.  The word Hike instantly makes me think of hobnailed boots and an old ex army haversack and Weardale

I think of "hiking" as a word people who never go walking use instead of "walking". Probably obsolete/old-fashioned.

Post edited at 00:27

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