/ When did you last use a credit card?

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BnB 13 Sep 2019

I’m flabbergasted at the cash vs card thread. I might have misinterpreted some posts but it sounds like you’re mostly still using cards. I have barely touched a card since I installed ApplePay last winter. Am I seriously one of only a few here?

Contactless without the annoying £30 limit and with a device that’s already to hand every waking second. Granted the security of a limit has its comforts but it’s a paradigm shift I can live with.

Post edited at 20:40
9
Moley 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Because some of us are so old fashioned I haven't a clue what Apple pay is, how it works or what the technology is. Certainly don't own it, but great, you are the future and I am the past

2
Yanis Nayu 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I nearly always use Apple Pay now. 

marsbar 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I don’t use apple pay or whatever the android version is.  Credit cards are small and not particularly inconvenient.  

I don’t have my phone on me at all times.  Sometimes I want peace and quiet. 

Also what if my battery runs out?

Post edited at 20:48
1
kathrync 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I use Android Pay for most things, but I only have one card linked to it so I use physical cards if I want to spend off something else. Also, there are a couple of places around where I work that still don't have Contactless machines of any form, so you have to use chip and pin.

Post edited at 20:54
BnB 13 Sep 2019
In reply to Moley:

I don’t mind admitting I was a bit apprehensive. But there’s no going back now. Makes transactions like buying train tickets so easy. Purchase on Trainline using ApplePay and the ticket appears in your phone wallet. No ticket queues ever again.

MG 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I don't actually know. I use my phone and it goes beep. Are you saying this doesn't have the £30 limit of a card? Seems odd but I'll try it. 

nathan79 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I don't use Apple anything, but it still amazes me when I see someone pay for stuff with a watch. 

BnB 13 Sep 2019
In reply to MG:

> I don't actually know. I use my phone and it goes beep. Are you saying this doesn't have the £30 limit of a card? Seems odd but I'll try it. 

After a year this feature still comes as a surprise to many merchants. Be sure to check the decimal point is in the right place on the device before you tap!

Eric9Points 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Does it tell you how much you've got in your account?

BnB 13 Sep 2019
In reply to Eric9Points:

> Does it tell you how much you've got in your account?

It shows your recent transactions but not your limit or account . However it links to my bank app which shows the card limit and latest bank statement. It’s all incredibly slick and well integrated, using facial recognition for easy and (I hope) secure access.

wbo2 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:I tend to prefer a card,  increasingly using an app called Vipps that's becoming pretty ubiquitous in Norway 

skog 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I don't personally find Apple kit to be worth the premium, so I've never used ApplePay.

My understanding of it, though, is that using ApplePay is using your credit card - it's just that you have to pull out your phone and use an app instead of pulling out your card and using it.

Aside from potentially avoiding the £30 limit, are there any other advantages? It's just that I find my card pretty convenient as it is, and I don't have to keep it charged or avoid getting it wet.

Deleted bagger 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I live half the time on a island off the west coast of Scotland. There cash is king. Although I have to say that using Clydesdale Bank £50 notes in Yorkshire can be problematic........... ;-)

BnB 13 Sep 2019
In reply to skog:

Then perhaps it isn’t for you. But if, like me and pretty much everyone I know and definitely anyone born after 1995, your phone is constantly to hand, it’s just that much quicker and slicker.

And that’s before you factor in the benefits of using it to buy items online or in-app without entering card details.

Or ponder security. How many merchants would you like to think are processing and maybe storing your card details? With ApplePay, they just see Apple. The card is hidden behind the interface. Presumably the same goes for GooglePay etc. Not to mention that your card can be tapped for £30 multiple times if you drop it. Not so with a biometrically secure device.

PS. iPhones are waterproof to 2m for 30 minutes apparently. Although I haven’t tested that beyond happily using it in the rain.

2
Yanis Nayu 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I rarely forget my wallet, but I never forget my ‘phone...

tjdodd 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I'm flabbergasted that people still shell out for overpriced, inferior products that they think make them look cool.  And, from a company that treats its workers like sh$t, avoids tax, deliberately degrades the performance of its products to ensure people buy the latest version and therefore wasting valuable natural resources.

5
LastBoyScout 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Out of interest, how does Apple/Android pay reconcile with section 75 payment protection when linked to a credit card?

Seems a bit of a minefield and likely not covered, so I wouldn't pay for anything over £100 using it.

Moley 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I'm guessing I would have to buy a smart phone and pay a contract before I could spend my money?

I'll stick to credit card and cash for as long as I can.

JLS 13 Sep 2019
In reply to Yanis Nayu:

> I rarely forget my wallet, but I never forget my ‘phone...

I don’t know where my phone is half the time, I occasionally forget my wallet, but I’ve got an emergency tenner planked in the car.  

Robert Durran 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

> I have barely touched a card since I installed ApplePay last winter. Am I seriously one of only a few here?

Never even heard of ApplePay before.

tom_in_edinburgh 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

> PS. iPhones are waterproof to 2m for 30 minutes apparently. Although I haven’t tested that beyond happily using it in the rain.

My daughter's wasn't when she dropped it in the bog

wintertree 13 Sep 2019
In reply to skog:

> Aside from potentially avoiding the £30 limit, are there any other advantages? It's just that I find my card pretty convenient as it is, and I don't have to keep it charged or avoid getting it wet.

My phone’s Apple Pay is security locked to my face - previously to my fingerprint.  So if anyone steals it they’re not spending a penny.  Whereas a contactless credit card can be used without any ID or check.  I can also effectively remote destruct my iPhone if it’s stolen.  

My phone keeps an electronic log of payments made so I no longer have to collect and keep paper receipts to reconcile as part of my weekly book keeping.

My phone is perfectly waterproof and has never run out of battery on me yet.

My phone is in my pocket, where as my credit card is in a wallet with other wireless cards, itself in my pocket.  Phone is easier to get to.

balmybaldwin 13 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

> .... Purchase on Trainline using ApplePay and the ticket appears in your phone wallet. No ticket queues ever again.

How do you get your phone through the slot in the turnstyle?

freeflyer 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Good points, coupla things though. Is your phone jail-broken? I hope not. Do you know what to do if your phone is lost or stolen? For example would you have to cancel the up to 8 registered cards? Do you know how to access your Apple account without your phone? Do you know your Apple ID and password? Do not answer this question online. Does your phone case contain a magnetic close clip? All that said, it would solve a problem I had recently with HSBC where they failed three times in a row to send me a wifi-enabled credit card, and I ended up closing the account. Thanks for the heads-up.

summo 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Card pin or contactless and swish, phone payment that works on every phone and every bank, no balance held on it, just authorises bank to bank transfer but you don't ever need to know the other person's bank details. Oh and it's free, no minimum spend etc. Only works in sweden, but about to be extended to four more countries. 

Many places in sweden are gong cash free, but even some random temporary stall popping up in summer with a granny selling cakes for the village hall would have a swish number. I don't think I've encountered anything that's truly cash only for a couple of years. 

BnB 14 Sep 2019
In reply to wintertree:

> My phone keeps an electronic log of payments made so I no longer have to collect and keep paper receipts to reconcile as part of my weekly book keeping.  

I forgot this in my list of benefits. Yet it’s one of the most convenient features. No waiting for a paper receipt, nor storing it in an ever fattening wallet. Just tap and walk away.

Post edited at 07:11
BnB 14 Sep 2019
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:

> My daughter's wasn't when she dropped it in the bog

Sorry to hear that. It’s only the iPhone X series with facial recognition that claims to be waterproof.

BnB 14 Sep 2019
In reply to freeflyer:

> Good points, coupla things though. Is your phone jail-broken? I hope not. Do you know what to do if your phone is lost or stolen? For example would you have to cancel the up to 8 registered cards? Do you know how to access your Apple account without your phone? Do you know your Apple ID and password? Do not answer this question online. Does your phone case contain a magnetic close clip? All that said, it would solve a problem I had recently with HSBC where they failed three times in a row to send me a wifi-enabled credit card, and I ended up closing the account. Thanks for the heads-up.

As it happens I can answer all those questions with confidence. But you raise some good points about understanding the infrastructure and security behind the device.

wbo2 14 Sep 2019
In reply to summo:  sounds very similar to Vipps, be interesting to see what comes out 'on top'.

Re. The tenner in the car - I've got one, but not sure what I'd buy with it beyond food.  ... 

BnB 14 Sep 2019
In reply to LastBoyScout:

> Out of interest, how does Apple/Android pay reconcile with section 75 payment protection when linked to a credit card?

> Seems a bit of a minefield and likely not covered, so I wouldn't pay for anything over £100 using it.

There is no difference with using a physical card. The ApplePay interface is an alias for your card, not an extra payment intermediary. So your protections are intact.

Jeez. I’m beginning to sound like an Apple salesman when I intended the thread to be about a variety of cash alternative fintech apps. I just happen to have an iPhone rather than an Android phone. 

summo 14 Sep 2019
In reply to wbo2:

> sounds very similar to Vipps, be interesting to see what comes out 'on top'.

Yeah. I suspect one will buy the other out eventually. 

Doug 14 Sep 2019
In reply to summo:

I remember trying to catch a bus from a railway station to a hotel somewhere in Sweden (Västerås  ?) some 5-6 years ago and the only way to pay for the ticket was with a phone - but at the time I didn't have a smart phone, only an old Nokia. Luckily a passing Swede took pity on me & paid for me. So a good system but can cause problems for visitors

girlymonkey 14 Sep 2019
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:

As a tangent, I find it ridiculous that compnies still make smart phones which aren't waterproof. In this supposed green age where we are meant to be throwing fewer things away etc, surely waterproof phones should be standard?! Mine have all been waterproof, so it's not like the technology isn't there, and none of mine have been super fancy or expensive either. 

EdS 14 Sep 2019
In reply to Deleted bagger:

I find that hard to believe.......Yorkshire folk refusing money.

Around these parts the pubs will take just about any currency....and probably kidneys and first born

marsbar 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB: or anyone using Google pay 

OK so it seems I could set up Google pay on my phone.  

As it isn't a new phone, no fingerprints or face recognition, does this mean the only thing keeping it safe is the unlock pattern?  Or will it use a PIN?  

Can I set up more than one card?  Currently the way I manage  my spending I use one card for food and petrol, and another for "treats".  I don't generally use my main current account debit card, but occasionally I do.  

I would say I feel old, but actually I know a lot of teenagers use cards too.  

rogerwebb 14 Sep 2019
In reply to girlymonkey:

At a further tangent. What is the lightest smart phone available?

I got an 'upgrade' of my Sony compact to their latest compact. It is now sufficiently heavy and bulky as to make me think twice about taking it on the hill. 

girlymonkey 14 Sep 2019
In reply to rogerwebb:

Interesting question, and I don't know the answer. I have accepted heavy to get shockproof along with waterproof. I am not gentle with phones, so light is not something I look for.

rogerwebb 14 Sep 2019
In reply to girlymonkey:

> Interesting question, and I don't know the answer. I have accepted heavy to get shockproof along with waterproof. I am not gentle with phones, so light is not something I look for.

Me too in the past, but this thing  has edged past the insignificant when running or packing for an Alp. 

Alkis 14 Sep 2019
In reply to tjdodd:

> I'm flabbergasted that people still shell out for overpriced, inferior products that they think make them look cool.

This "inferior" claim has been aimed at them for many years and has not been true pretty much since the 5s got released in 2013. As a developer that targets both iOS and Android, Apple's CPUs, GPUs and driver support are amazing. Android phone manufacturers are playing by the late 90's/early00's Intel PC market rules of "big numbers are good numbers". Yeah, let's advertise 8 cores. Even if only four are active at a time and each one is slow as all hell.

> And, from a company that treats its workers like sh$t

You're referring to Foxconn. You may want to check what else Foxconn manufactures, because their customers base is "slightly" larger than Apple.

> avoids tax

Unfortunately so do all of these companies...

> deliberately degrades the performance of its products to ensure people buy the latest version and therefore wasting valuable natural resources.

Not true. They are quite guilty of something related, which I actually consider to be fraud, but not deliberate slowdowns. The batteries they used are not up to scrap. Once they degrade past a certain point they cannot deliver the current required to power the CPU at maximum load at its maximum clock frequency. The phone then crashes. Instead of admitting that, they added software that detects this happening and reduces the maximum clock frequency of the CPU. They only admitted this, added the option to disable it (which *does* crash the phone) and offered battery replacements when they were caught, which is pathetic, but laying the record straight here is important.

If they wanted to cripple their phones for people to buy the latest ones they would have just stopped offering upgrades to the OS for their older devices. You know, like every Android phone manufacturer that isn't Google does, resulting in millions of devices insecure through known exploits that will never be fixed without an OS update... Instead, iOS 12 supports every device since the iPhone 5s, which was released 6 years ago. iOS 13 is the first release that drops older devices (namely the 5s and 6).

Post edited at 09:24
3
marsbar 14 Sep 2019
In reply to Alkis:

Yes,  my mum has a very old iPhone but with a replacement battery it now works fine again.  It's annoying that you have to do "surgery" to replace the battery though. My phone you can open and take the battery in and out without tools. Not that it has needed a new one.  

In reply to BnB:

Because I use my Tesco credit card which gives me reward points which pays for 2 trips on the tunnel to the Alps each year. Also have a Bpay/Pingit chip on my watch which is good for biking cafe stops.

Duncan Bourne 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I tried Apple pay in a shop last week. Handed them a bag of russets.

They looked at me as if I was mad

1
BnB 14 Sep 2019
In reply to blackmountainbiker:

> Because I use my Tesco credit card which gives me reward points which pays for 2 trips on the tunnel to the Alps each year. 

That's not a valid reason at all. ApplePay IS your Tesco credit card if that's how you configure it. So you still get your rewards.

summo 14 Sep 2019
In reply to Doug:

> I remember trying to catch a bus from a railway station to a hotel somewhere in Sweden (Västerås  ?) some 5-6 years ago and the only way to pay for the ticket was with a phone - but at the time I didn't have a smart phone, only an old Nokia. Luckily a passing Swede took pity on me & paid for me. So a good system but can cause problems for visitors

Yeah. Improving rapidly though. They are forming a group. European mobile payment .... something or other. About 6 countries (not the uk) who will enable cross border payments which will help tourists. 

What i don't understand are why certain countries like the uk are bothering with payment systems that only work for certain devices, brands etc.. if you go cashless you need one system universally accepted. 

summo 14 Sep 2019
In reply to rogerwebb:

> At a further tangent. What is the lightest smart phone available?

> I got an 'upgrade' of my Sony compact to their latest compact. It is now sufficiently heavy and bulky as to make me think twice about taking it on the hill. 

My samsung j5, 158g and amazing battery life even in the cold. Under £200, what's not to like. 

kathrync 14 Sep 2019
In reply to marsbar:

> As it isn't a new phone, no fingerprints or face recognition, does this mean the only thing keeping it safe is the unlock pattern?  Or will it use a PIN?  

I have only used Android Pay with phones that have finger print recognition, however my experience is that it has been it is available when your phone is unlocked whatever method you use to authorise unlocking. Mine will work whether I unlock my phone using my fingerprint or my PIN. So, I suspect that if you use a pattern, that will work too.

> Can I set up more than one card?  Currently the way I manage  my spending I use one card for food and petrol, and another for "treats".  I don't generally use my main current account debit card, but occasionally I do.  

Yes, you can add multiple cards. You set one as default. If you just tap your phone without doing anything else (you don't need to open the app), that is the one that will be used. If you want to use a different card, you need to open the app and select it first.

rogerwebb 14 Sep 2019
In reply to summo:

Thanks sounds good. Time to get seperate work and hill phone I think. 

Bob Hughes 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I actually find ApplePay to be slightly more of a faff when going through the turnstyle at a train station than a contactless card. It takes a bit longer to go through because of the facial recognition and sometimes doesn't load properly so you have to go into the wallet and bring up the card manually (which apart from being a faff, makes me feel like a hopeless fanboy). If I am arriving at the station when the train is already waiting or if there's a huge queue of people behind my I normally get my card out. 

neilh 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I find it interesting how my daughter and her friends use monzo  on their phones. 

Most people are very wary of these things because of phishing and hacking into phones. 

Nobody other than those in the know understands how to protect their  info .

the big fear is somebody easily being able to  get your info. 

Do you buy an insurance protection on top?

kathrync 14 Sep 2019
In reply to neilh:

I use Monzo when I am travelling and I love it. I just put the money I need into my Monzo account so if there is a problem there is only a small amount to be lost. It's so easy to keep track of what you have, especially if you are moving between currencies. Also, you can freeze the card instantly from the app so if you suspect a problem you can do something about it instantly. I don't think it is any less secure than having any other online banking app on your phone and probably more secure than most as it was specifically designed for phone use in the first place.

Post edited at 13:11
Bob Hughes 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Just to add to this... as others have pointed out ApplePay is still a card payment. The real innovation will come with direct bank-to-bank transfers which don't use card rails, which has become mainstream in some countries (I believe Swish is an eg in Sweden but definitely iDeal in NL / Sofort in DE). Consumers won't necessarily see much difference but it will take the card scheme & interchange fees out of the system. So actually consumers will see a difference: a reduction in reward points and probably the removal / reduction of the chargeback protection.

BnB 14 Sep 2019
In reply to neilh:

> I find it interesting how my daughter and her friends use monzo  on their phones. 

> Most people are very wary of these things because of phishing and hacking into phones. 

> Nobody other than those in the know understands how to protect their  info .

> the big fear is somebody easily being able to  get your info. 

> Do you buy an insurance protection on top?

I’m a lot happier letting Apple intermediate my credit card than some technically insolvent  fintech in a basement near Old St roundabout.

My card credit limit isn’t set high enough to worry about insurance. I’m more worried about the crooks at my own bank with their custody charges for assets that are rarely traded.

neilh 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

lol. I have gone well past the stage when my business debentures bother me.

mbh 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I use ApplePay more and more, and am getting to the point where I will leave my wallet and card at home. For a while now anyway it is only through habit that I have had them with me.

Bob Hughes 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

> I’m a lot happier letting Apple intermediate my credit card than some technically insolvent  fintech in a basement near Old St roundabout.

Monzo and ApplePay aren't directly comparable. Monzo is a bank, ApplePay is a wallet. i.e. I use my Monzo card with ApplePay.

marsbar 14 Sep 2019
In reply to kathrync:

I think that unlocking my phone and then checking which card I want to use will probably take longer than  opening my purse and picking the card I want.  I suppose if I set it to the one I use most it would be OK.   But I can't see any real benefit that makes it worth it for me to bother setting it up.  I suppose I am unusual in that if I'm popping to the shops I probably won't take my phone.   I do take it if I'm going in the car but then I will leave it in the car quite often.  I don't feel the need for people to be able to get hold of me instantly 24/7 it's annoying when I'm busy.  If someone rings I can call them back when I'm not in the supermarket.

I have it with me when I get petrol but then I can't pay at pump.  

However I am curious so maybe I will try it. 

Post edited at 16:29
hairyRob 14 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I use mine about 3 times a year. Every time HSBC blocks the card as they think a fraudulent payment has occured. I use my debit card 3 times a week - fuel, weekly shop and some cash for everything else.

Tom V 14 Sep 2019
In reply to rogerwebb:

I -phone SE is 113 g,  smallest I could find.

rogerwebb 14 Sep 2019
In reply to Tom V:

Thanks 

Tom V 15 Sep 2019
In reply to rogerwebb:

Manufacturer's figure- my £2 Wilko mini kitchen scales show it as 120 g.....   

BnB 15 Sep 2019
In reply to marsbar:

> However I am curious so maybe I will try it. 

That pretty much sums up my attitude 12 months ago. And it’s greatly surpassed my expectations.

freeflyer 15 Sep 2019
In reply to kathrync:

Each to their own, but what benefits do you see from having a separate bank account eg Monzo?

I just use a particular credit card (PO Money) when abroad; its main selling feature is to charge zero percent commission on foreign exchange transactions. I have to remember to choose the local currency on the card machine if necessary, and all my holiday expenses are in the one place. The card company deals with insurance, security and scammers etc.

I assume it would also work with ApplePay but as I've only just got around to using that thanks to BnB I haven't had a chance to see how it works abroad. I thought wallets were a place to put boarding passes

1
freeflyer 15 Sep 2019
In reply to marsbar:

> As it isn't a new phone, no fingerprints or face recognition, does this mean the only thing keeping it safe is the unlock pattern?  Or will it use a PIN?

Yes. No. If someone else knows your unlock code / pattern, you need to consider very carefully whether to use a phone pay system.

ff

marsbar 15 Sep 2019
In reply to freeflyer:

Sometimes you can see the finger marks on the screen. I'm not convinced it is secure enough. Someone watching might be able to see the pattern. 

tom_in_edinburgh 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

> Sorry to hear that. It’s only the iPhone X series with facial recognition that claims to be waterproof.

Yeah, I know.  Her's was older, iPhones are getting too expensive for my taste and I've stopped upgrading.  They also keep getting bigger which just makes them a nuisance to carry and Apple have not come up with a compelling technical breakthrough for ages.   I'm also completely unhappy with the way iTunes is becoming an advert for a subscription music service I don't want rather than a way of playing music I already own. 

iPay is interesting but I am increasingly concerned about cashless becoming a way of giving government even more control of its citizens.  The way Brexit is going and the increasingly authoritarian approach of Tories make me think that we need untrackable payments to limit government power.   I'd prefer blockchain with strong crypto and anonymity to any form of account based electronic cash.

If I was Apple I would find it an embarrassment when the key point they have to make about a new model is it comes in more colours.   They are becoming an overpriced fashion accessory.  I won't buy a new phone until the old one breaks or they come out with something really special.  Maybe a folding screen would convince me.

john arran 15 Sep 2019
In reply to marsbar:

> Sometimes you can see the finger marks on the screen. I'm not convinced it is secure enough. Someone watching might be able to see the pattern. 

I haven't used any phone payment apps yet (I'm sure I'd get looked at very strangely most places in Ariège if I tried!) but I'd be very concerned if you weren't able to restrict the payment app so that it only works after biometric login (thumbprint or facial recognition).

Neil Williams 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

> I’m flabbergasted at the cash vs card thread. I might have misinterpreted some posts but it sounds like you’re mostly still using cards. I have barely touched a card since I installed ApplePay last winter. Am I seriously one of only a few here?

I use an Android phone (Oneplus 6T) which is a bit cack handed when it comes to Android Pay - the face recognition is not secure enough to be used for payments, so you have to unlock it away from your face and use the fingerprint or PIN to make it work.   So I got bored of it only working half the time when it felt additional authorisation wasn't needed, which seems to be random, and so I just use my card.  When I had an iPhone I did use Apple Pay a lot (as that works consistently every time) but the Apple tax has just got too high for me, either for phones or laptops - it's simply not worth an extra nearly £500 or so for either.

I near enough never leave home without KWP (keys, wallet, phone) in any case.  The only time I ever go out without a wallet is when running very locally when I wouldn't have any intention of spending any money at all.

Post edited at 12:32
SDM 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I sometimes use Android pay but have found I have actually gone back to using a card most of the time.

Every so often, Android pay requires to verify a payment over the internet as a security measure.

Trouble is, many large commercial buildings are large enough to block a 4g signal. I'm not going to open myself up to using their insecure open WiFi connections so these transactions would often get blocked. If I'm going  toto have carry the physical card anyway as a backup, I might as well save the time and frustration of the occasional failed transaction.

There have also been a few occasions where Android pay had been rejected but paying by the same physical card is accepted. No idea why.

Add in the problem that facial recognition doesn't work reliably on my face and that fingertip recognition rarely works after climbing and I have been underwhelmed by Android pay.

Therei is also the issue that your card can now only be as secure as your Google account, although this be should be more secure than the old days of cards getting cloned at petrol stations.

And the worst part for me (which has me considering disabling Android pay all together) is how to cancel it if my phone gets nicked. If my wallet gets nicked, I will get notifications to my phone as soon as it is used and can block the cards quickly. If my phone gets nicked, they can use it for loads of sub £30 purchases and I will a) be unaware and b) will not have a phone on me to do anything about it.

When it came out, I​​I thought Android pay would replace my wallet for most transactions but it hasn't reached a place where it is capable of doing that.

oldie 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Credit cards? Only ever had a Debit card.....I am starting to use it contactless occasionally. No smart phone so can't use that for paying.  

earlsdonwhu 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

4949 6387 2331 7441

Expires 12/21

Used to pay a nice chap in Lagos.

Dave Garnett 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

> Not to mention that your card can be tapped for £30 multiple times if you drop it. Not so with a biometrically secure device.

It's the potential to drop my phone multiple times that bothers me more.

I take the point about the biometrics but slipping a card into your pocket is still much more convenient than even an iPhone.  And, to be honest, I think Apple probably know more about me already than I comfortable with, without having access to my finances as well.

In reply to BnB:

There is also the fact that I don't have an iPhone so it would have to be Android pay - which I guess is pretty similar. My Bpay (now pingit) chip on my watch strap is massively convenient however for situations where I don't want to be looking after my phone or my wallet.

Le Sapeur 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

Isn't there a 3% charge for using credit cards on ApplePay? So high cost transactions either come without the security of credit card refunds or a 3% charge.

BnB 15 Sep 2019
In reply to Le Sapeur:

> Isn't there a 3% charge for using credit cards on ApplePay? So high cost transactions either come without the security of credit card refunds or a 3% charge.

Not that I'm aware of. The credit card bills show the expected amount with no hidden charges. As far as I can tell, Apple is skimming the merchant and/or issuer, not me.

Lusk 15 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

OOOOOO, I know, that £30 limit ...

Flabbergasted my arse.

2
RomTheBear 16 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I've stopped using cards and Apple Pay. I carry GBP and EUR, in cash. I admit Apple Pay works extremely well, however I don't trust banks and I don't trust Apple with my data. 

1
Le Sapeur 16 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I think they used to charge but the law changed last year so I guess they need to comply. 

kathrync 16 Sep 2019
In reply to freeflyer:

> Each to their own, but what benefits do you see from having a separate bank account eg Monzo?

I originally got Monzo as a pre-paid card like Revolut.  I spend quite a lot of time in obscure parts of Africa for work and I wanted something that wasn't linked in any way to my main account. I have been hacked a couple of times over there and my preference is that the maximum I can lose is what I have put into Monzo (usually less than £100). The pre-pay was a hassle as it isn't always accepted, so when Monzo started offering real accounts I opened one (card now accepted like any other Mastercard with the protection that comes with that), but I still treat it more or less like a pre-pay.  It is also ok for travelling - 0% commission and no withdrawal fees for cash withdrawals of up to £200 over 30 days.  Also, the app makes it really easy to keep track of what I am spending when I am moving rapidly between countries (much easier than the app for my main account).

Post edited at 10:12
Siward 17 Sep 2019
In reply to nathan79:

> I don't use Apple anything, but it still amazes me when I see someone pay for it. 

Fixed that for you  

1
freeflyer 17 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

I've been giving this a go for a few days now, and can report that all is not as straightforward as it could be.

Train stations - you need to use the disabled access as that's the only place that has a QR code / barcode reader; forget trying to use the Oyster pads, according to the ticket attendant anyway. As a result I'm still going with paper tickets for my rare public transport forays.

I've had several instances where the app has failed to register, and in high stress situations like Costa, it's easier to just wave the cards. No doubt I am partly to blame owing to my cack-handedness.

Bah humbug - works well in Sainsberries though.

Alkis 17 Sep 2019
In reply to freeflyer:

I always use the Oyster pads, if you are using ApplePay they work the same as they do with any other card. 

freeflyer 17 Sep 2019
In reply to Alkis:

Thanks. On further investigation it seems that the station in question (Guildford) is outside the PAYG Oyster area so the pads may only work for travelcards, however I know very little! I'll see what they say next time.

Alkis 17 Sep 2019
In reply to freeflyer:

Ah yeah, only used it all the way up to Potters Bar, which is in the PAYG zone.

graeme jackson 18 Sep 2019
In reply to BnB:

They've started using mobile phone-pay in our staff canteen. the queues at the tills have increased greatly as each transaction is now taking 30 seconds or more longer due to the crap comms.  So much quicker and easier to give them a few pound coins.


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