Loading Notifications...

VIDEO: New Lockdown Training Series - Ep. 1 - Staying Motivated

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
 UKC News 14 Jan 2021
Lockdown Training - Ep 1

This first episode of our lockdown training panel discussion features Neil Gresham, Maddy Cope and Louis Parkinson talking about motivation for training during lockdown.



Read more
In reply to UKC News:

I really enjoyed this discussion and got a lot out of it. 

 Dave Todd 15 Jan 2021
In reply to UKC News:

Really enjoyed this.  Three very articulate and thoughtful climbers offering wide-ranging views on the current situation that we're all in.  There's plenty of high quality advice and insight in this one-hour discussion that should endure well beyond lockdown.

Great to have a balance of male/female perspectives as well.

Lots more of this kind of thing please!

In reply to UKC News:

Glad you enjoyed it and thanks for the comments. 

Next week's episode is on fingerboarding - if you've got any questions for Neil, Maddy or Louis feel free to get in touch and we'll get them answered on the show.

Nick

 xbraddersx 16 Jan 2021
In reply to Nick Brown - UKC:

> Glad you enjoyed it and thanks for the comments. 

> Next week's episode is on fingerboarding - if you've got any questions for Neil, Maddy or Louis feel free to get in touch and we'll get them answered on the show.

> Nick

Hi Nick

I have a question that I think would be interesting (hopefully!).

I have always thought that fingerboarding was discouraged until you reach a certain grade. In my head this was maybe around V5/6, though I’m not sure where I got this from. I have personally got to V5 ish with just climbing a lot - and no fingerboarding whatsoever, though to progress above this I would need to work on my sloper strength for example. 
 

Is this view generally still held? It was definitely the prevailing view at my local wall maybe 4 or 5 years ago. Obviously because we can’t actually climb inside atm it’s not possible to progress in this way, but I think the general message was that with fingerboarding you’re more likely to injure yourself/ it doesn’t really benefit you that much if you can’t climb at a certain grade.

I don’t actually have any sources to quote - just general hearsay and chat! Would be good to know whether this is actually right or not!

Post edited at 13:25
 dannyserc 16 Jan 2021
In reply to UKC News:

This was great content. Can't wait for more like this.

 wbo2 16 Jan 2021
In reply to xbraddersx:  I thought that too.  But realistically V5, 6 is english 6b, 6c, and that has some pretty small holds.. so fingers are as likely to be a weak point as anything else, and we train other muscle groups with 'other than climbing' . 

But thanks for this discussion.. if you're not motivated then training is tough

 timparkin 16 Jan 2021
In reply to xbraddersx:

> Hi Nick

> I have a question that I think would be interesting (hopefully!).

> I have always thought that fingerboarding was discouraged until you reach a certain grade. In my head this was maybe around V5/6, though I’m not sure where I got this from. I have personally got to V5 ish with just climbing a lot - and no fingerboarding whatsoever, though to progress above this I would need to work on my sloper strength for example. 

> Is this view generally still held? It was definitely the prevailing view at my local wall maybe 4 or 5 years ago. Obviously, because we can’t actually climb inside atm it’s not possible to progress in this way, but I think the general message was that with fingerboarding you’re more likely to injure yourself/ it doesn’t really benefit you that much if you can’t climb at a certain grade.

I think the general consensus is coming around to the dangers of fingerboarding being one of form and volume. The advantages of fingerboarding can be found at lower levels of strength, possibly 60-70% of max. 

The big advantage of fingerboarding is the control over load and risk. You can apply just the right amount of load in the best and safest way (i.e. never fall off) which makes it way better than pushing yourself on a systems board or crimpy boulder. 

The problem is that most people who haven't climbed much perhaps don't have the self awareness to stay in control or perhaps try to go full throttle in power and volume.

I'm no expert though - just repeating what I've read with some common sense thrown in.


Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.