/ The Cassin Ridge: Prepping routes to do in the Alps and Norway

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TheFasting on 07 Aug 2017
I have a few weeks of stuff I need to do with school etc before I can head up into the high mountains in Norway again. That always gets my wheels spinning and I always love to plan for future stuff.

So this is purely a hypothetical based on a lofty lifetime goal. I recently started roped climbing after many years of mountaineering. Don't go into my profile history and then tell me why it can never happen or anything like that, this is just daydreaming.

Considering The Cassin Ridge is about 9000 feet (about 3000 meters I think), with 5.8 (F5b) and AI4 climbing, committing and remote:

What would be a list of routes you'd like to have done to know you're prepared for something like that before taking the plane to Anchorage?
rocksol - on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:

Never mind a list I'd want to be completely competent up to ED in all weathers. That's quite a lot of experience and even then not a given
rocksol - on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:

Oh and throw in altitude as well

summo on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:

Double digit 4000m ers in the alps at D+ and upto ED. Some 5000 and 6000m experience else where in the world nearer equator, but remote and mixed route, Peru, Bolivia etc.. then perhaps remain current by doing 4/5 ice and 6a/b on rock locally, with lots of aerobic training.
TheFasting on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to summo:

So you think the D+ and up to ED routes should be all on 4000ers probably due to the altitude effects? Does it matter the distance the routes cover?
summo on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:
> So you think the D+ and up to ED routes should be all on 4000ers probably due to the altitude effects?

Yes

> Does it matter the distance the routes cover?

Yes
Post edited at 19:42
TheFasting on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to summo:

So I'm guessing it will be things like Frendo Spur (D+ 4), Innominata Ridge (D+ 3+), Kuffner Ridge (D 4c), Peutérey Integral (ED1), Schmid route on The Matterhorn, West Ridge (ED1) of Salbitchijen, Supercouloir (ED1 6), etc. etc.

Probably should take a trip for some other routes in Alaska before going for the big one too.
summo on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:

Best just get 1 or 2 4000ers at PD in first.
TheFasting on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to summo:

That's the plan for next summer, first season there.
Goucho on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:

As Phil (Rocksol) said, get comfortable at big mixed ED1 in a variety of conditions and weather.

Do Big stuff in the Alps.
Do Big stuff in the Alps in winter.
Do other routes in Alaska - some people actually do the West Buttress of Denali as preparation for the Cassin.

Have plenty of time and patience regarding the weather (I've spent several weeks over 2 trips there waiting for half decent weather on Denali and still crapped out on both occasions.

The two Tom's on here (Livingstone & Ripley) and also Will Sim, made ascents of the Cassin when they were only about 21 - although they are all rather talented lads - and it does get guided up on a regular basis.

However, it's a big serious brute of a hill, and bad weather in Alaska is in a completely different league.
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TheFasting on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to Goucho:

Do you know any examples in particular of bad weather you might expect, worst case? It might not be the most important but I might be able to find something similar in Norway in winter.
davidbeynon on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:

The guidebook I picked up when i was considering the (much easier) west buttress a few years ago mentioned that it's not unusual to be tentbound for over a week during storms.
wbo - on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting: have you managed to get away, tick anything like Storen this summer?

summo on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to davidbeynon:

> The guidebook I picked up when i was considering the (much easier) west buttress a few years ago mentioned that it's not unusual to be tentbound for over a week during storms.

Yeah, exactly. Storm bound. High winds, minus lots, dangerous amounts of fresh snow. Running out of food and fuel.... death on a stick.

The rangers do an amazing job, but even they have limitations on rescuing folk when it's proper bad.
TheFasting on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to wbo:

Not yet but hopefully I can get something done in September if I get lucky and the snow doesn't start to pile up before then. Did Via Lara (n3+) a few weeks ago. Personally I did fine but it did highlight that my climbing partner might be a bit too inexperienced at the moment.

Then the winter season starts and it's time for ski mountaineering and hopefully do some easier winter climbing on Skogshorn, maybe Vardåsen and some easier stuff in Jotunheimen. Working getting my 150 top-rope pitches in for ice climbing and doing some dry tooling will be my main focus.
TobyA on 07 Aug 2017
In reply to Goucho:

> The two Tom's on here (Livingstone & Ripley) and also Will Sim, made ascents of the Cassin when they were only about 21 - although they are all rather talented lads -

I've climbed with Tom R a fair amount, he's not that talented. ;-)

His blog on his ascent is excellent http://tomripleyclimbing.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/cassin-ridge.html
Albert Tatlock - on 08 Aug 2017
In reply to TheFasting:

Just a suggestion, perhaps complete several of Mr Cassin's European routes before travelling to North America, get the same grounding he had.
TheFasting on 08 Aug 2017
In reply to Albert Tatlock:

Yeah that idea came to me earlier after posting this too. That would be the ultimate way to do it. But didn't the FA party also use a long time? Should diversify some then
TheFasting on 08 Aug 2017
In reply to TobyA:

If lack of talent means a chance of success, I should have it in the bag then

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