UKC

/ Ben Fogle summits Everest

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subtle on 17 May 2018

I see Ben Fogle has managed to summit, just has to now get down off Everest - well done Ben!

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/16/adventurer-ben-fogle-completes-mount-everest-climb

 

 

2
To be Frank on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

That's going to piss Brian Blessed off.

1
handofgod on 17 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

And the Bear.

handofgod on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Also, a fine example; anyone with enough zeros on their bank balance can be walked up the highest mountain in the world.

 

44
john arran - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Also, a fine example; anyone with enough zeros on their bank balance can be walked up the highest mountain in the world.

I'm sure a great many people throw a great deal of money at it and still don't reach the summit, as it takes a lot more than money to achieve success. While it may not have been a cutting edge mountaineering challenge for many years, your dismissive portrayal of it is completely unfair.

18
handofgod on 17 May 2018
In reply to john arran:

Essentially still walked to the top, right?

13
WaterMonkey - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Essentially still walked to the top, right?


Have you ever walked in even a minor mountain range?

I'd imagine even a guided, roped walk up Everest would be bloody difficult

4
john arran - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Essentially still walked to the top, right?

Astounding abuse of logic. The pertinent phrase used was "anyone with enough zeros on their bank balance can", rather than 'one person with plenty of zeros did. Clearly plenty can't. It may be a walk in the park for top mountaineers but it's anything but even for many very fit and active other people.

I object to the media and public obsession with Everest as much as most climbers, and their representation of it as being incredibly hard is highly irritating, but that doesn't mean it would be right for me or for anyone else to equally misrepresent it as being incredibly easy.

3
Hardonicus - on 17 May 2018
In reply to john arran:

It is a fecking circus though.

2
WaterMonkey - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Hardonicus:

> It is a fecking circus though.


No it's just very busy. You still have to work fecking hard to get to the top!

2
Shani - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

Fogle? What's he done on grit? Blessed's onsight of London Wall in '81 remains the benchmark for all celebrity climbers.

john arran - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Hardonicus:

> It is a fecking circus though.

I'm not going to argue with that!

handofgod on 17 May 2018
In reply to john arran:

Summit K2 or similar and I would stand to attention.

Everest, is the mountain for the rich.

You pay your way to the top.

 

 

 

34
GrahamD - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Summit K2 or similar and I would stand to attention.

> Everest, is the mountain for the rich.

It certainly helps

> You pay your way to the top.

No, you don't.

 

4
Postmanpat on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Summit K2 or similar and I would stand to attention.

> Everest, is the mountain for the rich.

> You pay your way to the top.


Up the workers!

4
Flinticus - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Also UN's Patron of the Wilderness.

Pleased for him. In everything I've watched him in he seems a genuinely nice guy (all the New Lives in the Wild series etc. and he's a dog lover). He will, I think, understand both the personal achievement and its context.

 

WaterMonkey - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Summit K2 or similar and I would stand to attention.

> Everest, is the mountain for the rich.

> You pay your way to the top.


Tell that to Victoria Pendleton

2
thommi - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

oh yeah, K2s the lidl of the karakoram....

you need to get off your high horse and educate yourself a little. everest may now be commercialised, bastardised, littered and exploited, but easy it aint.

2
Hat Dude on 17 May 2018
In reply to Shani:

> Blessed's onsight of London Wall in '81 remains the benchmark for all celebrity climbers.

It's little known that Brian's ascent was recorded on camera by a well known  frequenter of these pages. Unfortunately, on topping out, Brian dislodged a large block which hit the photographer, who was only saved by his camera taking the brunt of the blow. Sadly the impact destroyed the camera and its pictures, however Brian's cry of relief on discovering the photographer was unharmed, has become a thing of legend.

handofgod on 17 May 2018
In reply to thommi:

There was a fascinating documentary on BBC 4 a good few years back about 4 extremely wealthy playboy type Americans who had never so much stepped foot on a mountain before. 

They decided to attempted Everest. Paid $$$ the cost attached to such a climb.

Anyway, from memory 2 summit'ed but were on oxygen from very low down the mountain. perhaps from even the North col, i cant recall. 

Anyway, what the doc showed was, if you got the readies you can essentially pay porters to carry enough oxygen reserves  for you to get to the top and back. But you need the money.

 

9
Rob Parsons on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Anyway, what the doc showed was, if you got the readies you can essentially pay porters to carry enough oxygen reserves  for you to get to the top and back. But you need the money.

That will apply to any mountain - or to any 'experience' - on the planet. If you are prepared to pay sufficient money, then people are available to make a serious effort to try to arrange it. (Whether you or I personally 'approve' of that concept in general is another question - but who cares what you or I think?)

I don't understand the distinction you're trying to make.

paul_the_northerner - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Its an amazing achievement for anyone regardless of bank balance. What bugs me about this is the quoted purpose of the trip:

 

"He and Pendleton, along with mountaineer Kenton Cool, took on Everest for the British Red Cross in an attempt to highlight the environmental challenges mountains face"

Surely heading out there and climbing it is only adding to any environmental challenge faced to the mountain? And there’s no way they’d need to risk a summit attempt to prove an environmental issue… I suspect it was done for the same selfish reasons which most people climb for (it feels good).

Rant over. Hats off to the guy, he has taken on some tough challenges over the years.

wbo - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:basically that its easy and everyone can do it by throwing money.  He's not at all jealous or bitter and is a real mountaineer because hes been to north wales

 

1
ClimberEd - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Also, a fine example; anyone with enough zeros on their bank balance can be walked up the highest mountain in the world.

Victoria Pendleton - on the same trip - didn't make it. 

So really not true. You can wing your green neck back in.

 

(I dislike people drawing attention to something that actually isn't that difficult, but that is another issue altogether)

 

3
Trangia on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Essentially still walked to the top, right?

That's your considered opinion is it? You've obviously climbed it to be able to speak with such authority. When was the last time?

4
Mark Collins - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Shani:

> Fogle? What's he done on grit? Blessed's onsight of London Wall in '81 remains the benchmark for all celebrity climbers.

He attempted Valkyrie at the Roaches on BBC once, but the crux moves did appear to be missing from the edit for some reason.

Andrew Kin - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

One of the few people on tv who gets involved in challenges and comes across as a genuinely nice guy.  He always comes across well.  Listens, trains, pays due respect etc.  I bet he is a pleasure to teach/instruct.  I know I couldn't do this in a million years regardless of how much money I have, even when I was young and fit.  Cant see the point in dissing someones achievements like this.

 

gethin_allen on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Essentially still walked to the top, right?


To be fair to him he has done some pretty impressive things in his life. Have you rowed the Atlantic as a pair? ran 160 miles across the Sahara desert? ran a 10k in 1:33?

I'm pretty sure I'm not alone in saying that I couldn't and acknowledge that this must have taken a whole load of effort.

JohnnyW - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

> Also UN's Patron of the Wilderness.

> Pleased for him. In everything I've watched him in he seems a genuinely nice guy (all the New Lives in the Wild series etc. and he's a dog lover). He will, I think, understand both the personal achievement and its context.

Agree. Whatever the issues with the popularity and allure of Everest, BF seems a really decent fella. He's done some other pretty tough stuff too. Physical and mental challenge is still there, whoever's paying for it.

Good on him

 

Dave the Rave on 17 May 2018
In reply to gethin_allen:

> To be fair to him he has done some pretty impressive things in his life. Have you rowed the Atlantic as a pair? ran 160 miles across the Sahara desert? ran a 10k in 1:33?

> I'm pretty sure I'm not alone in saying that I couldn't and acknowledge that this must have taken a whole load of effort.

Yes. I don’t dislike him and he’s plenty of achievements.

But he’s a very privileged bloke.....

2
Heartinthe highlands - on 17 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

Tremadog Hard Severe rock god takes on 'National Treasure' who climbs Everest. You gonna get outgunned btl....

Good luck to him. Nice bloke on the telly. His next project should be the SE pillar of Ultar...

 

2
Pedro50 on 17 May 2018
In reply to gethin_allen:

 ran a 10k in 1:33?

Huhh?

 

 

Graeme Alderson on 17 May 2018
In reply to Hat Dude:

Gordon's alive

Stuart en Écosse - on 17 May 2018
In reply to WaterMonkey:

> I'd imagine even a guided, roped walk up Everest would be bloody difficult

I imagine it would take a lot of willpower and determination, undoubtedly very arduous and of course objectively dangerous, as I'm sure the thousands of people who have done it before him could testify, which is why I fail to see why this is worthy of note in any media beyond beyond his own Facebook page, let alone on here.

Columbia753 - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Yes its very dangerous, death zone etc. But how many have done the Eiger, Mont Blanc, Jungfrau, Zematt, Matterhorn etc. Thats only the a small amount of the european climbs. What about Annapurna, K2, Denali, Mt Vinson etc.  Does it still cost £30000 to be guided up when you don,t really have the experience when your clipped onto the ropes put in by the sherpas. How many of them could do traditional trad?

Has the highest place on this planet not been abused by climbers who have no right to be there at all and so make it into a farce?

Accept my view could be totally wrong. Apologies if so. 

To be Frank on 17 May 2018
In reply to Stuart en Écosse:

I've conquered Mount Blanc twice in my lifetime (via walking routes), and to blow my own trumpet, it was a piece of the proverbial, and ran back down.  Admittedly, in third week of being in Alps.

Assuming BF went up Sherpa Tenzing's route, apart from being kitted out like a Michelin man, how hard actually is it when you've got sufficient supplementary oxygen to function errr normally?  A bit steep up to South Col and the Step, it's just a snow plod otherwise.

7
Sean Kelly - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

> I've conquered Mount Blanc twice in my lifetime (via walking routes), and to blow my own trumpet, it was a piece of the proverbial, and ran back down.  Admittedly, in third week of being in Alps.

> Assuming BF went up Sherpa Tenzing's route, apart from being kitted out like a Michelin man, how hard actually is it when you've got sufficient supplementary oxygen to function errr normally?  A bit steep up to South Col and the Step, it's just a snow plod otherwise.

Despite all the slagging off that Ben Fogle has been getting from various posters on this site, it is well to remember than when some of us here were born, there had been not one ascent of Everest! On the photo posted on the Red Cross website, it shows him without any obvious sign of using oxygen apparatus ie if the photo has actually been posted from the summit.

Fell free to criticise when you have actually climbed the dammed mountain when you might have some comprehension of just how hard it is to climb in the physical rather than technical sense. I know the ice-fall would be quite taxing for most. Considering what Fogle has achieved in the past, especially that Antarctic trip which had a fair bit of suffering, he obviously had to mental strength to cope. It was also his first real go at something much bigger than say the Alps. Well done I say, and for a good cause too, which all helps with that extra motivation to keep going when the chips are down and morale is low.

Post edited at 21:37
To be Frank on 17 May 2018
In reply to Sean Kelly:

I'm not critisising in slightest.  It was a genuine question.  I've never been to those kinds of altitudes and was just asking.
Reading up on Brian, all his attempts were oxygen free, and he only failed on his last attempt helping some poor bugger near the top.  Respect to Brian Blessed!

Sean Kelly - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Actually the photo on Instagram shows him on O2.

what the hex on 17 May 2018
In reply to Sean Kelly:

Agreed.

I also think it's pretty crass to belittle someone's achievement while he's still up there!

Give it a rest folks.

Sean Kelly - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Actually although he was using O2 it was not that straightforward as it first appears...

"The only blight on the Everest expedition has been a major problem with the Oxygen delivery system. At 8000m plus most people need supplemental oxygen in the thin air. At 8100m, just north of the Balcony, mine exploded. Luckily for me Ming Dorjee Sherpa was able to give me his mask, regulator and cylinder and he returned to the South Col without O2. Then our cameraman’s regulator burst at 8500m and this time Ang Thindu (in tears) volunteered his bottle and regulator. As if that wasn’t bad enough, at 8800m, at a life threatening height, My second regulator exploded on my back. To say it was terrifying is an understatement. My heart sank. If I was scuba diving I would have been dead. Luckily, the heroics of @kentoncool, meant that he gave me his only cylinder and mask. Kenton was able to descend to the South Col for an emergency mask. In total we lost 4 regulators and we met many other teams forced to abandon their attempts due to the problem. It seems to be a major issue on Everest his year and I hope we get to the bottom of the problem before someone loses their life. I’d like to publicly thank the selfless heroics of Ang Thindu Sherpa and Ming Dorjee Sherpa."

 

Columbia753 - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Sean Kelly:

As ive mentioned above, what has he or others ever done too deserve the right too be on there in the first place?  Surely its a privilege to be there and you should earn it?

12
Rampikino - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

It certainly feels a little mean spirited to be belittling the guy’s achievements.  Another UKC triumph...  not.

1
To be Frank on 17 May 2018
In reply to what the hex:

> Give it a rest folks.

We can't pick on a celebrity?  Give us a break pal!

1
The Lemming - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

When I heard the news on Radio 2 my first thought was......

 

....Good effort and well deserved.

But then, I am not a sad little keyboard warrior using a lack of financial liquidation as an excuse to not try Everest.

I did not try Everest, because I am not good enough. Doing Mont Blanc proved to me that I live at sea-level for a reason.  As it happens, I know somebody who has actually summited Everest and they are by no means rich with lots of zeros to throw at the project.  They had talent and determination to achieve their goal, and that is what got them to the top.  Ben also proved that he had the talent by making it to the top. 

 

5
To be Frank on 17 May 2018
In reply to The Lemming:

Somebody you know is probably the exception.  Any numpty can get up Mont Blanc, I was on 40 a day at the time.
I'd love to go up Everest but I haven't got the cash.  The simple fact of the matter is, 40 odd thousand dollars will get you up there and you hang the trophy on your wall.  Did you read read Sean's quote, everyone sacrificing their equipment for him?
It's a rich mans playground.

9
Co1in H - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Didn't 140 get to the summit on the 16th May?

pasbury on 17 May 2018
In reply to Hat Dude:

> It's little known that Brian's ascent was recorded on camera by a well known  frequenter of these pages. Unfortunately, on topping out, Brian dislodged a large block which hit the photographer, who was only saved by his camera taking the brunt of the blow. Sadly the impact destroyed the camera and its pictures, however Brian's cry of relief on discovering the photographer was unharmed, has become a thing of legend.

I did once witness Brian Blessed top-roping Pig's Nose at Bowles Rocks. It was a performance full of bluster, deeply affecting the audience. The vocal pyrotechnics rivalled that of two rutting rhinos. But he isn't a small wiry chap and I remain impressed to this day by the ascent.

aln - on 17 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Has he got down safely? 

1
gethin_allen on 17 May 2018
In reply to Pedro50:

>  ran a 10k in 1:33?

> Huhh?

Sorry, getting confused. That should read "ran a half marathon."

ablackett - on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

This forum would be a very different place if people didn't bicker about how much of an achievement doing a thing was, but, perhaps the world would be a slightly nicer and less argumentative place if we all, read Ben's words below and took heed. 

"I made a promise to him to live my life brightly. To embrace every day. To always smile. To be positive and to inspire.”

Well done Ben - you did a thing that you wanted to do.

1
Michael Hood - on 18 May 2018
In reply to gethin_allen: wow, that's great, now I can brag that I'm faster than BF

Unfortunately we're talking about many years ago

 

Billhook - on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

New TV series in production:-

"I'm a celebrity, get me up there".

GrahamD - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Columbia753:

> As ive mentioned above, what has he or others ever done too deserve the right too be on there in the first place?  Surely its a privilege to be there and you should earn it?

Err, how exactly, if not by pumping ££££ into Nepal's economy ?

GrahamD - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

> Somebody you know is probably the exception.  Any numpty can get up Mont Blanc, I was on 40 a day at the time.

Not any numpty.  I could point you to any number of lard arses sitting in McDs or the pub that couldn't.  In fact the average person out for an easy dog walk or a potter up Snowdon couldn't.  They are probably in the majority.

> I'd love to go up Everest but I haven't got the cash.  The simple fact of the matter is, 40 odd thousand dollars will get you up there and you hang the trophy on your wall.  Did you read read Sean's quote, everyone sacrificing their equipment for him?

> It's a rich mans playground.

Your green tinted lenses have missed the crucial point that being rich is not a sufficient qualification  1) Yes you need the money or backing - so what ? get good enough to get the backing or dedicate yourself to the fund raising 2) you need to be fit and dedicated to getting fit and a lot fitter than the average Jo on the Gouter route 3) you need a slice of luck.

The ascent doesn't come just because you have money.

On a grand scale of things, no its not a big achievement in global mountaineering terms, but in terms of what the average punter can do, it is a significant achievement.

MrsBuggins - on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

I havnt been onheigh mountens but have see picures of mountainers on evrest. Not saying fovle didnt reach top but n my paper today he is not wering gogles. I niw enough that i now thet sunlight is very bright on everst so were are his sunglases

3
planetmarshall on 18 May 2018
In reply to gethin_allen:

> ran a 10k in 1:33?

That would be impressive to see.

 

drolex - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

> I've conquered Mount Blanc twice in my lifetime (via walking routes), and to blow my own trumpet, it was a piece of the proverbial, and ran back down. 

Meh. I have vanquished Mam Tor, not on one, nor two, but on THREE different occasions, and believe it or not (you probably won't believe it) it was fairly easy for me. Even the first time, but I already had some experience of running after a bus and catching it, so I was admittedly in fairly good physical condition.

So how really hard can it be to go up Everest? It's not that different after all. Ok it's higher and all but overall it looks the same to me.

 

summo on 18 May 2018
In reply to MrsBuggins:

> I havnt been onheigh mountens but have see picures of mountainers on evrest. Not saying fovle didnt reach top but n my paper today he is not wering gogles. I niw enough that i now thet sunlight is very bright on everst so were are his sunglases

What about the flags blowing, any shadows... did the earth look round?

The New NickB - on 18 May 2018
In reply to gethin_allen:

> To be fair to him he has done some pretty impressive things in his life. ran a 10k in 1:33?

I’m not getting in to the Everest thing, I’m just not that interested. But assuming you mean 1:33 for a half marathon, rather than impressed, I’m surprised he hasn’t run faster. I’m nothing special and I’ve run a lot faster, I know middle aged lady club runners that run faster.

Sometimes it is easy to be impressed by things outside of your experience, I can’t comment on his other achievements.

Post edited at 10:30
6
ericinbristol - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Hat Dude:

<applause>

gethin_allen on 18 May 2018
In reply to The New NickB:

Still faster than I'm likely to be running any time soon.

Blue Straggler - on 18 May 2018
In reply to The Lemming:

> When I heard the news on Radio 2 my first thought was......

> ....Good effort and well deserved.

> But then, I am not a sad little keyboard warrior using a lack of financial liquidation as an excuse to not try Everest.

> I did not try Everest, because I am not good enough. Doing Mont Blanc proved to me that I live at sea-level for a reason.  As it happens, I know somebody who has actually summited Everest and they are by no means rich with lots of zeros to throw at the project.  They had talent and determination to achieve their goal, and that is what got them to the top. 

Ben also proved that he had the talent by making it to the top. 

Well said, The Lemming. Apart from the Mont Blanc bit, I have the same experience, i.e a friend who has summited Everest and who is not super-wealthy.

Like others, she had to "throw money at it", as our disparaging friends like to put it. She worked hard to raise such funds through sponsorship etc.

I don't know where Fogle's money came from but if it was straight out of his own wallet due to him presumably being quite wealthy, then SO WHAT? Is there any difference between my friend's money and Fogle's money? I say no. 

Also my friend is possibly one of the strongest fittest people I know, and she said it's not easy and it's not "just a walk". She's done the Seven Summits and I imagine some of the folk on here would slate that as just a glorified gap year

NB my friend - more an acquaintance to be hones - was Annelie Pompe who was attempting to be the third woman to summit without the use of supplementary oxygen, but at 7500m she decided to use it. She has held a freediving world record, 126m variable weight. She is pretty inspirational really! As is Ben Fogle, who is not "less authentic" than Annelie just because he is more famous. 

 

Post edited at 10:50
2
handofgod on 18 May 2018
In reply to Blue Straggler:

BF summiting is a great achievement and I am  pleased for him.

BTW has anyone checked the authenticity of the summit photo... ;-)

Indian climbers spring to mind.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-40859155

 

 

 

 

drunken monkey - on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

IIRC theres been a lot of mechanical failures in o2 regulators up there very recently. Very very strange for so many to catastrophically fail at the same time

Chris Harris - on 18 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Also, a fine example; anyone with enough zeros on their bank balance can be walked up the highest mountain in the world.

That would be why there's 100% summit success rate, and 0% death rate, among paying climbers. 

1
Toerag - on 18 May 2018
In reply to GrahamD:

> you need to be fit and dedicated to getting fit and a lot fitter than the average Jo on the Gouter route 

How hard is it though i.e. how many vertical metres per day? If you're on supplementary o2 what equivalent altitude does that work out at? Do people fail because of altitude-related problems which are impossible to counter, or indeed predict who will be affected? Is it simply a lottery based upon one's propensity to altitude-related problems?

1
teh_mark on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Highlighting environmental issues by climbing Everest in a style which has greatly contributed to environmental issues on Everest? Sure, that makes sense.

1
WaterMonkey - on 18 May 2018
In reply to All:

 

Jeez there are some absolute cockwombles on this forum aren't there!!

 

Post edited at 11:21
1
Wanderer100 - on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

I like Ben Fogle.  He's interesting, he pushes himself, remember the Antarctic crossing with James Cracknell, and he isn't full of bullshit.  I'm pleased for him. I've been to the Himalayas and climbed to 6200 metres and cant begin to imagine what it would be like at 8800 metres even with oxygen. 

Robert Durran - on 18 May 2018

For Ben Fogle (or anyone else) to be guided up Everest is a personal but not in any way newsworthy achievement in itself. It only becomes newsworthy in this case because it's Ben Fogle who seems to be an all round good guy and who already has some genuine achievements under his belt in Antactica and in rowing the Atlantic. A bit like Ranulph Fiennes.

WaterMonkey - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Robert Durran:

> For Ben Fogle (or anyone else) to be guided up Everest is a personal but not in any way newsworthy achievement in itself. It only becomes newsworthy in this case because it's Ben Fogle who seems to be an all round good guy and who already has some genuine achievements under his belt in Antactica and in rowing the Atlantic. A bit like Ranulph Fiennes.


Two people getting married seems to be newsworthy at the moment!

FactorXXX - on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

Do I agree with the wholesale commercialisation of Everest? No.
Would I go there if given the chance? Too bloody right I would!

Well done to anyone that summits Everest.
Fogle seems to be genuine in what he does and I'm guessing that he climbed Everest for the same reasons that the rest of us would - Because it's there.
Shame on all those dissing him and from what appears to be a mix of jealousy, ideology and a case of: "He's not even a real climber, I climb Hard Severe and I could do it in so much better style...".

Robert Durran - on 18 May 2018
In reply to WaterMonkey:

> Two people getting married seems to be newsworthy at the moment!


Only if they are already celebrities. Same idea as Fogle.

mbh - on 18 May 2018
In reply to The New NickB:

Wikipedia says he did the Great North Run in 1:33 in 2007, when he was 33. His own web page says he did it in 1:43. 

1:33 for a half marathon is 7:06 pace. That is Quite Hard. I know quite a few people people who can better that, but many more, including me, who can't over that distance, or even, (cough) over a 5k park run. The vast majority of the population couldn't do it either. Nor can most active runners, it seems. To take an example, in the Bideford Half,  which is pretty flat and had over 1200 entrants this year, so isn't  a mass event like the GNR but will have attracted all sorts of club runners and others who have done at least a bit of training, a 1:33 time would have put Ben about a fifth of the way down the male field. A 1:43 time would put him about half way down. Even that would mean he ran 13 miles at sub 8 pace. Which for someone whose persona is that he's a TV presenter who has a go, means he's the real deal.

Oceanrower - on 18 May 2018
In reply to gethin_allen:

> Have you rowed the Atlantic as a pair? ran 160 miles across the Sahara desert? ran a 10k in 1:33?

 

Two out of three ;)

Can't stand deserts!

 

Post edited at 13:21
The New NickB - on 18 May 2018
In reply to mbh:

Does it compare with the other achievements on that list. Is it as hard to run 1:33 for a half than it is to row the Atlantic or climb Everest. Both outside my experience, but I suspect they are much harder. I know dozens of people who have run 1:33 or faster, two in my household.

I expected the post to get a few dislikes, suspicions of elitism no doubt. Whilst I am no elite, there was an assumption in the post I was responding to that suggested a high level of ability to do a 1:33 half and I disagree with that.

 

1
WaterMonkey - on 18 May 2018
In reply to The New NickB:

I imagine for most people who run halfs in 1:33 that is all they do, they run as a hobby.

Ben has put his hand to a lot of things and set himself challenges in a lot of different areas. I like the bloke and have a huge amount of respect for his achievements (and climbing Everest IS an achievement regardless of what the couch potatoes on here will say)

The New NickB - on 18 May 2018
In reply to WaterMonkey:

Well lots of them will swim, cycle, climb, have a wide range of non sporting interests and full time jobs of course.

Its not a criticism, it just is what it is.

JLS on 18 May 2018
In reply to WaterMonkey:

>"I imagine for most people who run halfs in 1:33 that is all they do, they run as a hobby."

Na, I was doing more climbing than running.

Seemed to me, the semi serious hobby running club folk were looking to run 1:15...

Neil Henson - on 18 May 2018
In reply to JLS:

> >"I imagine for most people who run halfs in 1:33 that is all they do, they run as a hobby."

> Na, I was doing more climbing than running.

> Seemed to me, the semi serious hobby running club folk were looking to run 1:15...


Agreed. 1:33 is a very respectable time, but hardly elite territory. My PB was 1:36 and I was only running once or twice a week at most back then.

1
Sean Kelly - on 18 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> BTW has anyone checked the authenticity of the summit photo... ;-)

> Indian climbers spring to mind.

> www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-40859155

If Kenton Cool says Fogle summited then I believe him!

rocksol - on 18 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

300 hundred people sumitted in one day earlier this week At £31K a pop that's £9m in one day Not a bad little earner. Chequebook adventure and not worthy of mention

2
To be Frank on 18 May 2018
In reply to WaterMonkey:

> Jeez there are some absolute cockwombles on this forum aren't there!!


I'd be happy with an answer to a simple question, how much easier is it to operate at these altitudes when you're using supplementary oxygen?

On second thoughts, don't bother, I'm never going to go there.

WaterMonkey - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

> I'd be happy with an answer to a simple question, how much easier is it to operate at these altitudes when you're using supplementary oxygen?

> On second thoughts, don't bother, I'm never going to go there.

I’m sure there’s more to it than just lack of oxygen though!

anyway I need to keep you onside, I might need some Mont Blanc advice soon ;)

Timmd on 18 May 2018
In reply to Dave the Rave:

> But he’s a very privileged bloke.....

He is indeed, but globally speaking, everybody who posts on these forums arguably is too. I find it's a helpful thing to remember.

 

Post edited at 19:32
2
Dave the Rave on 18 May 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> He is indeed, but globally speaking, everybody who posts on these forums arguably is too. I find it's a helpful thing to remember.

Indeed they are, and we mustn’t forget that, but he is über privileged, from a wealthy background with lots of ‘contacts’, so his ability to achieve is enhanced.

Im taking nothing away from him, he’s fitter than me and I doubt I have the bottle to climb it even if someone said there’s the cash, have a go.

1
AJH - on 18 May 2018

Smile everyone - he's on ITV now!

Steve Perry - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Andrew Kin:

> One of the few people on tv who gets involved in challenges and comes across as a genuinely nice guy.  He always comes across well.  Listens, trains, pays due respect etc.  I bet he is a pleasure to teach/instruct. 

An ex girlfriend of mine was working in a large outdoor shop in which B.F came to buy loads of gear for some past challenge he did.  "He was proper up his own arse!" her words not mine.

 

captain paranoia - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Dave the Rave:

> but he is über privileged, from a wealthy background

Really? Uber privileged? Jobbing actress mother and vet father. Hardly the Duke of Westminster.

Bellie on 18 May 2018
In reply to captain paranoia:

Aye, just cos he sounds posh.  I have read one of his books and couldnt recall stories of vast wealth. Just a desire to go out and see the world and do stuff. Plenty of stories of him winging it on foreign shores.

 

Dave the Rave on 18 May 2018
In reply to captain paranoia:

> > but he is über privileged, from a wealthy background

> Really? Uber privileged? Jobbing actress mother and vet father. Hardly the Duke of Westminster.

Well yes. He’s more privileged than a family with a mother who knows every line of Corrie and a Dad that takes his dog to the vets a lot.

captain paranoia - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Dave the Rave:

> He’s more privileged than a family with a mother who knows every line of Corrie and a Dad that takes his dog to the vets a lot.

What a very strange thing to say. Those imaginary characters could be anyone; the Queen and Prince Philip for all we know.

THE.WALRUS - on 19 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

Hmmm. A walk-in-the-park that his climbing partner / elite athlete Victoria Pendleton didn't manage to complete...

The New NickB - on 19 May 2018
In reply to THE.WALRUS:

> Hmmm. A walk-in-the-park that his climbing partner / elite athlete Victoria Pendleton didn't manage to complete...

One of the issues with high altitude mountaineering is luck regarding how your body copes with altitude. Everest takes a certain amount of money, a fair amount of fitness, quite a lot of determination, in these circumstances probably not a huge amount of mountaineering skill, but lots of luck in terms of altitude adaptation. 

fred99 - on 21 May 2018
In reply to mbh:

> 1:33 for a half marathon is 7:06 pace. That is Quite Hard. I know quite a few people people who can better that, but many more, including me, who can't over that distance, or even, (cough) over a 5k park run. The vast majority of the population couldn't do it either. Nor can most active runners, it seems.

Most people who take part in Park runs would be more properly described as JOGGERS, not runners. 7:06 pace for half marathon is NOT hard. The problem is that far too many slow joggers like to refer to themselves as runners. It's a symptom of today's society that people like to claim they're far better at something than they really are. Any decent RUNNER would be able to maintain 6 minute miling for that distance (and indeed for up to 15 miles at least). When I was running regularly even the vets (over-40's to you) would be aiming at 6-minute miling for 10 miles (and a bit further) as reasonable pace.

12
GrahamD - on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

> Most people who take part in Park runs would be more properly described as JOGGERS, not runners.

Presumably that means most of us on this forum aren't really climbers ?

Wanderer100 - on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

What a lot of old bollocks.  

 

mbh - on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

Um, I still run regularly and find 7:06 for a HM, never mind 6 something,  bloody hard, so hard that I can't do it. 

Many can, but many more cannot. Check this out:

http://marastats.com/halfmarathon/

(Do you notice how few real runners, by your definition, attempt this distance? Only 0.2% of the  Bideford field I mentioned above would make that grade)

I am not claiming that Fogle is a star runner, just putting his time of 1:33 (it that is correct) in context. It means he's had a good go at it and achieved more than most could, even if they tried hard, no more, and that is all he wants us to think, I think.

jon on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

Elitist, moi...?

Robert Durran - on 21 May 2018
In reply to GrahamD:

> Presumably that means most of us on this forum aren't really climbers

Indeed. I'd consider anyone climbing below E3 (which just happens to be my current grade) to be a mere SCRAMBLER.

Rampikino - on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

Wow, you hoover up positivity like a good 'un don't you!  I hope you don't visit your local parkrun - the poor buggers wouldn't know how to keep up with your expectations.

We had 320 runners at Chester at the weekend.  Yes, they are all runners.

Let me just lean back here in my study and grab my Collins New English Dictionary...

Hang on...

Ah yes here we are on page 678:

run vb running, ran run 1. to move on foot at a rapid pace.

That's odd.  I can't find where it sets any standards to define somebody who is NOT a runner.  Perhaps my dictionary is defective, it was published in 2000 after all.  I think I will check some other definitions just to be sure.

pompous adj 1. foolishly dignified or self-important.

Yep, that seems fine to me.

1
fred99 - on 21 May 2018
In reply to :

My definition of a runner seems to peeve a lot of you.

How would you like it if someone who, once a year, on a sunny day, walked with a busload of friends up Snowdon (or Mount Snowdon as they would put it !), called themselves a mountaineer ? Or someone who goes on a team-building exercise and then calls themselves a climber ?

That is what is effectively happening in a lot of these runs. I know of women who are 50+years old who run faster than some twenty-something males who call themselves runners, and the women in question regard themselves as nothing special - just club runners who "make up the numbers" for their veteran teams.

There are many of you on this website who call yourselves runners when you are not, you are occasional joggers, who. In exactly the same way that, whilst I occasionally use my bicycle to go into town, I will not call myself a cyclist.

I am not elitist - but there are an awful lot of people around who've got an over-inflated opinion of their own ability.

11
DancingOnRock - on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

Have a look at the VO2max tables. They’ll give you an idea of how hard 7:00/mi pace is.

Anyone who runs is a runner, regardless of speed. 

GrahamD - on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

> My definition of a runner seems to peeve a lot of you.

> How would you like it if someone who, once a year, on a sunny day, walked with a busload of friends up Snowdon (or Mount Snowdon as they would put it !), called themselves a mountaineer ? Or someone who goes on a team-building exercise and then calls themselves a climber ?

Not peeved at all, if that's how they want to view themselves.

summo on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

They are all runners, it's only the pace that varies. 

Following your definition, many clubs need to rename themselves as jogging clubs. 

Tony the Blade on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

> I am not elitist

Your post indicates otherwise.

 

> but there are an awful lot of people around who've got an over-inflated opinion of their own ability.

If I run then I am a runner regardless of how many times per week. I may not run as often as you, nor as fast as you but that doesn't mean I'm not a runner. If I drive a car, I'm a driver - I'm not saying a lorry or bus driver, but I am a driver. If I only run the odd park run then I'm a runner - not a marathon nor ultra runner, but a runner nonetheless.

To be Frank on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

> How would you like it if someone who, once a year, on a sunny day, walked with a busload of friends up Snowdon (or Mount Snowdon as they would put it !), called themselves a mountaineer ? Or someone who goes on a team-building exercise and then calls themselves a climber ?

I don't think anybody gives a flying * how people choose to describe themselves.
Put your spade back in the shed and go for a jog

Rampikino - on 21 May 2018
In reply to fred99:

I think I need to go and have my eyes tested again.  I can see that you have posted a number of different words, but when I try to read them, all I see is "whine whine whine..."

 

Seriously, anyone who runs is a runner.  It's not complicated.

planetmarshall on 21 May 2018
In reply to DancingOnRock:

> Have a look at the VO2max tables. They’ll give you an idea of how hard 7:00/mi pace is.

Not really, because it's relative. It's certainly hard for me, and the kind of pace I can only really sustain for 5k and that's with training. But I don't really have any athletic talent.

A friend who is one of the most athletically talented people I know could run 10k and probably further at that pace after a year on the sofa subsisting on pizza and beer.

It seems reasonable to assume that Fogle has some athletic talent, but who knows? Maybe like me he just enjoys the challenges.

 

DancingOnRock - on 21 May 2018
In reply to planetmarshall:

The point was made that 7:00/mi is not hard. When in fact it is classed as ‘Excellent’, as opposed to good, above average, average, etc. 

As a ‘good’ runner, I’m quite surprised that anyone would consider a below average runner, not a runner. If they run, they’re a runner, regardless of ability. 

 

Same as a climber, mountaineer or cyclist. If you take part in those activities that’s what you are. Whether or not you excell or are just below average, it doesn’t really matter. 

Post edited at 15:08
aln - on 21 May 2018
In reply to aln:

> Has he got down safely? 

Has Ben Fogle got down safely from Mount Everest? 

EarlyBird - on 21 May 2018
In reply to aln:

With the amount of flak he's taking on here he's decided it's safer to stay up there.

iceox - on 22 May 2018
In reply to Robert Durran:

> Indeed. I'd consider anyone climbing below E3 (which just happens to be my current grade) to be a mere SCRAMBLER.


Hi Rob,

I've always considered you a scrambler.

Doesn't mean I'm correct.

Your pal ,

Graeme Livingston

 

The New NickB - on 22 May 2018
In reply to DancingOnRock:

We can safely ignore Fred99, but my point was that a 1:33 Half Marathon probably isn't as impressive as some of the other achievements on Ben Fogle's CV.

DancingOnRock - on 22 May 2018
In reply to The New NickB:

Yes. People’s memories are short. 

Rowing across the Atlantic, racing to the South Pole etc. 

Impressive.

Post edited at 08:12
Robert Durran - on 22 May 2018
In reply to iceox:

> Hi Rob,

> I've always considered you a scrambler.

Oh no! Did I offend you with that post of mine the other week? (https://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/ukc/andy_pollitt_and_louise_shepherd-684539#x8781658)

> Doesn't mean I'm correct.

Well you're probably right - I've never been able to solo down E4's in trainers, which is probably as good  a benchmark as any for the boundary between scrambling and c,limbing.

 

 

Post edited at 10:43
The Lemming - on 22 May 2018
Timmd on 22 May 2018
In reply to handofgod:

> Also, a fine example; anyone with enough zeros on their bank balance can be walked up the highest mountain in the world.

Tell that to the wealthy people who've died trying, I guess.  There still seems to be a chance of dying through plain bad luck. 

Post edited at 21:39
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