UKC

One Person Tents and Hooped Bivvys Group Test

One person shelters are not just for people with no mates. Whether you're counting the grams on a big backpacking journey, off on a quick overnight wander in the hills, packing minimally for a mountain running event, or just keeping the weight down on holiday, a smaller and lighter solo tent can have a lot of advantages. Meanwhile, for anyone prepared to forego headroom, a hooped bivvy bag may be lighter still. Here we're looking at both tents and bivvys.

Small tent, big landscape - the essence of solo camping  © Dan Bailey
Small tent, big landscape - the essence of solo camping
© Dan Bailey

Mountain tents occupy a spectrum, from ultralight to ultra-sturdy. In this review we've aimed at the middle ground, asking manufacturers to submit lightweight (not ultralight) three-season shelters, which arguably represent the most versatile tents for all-round use. Inevitably, the models on review range in weight and sturdiness. Some are better suited to summer, while others are built tough enough for snowy winter mountains. A couple are big enough to straddle the border between one and two person use.

Small, lightweight tents are ideal for quick hits from home, as well as more ambitious locations  © Dan Bailey
Small, lightweight tents are ideal for quick hits from home, as well as more ambitious locations
© Dan Bailey

There's always a tradeoff

Light, cheap and strong, goes the old adage; when it comes to choosing a tent you can pick only two.

That may be a cliche, but it's a reminder that any tent design is a compromise. Spaciousness versus weight is another calculation; and if that's not enough to be getting on with we'll also add ventilation versus warmth/weatherproofness. Each design will meet a particular set of priorities. Are you willing to sacrifice space for the lightest possible model? Are you less bothered by weight but prefer something roomy? Do you need it to be well vented and airy for warm weather, or a bombproof haven for windy, wet and cold conditions? How much are you willing to spend to get the features you want?

Since there is no single perfect tent, and any model will have both pros and cons depending on your intended use, we have not attempted to award a Best in Test in this review. However we have given Highly Recommended to models we feel achieve the best balance of weight, liveabilty, and sturdiness for an all-round 3-season remit, or tents which stand out in other ways.

Loads of headroom and a massive doorway, but in this case there's no porch at all  © Dan Bailey
Loads of headroom and a massive doorway, but in this case there's no porch at all
© Dan Bailey

Living space

In any tent or bivvy you obviously need enough length to stretch out, and sufficient width at a minimum for your body on a camping mat; more space gives scope to move about, store gear, or even at a pinch fit in a second person. Taller users will want to be particularly careful about interior height, because while you can get away with limited headroom for the occasional night, any extended stay in a tent (or waiting out bad weather) is only going to feel viable if you can comfortably sit upright without hunching.

As well as the tent's interior dimensions, look at porch space. Ideally there'll be room for footwear, backpack and even to cook in inclement weather (taking care not to gas yourself, of course). Naturally, porch space is not something really seen on bivvys, though even with this minimalist option having at least some height over the head can make a big difference to comfort and enjoyment.

For camping in winter you want something stable, snow-shedding, quick-to-pitch, and not too ventilated  © Dan Bailey
For camping in winter you want something stable, snow-shedding, quick-to-pitch, and not too ventilated
© Dan Bailey

Pitching

How it pitches can make or break your relationship with a tent. Is it quick and intuitive, or an annoying fiddle? If the inner has to go up before the fly is fitted then everything risks getting wet in the rain; but designs that allow you to erect the whole thing in one go are comparatively few, and may make compromises elsewhere.

Fabric

Tent fabric is a niche topic, but if you want yours to last then it's worth considering. All else being equal, a thicker, heavier fabric should be more durable than an ultralight one. Its level of waterproofness, or hydrostatic head, is a particular concern in prolonged or wind-driven rain, and especially for the groundsheet which gets pitched in puddles, knelt on and generally abused. In terms of the material itself, your choice is typically going to be between nylon and polyester. The latter is less prone than nylon to sagging when wet, and withstands UV damage better; however nylon is available at a lighter weight, and has a higher tear strength, which explains its use in many posh backpacking tents.

If you camp high, stability in the wind is a key characteristic  © Dan Bailey
If you camp high, stability in the wind is a key characteristic
© Dan Bailey

Poles

The pole structure is the basis on which your tent stands or falls (sometimes literally), and in windy conditions some designs are clearly more sturdy and confidence inspiring than others. What are those poles made of? Aluminium is light, yet robust and flexible; but not all poles are of equal quality, so that's yet another thing to bear in mind.

Weight and size

The weights quoted here are ours, not the manufacturers', and include tent, pegs, poles, guylines and stuff sacks. The dimensions are based on our measurements too.

With a bivvy bag, you're right out in the elements - for good or bad  © Dan Bailey
With a bivvy bag, you're right out in the elements - for good or bad
© Dan Bailey

Bivvy versus tent

Hooped bivvys give you a bit more space and comfort than a simple bivvy bag, but less so than a tent. In these days of ultralight single person tents, does the hooped bivvy still offer any advantage? We think the answer is yes, in some circumstances. For starters, they are generally lighter, and pack down smaller. You'd have to pay an awful lot for a tent that's approaching the weight of a decent hooped bivvy bag. They are quicker to set up, too, and take up less area, so if your pitch is tight for space then a bivvy bag may fit where a tent couldn't.

But aside from the practicalities, the particular attraction of a bivvy is that it puts you right out in the elements, with a view of the stars. Of course that's only going to be the case if the weather is nice enough to remain at least partly unzipped. Bivvying in prolonged rain requires some tolerance to discomfort, and you're likely to get both damp and claustrophobic. Worse still if the midges are biting, when it would simply be madness to plan a bivvy. It's generally sensible to save bivvying for decent weather, outside the height of insect season.

Without further ado...

Overall Summary

Make and model

MSR

Hubba NX 1

Price: £395

Weight: 1240g

Pros: Strong, stable, and spacious for its weight

Cons: A bit too well vented for colder weather comfort

Best in Test Highly Recommended Large

Marmot

Tungsten UL 1P

Price: £360

Weight: 1162g

Pros: Lightweight, spacious for one, and airy in summer weather

Cons: Not sturdy in windy conditions, and very draughty if it's chilly

Alpkit

Soloist Tent

Price: £119.99

Weight: 1278g

Pros: Stable in windy weather; great value

Cons: The standard size is pretty dinky; very tight on porch space

Best in Test Good Value Large

Macpac

Microlight

Price: £400

Weight: 1619g

Pros: Stable in wind and snow, with a warm inner for winter use; very durable

Cons: Limited headroom and usable porch area; poor ventilation for warm climes; condensation; heavy by modern standards

Samaya

2.0

Price: £1050

Weight: 1341g

Pros: Built tough for all-year mountaineering in the Alps and beyond; roomy enough (just) for two; superbly made; snazzy fabrics

Cons: No porch or insect mesh limits its all-round appeal; sky high price

Best in Test Highly Recommended Large

Black Diamond

Distance Tent with Z Poles

Price: £400

Weight: 820g (tent) plus weight of trekking poles

Pros: Lighter and roomier than most tents; comfier than a bivvy; easier to use than a tarp

Cons: Trekking poles are essential to pitching; no porch; hard to make fully weathertight; condensation is an issue

 

Alpkit

Elan Bivvy

Price: £99.99

Weight: 938g

Pros: Affordable, and well made for the price; the head-end structure is sturdier than a traditional single hoop

Cons: It's not great for condensation; a bit more headroom would have been nice

Best in Test Highly Recommended Large

Outdoor Research

Helium Bivy

Price: £200

Weight: 516g including 4 pegs and a guyline (not supplied)

Pros: Easily pitched and well-made, but the key attraction is its ultralight weight

Cons: Space is quite tight, and the price seems high for such a simple design

Best in Test Highly Recommended Large

Trekmates

Squall Bivvy Bag

Price: £100

Weight: 1068g

Pros: Affordable, no-nonsense choice for users on a budget; it's very spacious too

Cons: Heavy; not the best build quality; condensation can be pretty bad 

 

MSR Hubba NX 1 £395

With the Hubba NX1, MSR have managed to build a tent that's sturdy enough for regular mountain use, and generously sized for one person plus kit, without paying too a high weight penalty - a difficult balance to achieve. Spacious and well-made, it also inspires confidence in blustery weather. As a three-season all-rounder it's hard to better at the price, and if it hadn't been just a bit draughty inside for cold conditions we'd have considered this brilliant tent a shoe-in for Best in Test. While it's not cheap, for regular solo campers the design and quality should justify the cost.

It's light enough for challenging backpacking, but not at the cost of weather performance   © Dan Bailey
It's light enough for challenging backpacking, but not at the cost of weather performance
© Dan Bailey

Weight and build quality

At 1240g all-in (MSR say 1290g), the Hubba NX1 may not make the bean-counting, sub-kilo league, but rather than a hyper-light niche product, what you get here is a durable and user-friendly model at a weight that's still totally viable for most backpackers, bikepackers, summer mountaineers, and hillwalkers. For the space and weather performance on offer here I find this tent surprisingly light, and have happily carried it on big hill rounds where overall pack weight is of some concern.

I've always found MSR's tents to be well-built, and this one is no exception. Expect it to offer years of reliable use.   

An excellent tent for 3-season mountain use  © Dan Bailey
An excellent tent for 3-season mountain use
© Dan Bailey

Fabric and poles

The 20D ripstop nylon flysheet feels tough for its thinness, and has what MSR call a Durashield polyurethane/silicone coating for waterproofness. Its 1200mm hydrostatic head really doesn't sound a lot on paper, but fear not. We address this question every time we review an MSR tent, and to date we've never got wet in one.

It's worth repeating what they once told us:

'[In] every other market except Europe, the rating is around 1000-1500mm for rainflies and 3000mm for floors' they said.

'While our tent designers recognize that the perception is that a higher number equals being more waterproof, their extensive quality testing does not support that theory. A thicker coating may increase the mm rating, but at the expense of fabric tear strength. As fabrics become increasingly light to meet demand, tear strength becomes even more important to the durability of a tent. MSR's goal is to balance waterproofness, weight, and strength in every tent they make.'

'Our extensive in-the-field testing takes place in a very wet climate similar to Britain's (Seattle, Washington); we do not get wet in our tents, and stand behind their durability.'

The poles and other components all feel sturdy and well made  © Dan Bailey
The poles and other components all feel sturdy and well made
© Dan Bailey

Underneath it's a 30D ripstop nylon groundsheet, again PU-coated. This has a 3000mm hydrostatic head, which again in use has proved plenty to keep out moisture from the ground, even when kneeling on the floor. Its high bathtub-style sides add to the general weatherproofness.

The canopy combines 20D ripstop nylon and loads of 15D nylon mesh, but while the solid fabric is durable I have somehow managed to put a hole in the mesh - something that'll need fixing before it expands. 

With robust hub sections, the all-one-piece DAC Featherlite NFL aluminium pole is of good quality, and feels tough enough to stand up to plenty of hard use. Anecdotally I've heard of people experiencing failures to poles like this that dovetail at a hub, but having used such designs for many years I've never had a problem.

There's loads of mesh on the inner, which is good for warm weather but less so in cold wind  © Dan Bailey
There's loads of mesh on the inner, which is good for warm weather but less so in cold wind
© Dan Bailey

Pitching

Three configurations are possible: inner alone, for hot dry conditions; just the fly and a separate footprint (not included) for a tarp-like rain shelter; or the full fly-plus-inner pitch. The latter is overwhelmingly the most useful in the UK, with our rain, wind and midges. As with most double-walled designs, the Hubba NX1 pitches inner first, an obvious disadvantage in heavy rain. However it's so quick and easy to set up that this shouldn't be much of an issue.

To create a free-standing structure, the pole dovetails from a hub at each end, and since it's symmetrical there's no wrong way to align it. The inner then hangs off the frame via some sturdy clips to create a satisfyingly taut canopy. Colour-coded tabs make it impossible to get confused about which way round to put the flysheet, and there are no fiddly velcro loops on the underside to attach fly to poles - an advantage over some models on review. The tension of the outer is easily tweaked using ladder-lock webbing at each corner (on uneven ground, some re-adjustment may be required to ensure the tent walls are kept separate), and the corner pegging points are also adjustable for length.

Peg out the vestibule, rear wall, and guylines, and you're done in minutes.

Plenty of porch space for cooking, gear storage, and just stretching out  © Dan Bailey
Plenty of porch space for cooking, gear storage, and just stretching out
© Dan Bailey

Interior space

Though it's not the heaviest of the two-walled tents on review, this is easily the most roomy. With a spacious layout that should fit even larger users plus gear, the Hubba NX1 is well suited to extended use, and makes no compromises on liveability. 

An oblong about 76cm wide and 215cm long (it's hard to measure a tent's floor since the sides are not hard-edged, but my dimensions more or less agree with MSR's), the floor has plenty of width for one person plus mat, with room along the sides for bits and bobs. At 1.83m I can stretch right out without pushing up against the ends.

Headroom is even more expansive. The maximum internal height of around 91cm is enough for me to sit upright in comfort, and thanks to the steep side walls and the addition of a cross-pole that broadens the roofline, this generous height extends across much of the interior. This is a small tent that it's actually pleasant to spend time in.

There's a big floor area and loads of usable headroom thanks to the broad, steep-sided tent shape  © Dan Bailey
There's a big floor area and loads of usable headroom thanks to the broad, steep-sided tent shape
© Dan Bailey

Also good is the ease of entry, with large doorways on both fly and canopy. These open high, so that it's not a struggle to get in and out, and it's possible to sit right in the doorway without hunching. Since this is something I seem to do a lot - when cooking outside for instance - I've really appreciated the door height on the Hubba NX1. In warm weather it's possible to roll the doorway right back so that the entire porch side is open.

By the standards of a solo tent the vestibule is massive, with plenty of room for your pack and footwear, and for cooking in shelter should it be windy or wet outside. For gear organisation, you also get one reasonable-sized mesh pocket inside; one at each end would have been better still.     

Weather performance

In less than ideal weather, this is a confidence inspiring tent. With a sturdy semi-geodesic frame and taut fabric, the Hubba NX1 copes well in blustery conditions, with minimal bowing or flapping - particularly if you've pitched with its more streamlined gable ends aligned with the wind direction. Four guying points add extra support, and MSR have included all the guylines. You get nine strong square-cross-section aluminium pegs (to which you can't add cord loops for easier extraction), but a full pitch including all the guys requires 10, which is mildly irritating.

It's a sturdy structure that can take a fair bit of weather  © Dan Bailey
It's a sturdy structure that can take a fair bit of weather
© Dan Bailey

With large areas of mesh, the inner is very light and airy. To aid with the through-flow there's a vent on the back wall of the fly, which can be closed in poor weather or propped open with a little kick stand. With a double zipper on the fly, you can also leave the outer door slightly open to let air in even when it's raining. It's also possible to roll the vestibule side of the fly up a little from the bottom, to get more air in underneath - a clever little detail I've not noticed on a tent before, though it does need a guyline in place to work properly.

Four guylines give good stability in wind  © Dan Bailey
Four guylines give good stability in wind
© Dan Bailey

Decent ventilation for summer  © Dan Bailey
Decent ventilation for summer
© Dan Bailey

All this adds up to a very well-ventilated tent, which is of course great in warmer weather, when the Hubba NX1 is notably less stuffy than some models on review. Depending on conditions, condensation is often something of an issue in small tents, but here the effective ventilation means it can be kept to a minimum, and in this review I've found it to be one of the models least prone to the problem.

However, you cannot have your cake and eat it. In cold and windy weather all that mesh goes from being a blessing to a curse, since it makes the interior a lot more draughty than an inner with more fabric. As a result, I would not rush to use this tent in wintry weather. MSR describe it as a three-season model, and that seems fair, though in terms of British hill use you might be nudging your comfort limits in cold spring and autumn weather. Bring a warm sleeping bag! A tad more fabric and a bit less mesh would arguably have made for a better UK all-rounder.

Packs quite small for the size of tent you're getting  © Nick Brown
Packs quite small for the size of tent you're getting
© Nick Brown

Packing

Given its size when set up, the Hubba NX1 packs down surprisingly small, and can be dismantled with little fiddle. It's easy to cram everything into its wide-mouth stuff sack, while the addition of compression straps means you end up with a nice compact package to fit in your rucksack, or strap to the outside. MSR's stuff sack design is one of the best in the business, and small details like this genuinely make a difference when you're out there using a tent.

MSR say:

The Hubba NX solo backpacking tent offers the most livable accommodations in a lightweight freestanding design. Engineered for 3-season camping, the light and compact tent won't slow you down, whether you're striking out early to earn solo views along a popular route, or finding your stride on a 10-day trek into the Alaskan wilderness. The tent's optimized, symmetrical geometry and non-tapered floor maximize space—because you didn't head out into the backcountry to feel constrained—while other precision-engineered features, from the StayDry™ door to the adaptable, cross-ventilating rainfly, make the tent so livable, you won't want to come home.

  • Max Weight: 1.29kg
  • Rainfly Fabric: 20D ripstop nylon 1200mm Durashield™ polyurethane & silicone
  • Canopy Fabric: 20D ripstop nylon
  • Mesh Type: 15D nylon micromesh
  • Floor Fabric: 30D ripstop nylon 3000mm DuraShield polyurethane & DWR
  • Number of Poles: 1 DAC Featherlite NFL
  • Floor Dimensions: 216 x 76 cm
  • Floor area: 1.67 sq. m
  • Vestibule Area: 0.84 sq. m
  • Interior Peak Height: 91 cm
  • Packed Size: 46 x 15 cm
  • Optimized symmetrical geometry and non-tapered floor
  • Large, easy-entry D-shaped StayDry™ door and vestibule
  • Side entry zipper orientation
  • Rainfly kickstand vent
  • Adjustable rainfly (roll-up vestibule & stargazer view)
  • Adjustable integrated stake-out loops
  • Lightweight reflective guy-outs
  • Durable high-tenacity nylon fabrics
  • Reinforced Infinity bar tacks and lap-felled seams
  • Durashield™-coated rainfly and bathtub-style floor
  • Compression stuff sack with pull handle
    View website

    Marmot Tungsten UL 1P £360

    Lightest of the double skin tents on review, the Tungsten UL 1P will be of interest to anyone looking to save weight without sacrificing liveability. This spacious design allows some room to spread out, with decent headroom and a fair sized vestibule for gear storage and cooking. An all-mesh inner means lots of ventilation, making this a great choice in summer; on the other hand that through-draught becomes a big drawback in cold conditions. With quite a bendy structure, the Tungsten UL does not cope well in strong wind. It's best to treat this as a fair weather tent for the warmer months, and accept the compromises made to get the weight down.  

    Summer at Loch Etchachan  © Dan Bailey
    Summer at Loch Etchachan
    © Dan Bailey

    Weight and build quality

    At 1162g all in, this is a lightweight tent by any standards. This will be a big attraction for weight conscious users, and I can see it being a particularly good choice for summer backpacking, or overseas treks where every gram counts (on the plane as much as on your back). However the lightness comes with obvious disadvantages, both in terms of its ability to stand up to heavyweight weather, and in its overall feel. While the Tungsten seems well made, its thin lightweight fabrics and plastic components do not offer quite the same sense of sturdiness as you'll find with others such as the Hubba NX or the Microlight, and it doesn't give the impression it's made for prolonged rough and demanding use. As with a lot of lighter gear, the Tungsten is one to treat with a bit of care - less a daily workhorse than a tent to save for 'best'.

    It's not the most stable in wind, and best in more sheltered spots - this exposed hillside in November was pushing its ability  © Dan Bailey
    It's not the most stable in wind, and best in more sheltered spots - this exposed hillside in November was pushing its ability
    © Dan Bailey

    Fabric and poles

    The nylon inner is entirely mesh, and very lightweight at just 15 denier. Overhead, the 20 denier polyester fly is about as light and thin as we'd want to go: polyester is less prone than nylon to sagging when wet, and withstands UV damage better; however nylon is available at a lighter weight, and has a higher tear strength. Most high-end tents seem to go with nylon for the fly, so it's interesting that Marmot didn't here. We can't say we've noticed the difference.

    Underneath, the 30D sewn-in Nylon groundsheet is also pretty skimpy, and thin enough that you can see the grass through it. If you're camped on waterlogged ground its 2000mm hydrostatic head may start to look on the low side (we've noticed the odd damp patch in the morning, though not enough to get the camping mat wet). A footprint is available as an optional extra, and we think this'd be worth paying for in order to boost the underfloor waterproofing and help extend the lifespan of the groundsheet. That would, of course, add to a little to the effective tent weight (and cost), and with that in mind perhaps it could be argued that a floor this thin is a bit of a false economy.

    An airy all-mesh inner and a fly that goes on separately  © Dan Bailey
    An airy all-mesh inner and a fly that goes on separately
    © Dan Bailey

    The DAC Featherlite NSL aluminium poles are good quality, and sturdy; however the floating two-pole structure is less rigid than a design that joins the poles with a hub - something I'll come onto below.

    Pitching

    The quality of the pitch seems quite sensitive to uneven ground, so unless you're lucky enough to find a snooker table to camp on then you may have to fiddle around to get everything correctly tensioned so that the fly is nicely separate from the inner.

    As with many of the tents on review, the inner goes up first - and if you're pitching in a downpour then this is clearly a disadvantage since fitting the fly takes slightly longer than some designs. The inner clips onto the two crossed-over poles to create a quickly-erected, freestanding structure. The pole tips are colour coded for ease of use, and kinked at one end to give you a slightly more spacious door side compared to the back wall. Throw the fly over, then secure it to the poles via a series of little velcro tabs. These are a bit of a fiddle, especially with cold hands, but if you forget them then the tent will rapidly sag and deform in the wind, so it's worth taking the time. The four corners of the fly then hook onto the pegging points of the inner, and the tension can be adjusted using ladder lock sliders.

    While the corners of the tent are better pegged out, they don't absolutely need to be; only the porch 100% requires a peg. Six light but sturdy angled aluminium stakes are provided - just enough to pitch the tent, with a spare that you can use to peg down the back wall. Marmot supply a length of thick cord that can be cut down to make your own guylines, but you'll have to buy extra pegs for these. I think this is a bit stingy, and since the Tungsten really needs to be guyed in your typical UK weather it'd have been nice if Marmot could have included sufficient pegs to do so.

    You get just one small pocket on the inner  © Dan Bailey
    You get just one small pocket on the inner
    © Dan Bailey

    The ceiling light diffuser is a nice touch  © Dan Bailey
    The ceiling light diffuser is a nice touch
    © Dan Bailey

    Interior space

    Marmot are rather conservative with their peak height figure of 38 inches (or 96cm in real money), while I make it over 1m. Either way there's a decent amount of headroom in the Tungsten UL 1P, and at 1.83cm I can sit up indoors in comfort. Steep side walls increase the available height, making this a liveable tent inside for its modest exterior size.

    It's hard to measure the internal floor dimensions of a tent, since there's no hard edge to a groundsheet. The inner floor area is plenty for one, measuring around 88cm wide at one end, tapering to something like 75cm at the other (the translation of Marmot's inch figure suggests they think 91cm and 73.6cm). This is enough for a single mat with some width to spare for bits and bobs. Length-wise it's a decent 215cm or so (Marmot and I more or less agree here), and I can stretch right out without feet or head touching the end walls. Though it's reasonably petite on the outside, I'd say this is a good tent for larger folk.

    However, gear organisation inside is very limited, as you get only one annoyingly small pocket beside the door. This is a curious cut-off shape that readily spills things. More - and deeper - pockets would have been good, as I can end up losing track of small items such as torches, hats, and midge nets.

    There's plenty of space in the porch for boots and a rucksack, and if the door's open (to avoid gasing yourself or setting the tent on fire) then you can lean out of your sleeping bag to cook in the entrance. Outer door height is a little lower than I'd ideally prefer, but not by much.

    There's enough porch space for cooking, storage, and stretching out  © Dan Bailey
    There's enough porch space for cooking, storage, and stretching out
    © Dan Bailey

    Weather performance

    It may sound like damning with faint praise to say that the Tungsten UL is a fair weather tent, but if the cap fits... The combination of light materials, height, and a large unsupported back wall make for a tent that feels relatively vulnerable in wind. The pole structure is fairly mobile, too, lacking the fixed rigidity of its obvious rival the Hubba NX. On a breezy November night on an open hillside I felt the Tungsten was close to its sensible limit, bowing and flapping with each gust. At a guesstimate the wind probably didn't get over 20mph, so this is clearly not a tent for stormy weather on the hills at any time of year. Winter? Forget it.

    A mercifully midge-free dusk in Mid Wales, but with all that mesh it did get cold  © Dan Bailey
    A mercifully midge-free dusk in Mid Wales, but with all that mesh it did get cold
    © Dan Bailey

    While the 1500mm hydrostatic head of the fly doesn't sound a lot on paper, much like the MSR I've had no issues with rain in practise. As with any small tent there's a propensity for condensation, though the inbuilt vent flap should help here if it's calm enough to leave open, along with a double zipper on the fly so you can leave the outer door undone a chink. I'd say it has proved to be one of the better models in terms of condensation management, and some other designs do suffer notably more.

    Structure aside, the big issue with the Tungsten as an all-weather UK option is the fact that the inner is entirely mesh. This makes it a very cold and draughty place to spend time in chilly or breezy conditions - as I can attest from a couple of fidgety nights. On the other hand ventilation like this is of course ideal for hot summer weather, so whether you consider it an advantage or a drawback will depend what you intend doing with it, and where. The High Sierra in summer - ideal; October on Skye - less so. Overall, we think the Tungsten UL is best considered a 1-2 season, fair weather tent, which does rather limit it for all-round UK use.

    Colour coded tabs and tension adjusters at the corners  © Dan Bailey
    Colour coded tabs and tension adjusters at the corners
    © Dan Bailey

    The fly can be vented in hot weather  © Dan Bailey
    The fly can be vented in hot weather
    © Dan Bailey

    Packing

    Dismantling is quick and easy - unless you have cold hands, in which case the velcro loops and small ladder lock hooks that secure the fly can be a fiddle to detach.

    Tent bag, with a 750ml water bottle for scale  © Dan Bailey
    Tent bag, with a 750ml water bottle for scale
    © Dan Bailey

    As you'd expect of its lightweight fabrics, the Tungsten packs down pretty small. It's not a struggle to get it all into the stuff sack provided, so although it's not the shortest tent bag the whole lot can be squeezed smaller in your rucksack (though it'd have been nice if the stuff sack had included compression straps). However the storage bags for the tent, pegs and poles are as lightweight as the rest of the fabrics, and if you want them to last you'll need to treat them fairly gently; tougher bags would not have gone amiss.

    Marmot say:

    More space means more comfort, and the Tungsten UL 1-person tent delivers without adding extra weight to your pack. Zone pre-bend construction creates vertical walls for plenty of sleeping and relaxing space, plus headroom for stretching out after your solo trek on the AT. "Easy pitch" clips and poles make it easy to set up quickly. If a downpour hits, the seam-taped full-coverage fly and catenary-cut floor ensure you'll stay dry and rain won't pool inside. Stash your pack, poles, and other gear in the two vestibules and tuck a headlamp into the lamp shade pocket for ambient light at night.

    • Max weight: 1330g
    • Fly fabric: 20d 100% Polyester RS, Sil/PU 1500mm F/R
    • Canopy fabric: 15d 100% Nylon No-See-Um Mesh F/R
    • Floor fabric: 30d 100% Nylon 2000mm F/R
    • Dimensions: 97 x 92/74 x 214cm
    • Floor area: 1.9 sq m
    • 20d 100% Polyester RS, Sil/PU 1500mm F/R
    • Packed size: 45.7 x 16cm
    • Zone Pre-Bend Construction Creates Vertical Walls, More Roomy Sleeping Area and Greater Head Room
    • One Front D Shaped Door/One Vestibule for Gear Storage. Free Standing Design
    • Rain-Shield Polyester Flysheet Doesn't Stretch and Sag When Wet and Resists Damage from UV
    • Lamp Shade Pocket Securely Holds Your Headlamp to Provide Ambient Light
    • Strategic Clip Placement Provides Larger Interior Volume
    • Seam Taped Full Coverage Fly with Vents
    • Seam Taped Catenary Cut Floor
    • Color Coded "Easy Pitch" Clips, Poles and Fly
    • Interior Pockets for Small Gear Organization
    • Jingle-Free Nylon Zipper Pulls
    • DAC Featherlite NSL Poles
    • Optional Footprint Available

     

      View website

      Alpkit Soloist Tent £119.99

      A decent product at an unassailable price, the Soloist will naturally appeal to anyone on a limited budget. While the materials, build quality, and general design do not quite match up to the higher spec models on review, this tent represents superb value for money and will certainly do the job. Why pay more? Well, some more pricey alternatives offer a lot better head room and porch space for a similar weight, and these will be big factors if using your tent for extended periods, or in more challenging spring or autumn conditions. Despite this, the Soloist remains a light option - both in your pack and on your wallet - and it's admirably sturdy in windy weather. The downsides are definitely forgivable for the money.

      The Soloist on a solo trip in darkest Dartmoor  © Dan Bailey
      The Soloist on a solo trip in darkest Dartmoor
      © Dan Bailey

      The Soloist comes in Regular size or XL, which costs £10 more, adds a modest weight increase, and gives you 20cm extra length. For larger users this could be a better option than the standard version we have been looking at.

      Weight and build quality

      While Alpkit's all-in quoted weight for the Regular size is 1200g, I make it slightly more at 1278g. Nevertheless this is still a very respectable weight for a pretty sturdy single person tent with inner and fly, and it's light enough for most discerning backpackers, travellers and bike tourers. It's worth noting though that a separate footprint is provided, and I would advise using it. This weighs 141g, bringing the effective field weight up to 1419g.

      Though the materials and poles don't have quite the same quality feel as higher priced alternatives, the general standard of construction is better than you might assume from the price tag alone, and I'd expect to get a good few years out of this tent.

      Soloist (left) on a midgey evening at Coruisk - I'll soon be thankful for the insect screen door  © Dan Bailey
      Soloist (left) on a midgey evening at Coruisk - I'll soon be thankful for the insect screen door
      © Dan Bailey

      Fabric and poles

      The fly is a 20D ripstop polyester, with a PU backer and a hydrostatic head of 3000mm - plenty waterproof enough, in my experience. While polyester is less prone than nylon to sagging when wet, and withstands UV damage better, nylon is available at a lighter weight, and has a higher tear strength. In use I can't say I've noticed the difference.

      Inside it's a combination of 20D nylon and insect mesh, while the groundsheet is a 20D ripstop polyester with a PU backer and a hydrostatic head of 5000mm. I've not noticed any water seeping up from underneath, even when kneeling and pitched on soggy ground, but the relative thinness of the groundsheet means it's sensible to double up with the footprint that comes supplied in order to help prolong the tent's service life.

      An un-branded aluminium alloy pole is provided, and this is one of the components on which Alpkit must have economised. Since it's thinner and feels spidery and less high spec than the poles on offer in more expensive competitors, I'd be a bit less confident of its storm resistance and ultimate longevity. So far, so good however, and Alpkit's three-year warranty certainly suggests they have confidence in the product overall.

      There's mesh in the roof area and the door, but the rest of the inner is fabric, which makes it less draughty  © Nick Brown
      There's mesh in the roof area and the door, but the rest of the inner is fabric, which makes it less draughty
      © Nick Brown

      Pitching

      With a one-piece pole forming a single roof ridge, dovetailing with a hub at each end to create V-shaped gable ends, this is a free-standing semi-geodesic design along similar lines to the structure of the Hubba NX. The Soloist does not require pegs for the pole structure to remain upright, and only four or five pegs are needed for a basic pitch. The pegs are a simple angled design, with handy cord loops to make extraction easier; however they aren't as strong as more expensive alternatives, and I've managed to slightly bend a couple after only a few nights use. You get 11 pegs as standard with the Soloist, enough for everything including two guylines. Some higher-budget brands could learn from this generosity.

      The inner goes up first, quickly and easily hooking onto the poles. Throw over the fly, and velcro it to the poles at a number of points to help the tent stay neat and well aligned in the wind; adjust the tension with ladder lock buckles at each corner, and the tent is ready in a few minutes. But as with all inner-pitch-first designs, setting it up in heavy rain is a bit of a drawback since the inside may get wet before you've managed to protect it with the fly. And those velcro tabs do add a bit of time and fiddle to the pitch.

      In the standard size of Soloist, the door is like the entrance to a Hobbit hole  © Dan Bailey
      In the standard size of Soloist, the door is like the entrance to a Hobbit hole
      © Dan Bailey

      Three different configurations are possible: standard inner-plus-fly for general use; inner only for warm/dry places; and fly plus footprint for warm but wetter conditions. The latter makes this tent something closer to a tarp in terms of lightness and airy feel. In the UK the chief advantages of a tent over a tarp are that it is less draughty, and more insect proof; I can't see myself ever wanting to set up the Soloist in inner-free mode, but someone somewhere is bound to find use for that option.

      Interior space

      Its limited living room is one of the weak points in the standard size of Soloist, and even with the XL version the basic space issue will remain the same, since it stems from the shape of the tent as much as its overall dimensions.

      At 1.83m tall and reasonably broad, my first issue is simply getting in and out, since the porthole-style inner door is a lot lower than the full height of the tent, at only around 67cm - and narrow with it, at just 60cm wide. Whilst cooking or hanging out at camp I often like to sit in the doorway of a tent with my legs outside, but when using the Soloist I can't do that without hunching uncomfortably. On the plus side the outer door can be unzipped on both sides, and rolled up neatly to give a wide (if not high) opening to the vestibule; and though the inner door has no retaining toggles, it can be stuffed neatly out of the way into a little internal sleeve.

      It has quite a small doorway for larger users  © Nick Brown
      It has quite a small doorway for larger users
      © Nick Brown

      The roofline maximises head height, but it's very tapered  © Dan Bailey
      The roofline maximises head height, but it's very tapered
      © Dan Bailey

      An inner length of 200cm (220cm for XL) sounds like it should be plenty for me, but due to the slope of the gable ends I find my head and feet can nudge up a bit against the fabric when lying straight. Width is pretty decent though, tapering from a generous 95cm at the doorway to 77cm at the foot. This allows plenty of room for both the occupant on a mat, and bits and bobs along the sides.

      It's the headroom, however, that most lets this design down. While the internal height of 95cm seems enough on paper, this is the absolute maximum at the apex of the roof, around mid-tent, and the height drops towards both head and foot. I can just about sit upright in the middle of the tent, but thanks to the single narrow ridge of the roof, and the sloping sides, the walls touch each side of my head. Turn your head and you'll have a faceful of mesh. For average-to-larger users I think the Soloist's liveability is borderline claustrophobic, and this certainly isn't a tent I'd want to spend waking hours inside while sitting (or reclining) out bad weather.

      No storage pockets are provided inside. This is a real pain if, like me, you like them for little essentials such as a torch or a phone. I'd like to say that in terms of storage the porch makes up for it, but it really doesn't. With a very limited floor area, made effectively tighter still by the angled slope of the door panel, there's not a lot of room to play with here, and while you can pile your footwear and an empty rucksack inside for the night, you'll be clambering over them if you're getting out for a pee. Using the porch as a sheltered place to cook is not really on the agenda.

      It's a stable structure that stands up well in the wind  © Dan Bailey
      It's a stable structure that stands up well in the wind
      © Dan Bailey

      Weather performance

      We're back on more solid ground here. With fabric inner walls to help keep out a side breeze and a mesh area only higher up to aid ventilation, the Soloist is less draughty than some competitors. In cold weather this is not one of those tents that feels like a wind tunnel. Vents on the fly are limited, and the outer comes close to the ground all round. There is of course a downside to this in warmer conditions, when the sluggish airflow turns the Soloist into quite a stuffy tent; condensation can become an issue too. In the trade-off between warmth and ventilation there is no one ideal solution, of course, though a vent at the foot end of this tent would have helped control the moisture buildup.

      Front vent props open, and the door can be rolled up reasonably neatly  © Dan Bailey
      Front vent props open, and the door can be rolled up reasonably neatly
      © Dan Bailey

      You won't be storing much, or cooking, in that cramped and sloping porch  © Dan Bailey
      You won't be storing much, or cooking, in that cramped and sloping porch
      © Dan Bailey

      At this weight and price point the Soloist has proved a surprisingly robust tent in windy conditions. Its streamlined end-to-end profile means that it feels reliable if pitched foot into the wind, and thanks to multiple pegging points on the fly and a total of five possible guy points (only two guylines are sold with it) the tent feels really well anchored to the ground. But its large side walls can tend to act as sails if they're accidentally aligned to catch the breeze (or if the wind changes direction overnight), so you do want to bear that in mind when pitching. The hubbed poles create quite a rigid framework, but in gusty conditions it's hard to place quite as much faith in a tent at this price point. Well, perhaps you do get what you pay for.

      Packing

      Tent and separate footprint, with a 1L bottle for scale  © Dan Bailey
      Tent and separate footprint, with a 1L bottle for scale
      © Dan Bailey

      While Alpkit's blurb claims the package is not much larger than a bottle of wine, I'd say we're talking magnums rather than your standard 750ml bottle. The stuff sack is shorter and a bit wider than some. Its squat shape may not strap as readily to the outside of a rucksack, but of course it still packs inside neatly.

      Alpkit say:

      Soloist encapsulates everything we love about just getting out and enjoying wild spaces. It is light and small enough to keep you agile. It is easy to pitch, spacious and stable, providing comfort and security when you need it. Carrying everything yourself you know you have to be super aware of what you put in your pack or strap to your bike. We have used lightweight, packable fabrics and short pole sections to create a package that weighs 1200 grams and isn't much larger than a bottle of wine. Depending on your trip you can strip the tent down to its bare minimum and save yourself another 400 grams.

      • Max weight (excl footprint): 1200g
      • Trail weight (footprint/Fly/Poles): 823g
      • Optional footprint: 128g
      • Outer: 20 d Silicone coated Ripstop Polyester with PU backer (HH: 3,000 mm)
      • Inner: 20 d Nylon Breathable Ripstop
      • Mesh: D33 mesh
      • Floor: 20 d Ripstop Polyester PU (HH: 5,000 mm)
      • Poles: 7001-T6 alloy
      • Pegs: 10 pegs, Alpkit Apex
      • Width: 100cm
      • Internal width: 95cm (widest at front). Tapers to 77cm at back.
      • Length: 270cm
      • Internal Length: 200cm
      • Height: 100cm
      • Internal height: 95cm
      • Packed size: 42 x 14cm
      • Tall enough to sit up in, wide enough to move around in with space for gear
      • Freestanding structure makes it easy to pitch and stable in poor weather
      • Useable porch space for muddy boots, internal stash pockets and hanging loops for organising your gear
      • Twin wall design
      • 3 Year Alpine Bond
      View website

      Macpac Microlight £400

      Having come up with some effective tent designs years ago, notably the 2-person Minaret and the 1-person Microlight, Macpac have  introduced only gradual changes. But are they looking a bit jaded in today's market? The Microlight's single ridge pole structure seems at first glance as if it'll act as a sail in high wind, but in use it proves surprisingly stable, and in fact this sturdy tent has some of the best weather performance of any on review. It's billed as a four-season model, and within reason we'd agree - this would be a good choice if conditions look bracing. Headroom and living space are sacrificed to wind performance, however, while ventilation is a bit lacking for warm weather use. It's a lot heavier than the alternatives on review, but on the other hand it feels tough.

      It's a wind-shedding shape with four sturdy guys, but headroom and porch space are limited  © Dan Bailey
      It's a wind-shedding shape with four sturdy guys, but headroom and porch space are limited
      © Dan Bailey

      Weight and build quality

      At a hefty 1619g the Microlight is a whopper in the weight stakes, which is rather ironic given its name. If counting grams is the prime concern - let's say you're on a long distance backpacking mission, or a mountain marathon type event - then you can probably stop reading now. However, instead of being a whippet-like lightweight that has to be looked after with some care, this chunky little number is very clearly built to last, a tradeoff that may well be worth making if you're looking for a tent that can take hard knocks and abusive weather year in, year out. In my experience Macpac tents are reliably durable, and perhaps that's worth a bit of extra weight.

      Microlight in action in highland Perthshire  © Dan Bailey
      Microlight in action in highland Perthshire
      © Dan Bailey

      Fabric and poles

      The thick fabrics outweigh much of the competition, but will probably outlast them too.

      Outside it's a 30D silicone-coated ripstop Nylon fly. This may not be the lightest material, but it feels tough and has enough body not to snap in the wind. Its 3000mm hydrostatic head doesn't sound like a lot when faced with high wind and torrential rain, but in practise I've found it reliably waterproof in any weather. This tent was designed for New Zealand, and that should be enough for anywhere.

      It's worth noting that the seams on the fly are not factory taped, and have to be manually seam sealed at home, using a tube of SilNet seam sealer (provided). This is really quite a faff, and while some people like tinkering I'd say it's unusual these days to expect the consumer to invest this sort of time and effort on a brand new product. Here's an instruction video from Macpac:

      Underneath is a groundsheet of so-called Torrentwear XP, a 70D Nylon that's durable enough to stand up to years of hard use, negating the need for a separate undersheet (an option some brands make almost obligatory by giving you a super-thin groundsheet). With a hefty 10,000mm hydrostatic head this thing is letting no water in. Added to that, the groundsheet is a high bathtub style for added confidence, and I've camped on squishy Scottish ground with no issue.

      Since there's only one pole you'd have to hope it's a good'un, and Macpac haven't skimped here, with a decent 9.6mm aluminium DAC Featherlite NSL. On my review model, the cording connecting the pole sections arrived already shot and non-elastic, and though I've shortened it considerably it could really do with being replaced. Perhaps this particular tent had sat around in a warehouse for years.

      Pitching

      Fans of a flexible pitch will be in their element here: the Microlight can be put up with just the inner, or solely the fly, should the desire to do either of those strike you (I'll admit I've never wanted either). Because the inner can be clipped to the fly, the whole tent can also be pitched in one go, something I do find a big advantage if it's raining buckets, compared to designs that have to be set up inner-first. I leave the whole lot clipped together all the time, which may be a bit slower to dry after use, but is a winner for convenience.

      With just one pole, and pitching inner and fly at the same time, it goes up fast  © Dan Bailey
      With just one pole, and pitching inner and fly at the same time, it goes up fast
      © Dan Bailey

      But to stand up it relies on secure pegging - not always easy to achieve  © Dan Bailey
      But to stand up it relies on secure pegging - not always easy to achieve
      © Dan Bailey

      Having just a single pole that slides into a sleeve on the fly to create the one hoop of the roof, the Microlight goes up in minutes - though I do find the pole sleeve can be a bit clingy, which makes it slightly less smooth-running than it could be.

      Twelve aluminium pegs are provided, a mix of angled pegs with more holding power and simpler hooks with an old fashioned round cross section; both are sturdy and light, with rounded tops that are a bit easier on the hands than the modern sharp-edged stakes most brands now go in for. Though it's very convenient to assemble, a big disadvantage of this single-pole design is that it depends entirely on pegging to remain upright; if you're on stony ground or soft snow some creativity will be required.

      Without loads of room inside, you may tend to gravitate outdoors when it's dry  © Dan Bailey
      Without loads of room inside, you may tend to gravitate outdoors when it's dry
      © Dan Bailey

      Interior space

      While modern tent designs often manage to build in plenty of headroom to increase comfort and liveability, space is an aspect where the Microlight falls quite far short. For a one-person tent the floor area is pretty generous, at least in terms of width; but its pitched walls and single narrow roof ridge make for very limited headroom. The hoop is low, too, at around 90cm max (Macpac rather optimistically quote a full metre). I am 1.83m, and cannot sit fully upright at the apex of the Microlight; if I move to either side I'm immediately up against the sloping walls with a face full of fabric - not helped by the fact that the inner is quite saggy. The external entrance is a lot lower than the full internal height, making it a bit hunched when sat half out of the doorway.

      Average-to-tall users will find it a bit hunched  © Dan Bailey
      Average-to-tall users will find it a bit hunched
      © Dan Bailey

      The pitch of the walls limits headroom  © Dan Bailey
      The pitch of the walls limits headroom
      © Dan Bailey

      You get about 215cm of length (Macpac say 220), but thanks to the sloping walls that's only just sufficient for my 1.83cm frame, and taller users might struggle to lie flat out without head and feet pushing up against the walls and potentially getting damp. Width is a decent 112cm at one end (Macpac say 130), which is enough to store bits and bobs along the side of your mat, but it tapers to a less accommodating 65cm or so at the other, so you're likely to use the Microlight only one way round. I am over average adult male size, but not massive, and for me it is borderline claustrophobic. If you're out for more than a night or two, this would be a model best suited to smaller users.

      Some designs offer a couple of pockets on the inner, but here you get only one, albeit a decent size for things like a torch. 

      The door can be pinned right open...  © Dan Bailey
      The door can be pinned right open...
      © Dan Bailey

      ...to give you a panoramic view, and lots of air  © Dan Bailey
      ...to give you a panoramic view, and lots of air
      © Dan Bailey

      There's plenty of ground in the porch, so storage for boots and pack is sufficient, but again that sloping flysheet limits vertical space for cooking in bad weather. And since the doorway doesn't open to the full height of the roof, I'm quite hunched when sat half in and half out of the tent (something it's nice to do when cooking, for instance).

      If you've pegged out the fly at the middle point on the entry side, the door opening isn't big, and when unzipped there's no obvious way to secure the open bit of the door flap, which just drapes limply. I find this a bit annoying, especially when the fly is wet. In nice weather though, the entire side of the tent can be rolled back to give you a much wider doorway, an airy and open feel which I like when avoiding rain or midges isn't a concern.

      It inspires confidence if you're camped in an exposed spot  © Dan Bailey
      It inspires confidence if you're camped in an exposed spot
      © Dan Bailey

      Weather performance

      Intuitively, a single-pole design should be less wind resistant than a tent with a pair of crossed or hubbed poles, but the Microlight defies this assumption, and once securely pitched it really is stable. Sturdy materials contribute to the generally robust feel, while its squat spread-out shape hugs the ground like a limpet. The four guylines help the tent withstand the weather, and thanks to the streamlined angles I've found that within reason it can be pitched even broadside to the wind without turning into a sail. With a taut, angled fly there's very little to flap or catch the breeze, and the outer comes low to the ground too, to keep out draughts, snow and wind-blown rain. Overall this is a very confidence inspiring design in hostile conditions.

      For full winter conditions, this is one of the most solid models on review  © Dan Bailey
      For full winter conditions, this is one of the most solid models on review
      © Dan Bailey

      With no exposed mesh panels on the inner, the Microlight is a very warm tent, which makes it appreciably more snug for use in cold or windy conditions compared to the draughtiness of a more open inner. This is very definitely the warmest tent on review, but as well as being a strength in winter, this can clearly be a drawback at other times of year. Macpac have built some ventilation into the fly, and they give you a zip-open mesh area on some of the inner door flap, but these are not enough to offer much airflow, so during milder weather it soon gets stuffy if you're in there with the outer door closed. In wet but warm conditions I'll often leave the top of my outer door unzipped a bit to add some extra ventilation, but the lack of a two-way zip on this particular tent means that's not an option here.

      In humid weather the ventilation can feel limited   © Dan Bailey
      In humid weather the ventilation can feel limited
      © Dan Bailey

      With limited air circulation, condensation is unavoidable, and in the Microlight it can get pretty bad. While the separation of the inner tent from the fly is enough to spare you the worst of the wetness, everything does tend to feel a bit dank in the morning, and if camped for several days in humid conditions, or indeed in winter cold, I can imagine the buildup of moisture getting worse.

      Thanks to the stuffiness I'm tempted to call the Microlight a 3-season model, but in this case its optimum seasons are the cold ones. For regular summer use this design is not optimal.

      The stuff sack is sized generously to make packing easy, and we like the compression straps   © Dan Bailey
      The stuff sack is sized generously to make packing easy, and we like the compression straps
      © Dan Bailey

      Packing

      Since it's so simple, the Microlight goes down as readily as it erects. Its stuff sack is one of the better designs on review, with enough space to get everything in without having to cram it, and an effective pair of compression straps. Given its weight, the packed size is surprisingly modest.

      Macpac say:

      Ideal for solo adventurers, the four-season Microlight Hiking Tent is engineered to minimise weight, maximise durability and provide aerodynamic stability in high winds. Effectively shedding snow in alpine environments, the Microlight has a single ridge pole, Multi-Pitch™ design. The Multi-Pitch™ system offers ultimate versatility, allowing you to pitch the fly and inner together or separately — or alternatively, you can pitch the fly and inner at the same time while still connected. The waterproof UV30™ SI fly is made from a silicone-coated nylon fabric known for its strength, water resistance and UV protection. It has a 3,000 mm hydrostatic head. Please note, this fly needs to be manually seam sealed with the provided SilNet™ seam sealer. A Torrentwear™ XP tub floor design is both waterproof and durable, keeping the water out and removing the need for a separate footprint. One DAC Featherlite NSL pole is included — these poles are developed through DAC's 'green anodizing' process which helps to minimise toxic chemicals in the production process, which is better for workers and the environment. A single vestibule provides space for cooking and some gear storage, while the double door, internal mesh and four vent system improves airflow in warmer climates. The best choice for solo adventurers wishing to comfortably camp in alpine conditions, the durable Microlight is warmer (and slightly heavier) than the Sololight Hiking Tent by comparison.

      • Max weight: 1600g
      • Outer fabric: UV30™ SI 100% Nylon Ripstop, 30D with Silicone coating, 3000mm hydrostatic head
      • Inner fabric: 100% Nylon Ripstop (40D)
      • Floor Fabric: Torrentwear™ XP 100% Nylon (70D/210T with PU coating), 10,000mm Hydrostatic Head
      • Pole Type: DAC Featherlite NSL 9.6 mm
      • Pitching System: Multi-Pitch™
      • Length: 2.2m
      • Width: 1.3m
      • Height: 1m
      • Floor Area (m2)2.1
      • Vestibule Size: 1.2 m sq
      • Packed size: 41 x 14cm
      • Waterproof 'tub floor' design to eliminate need for separate footprint
      • One DAC Featherlite NSL pole for strength and stability — green anodised to help minimise toxic chemicals in production process
      • Internal mesh and large double-door system for improved airflow
      • Single vestibule for cooking and gear storage
      • Internal mesh pockets for organised living
      View website

      Samaya 2.0 £1050

      In the context of this review the Samaya2.0 is a left-field choice, a mountaineering specialist among the more generalist competition. Its price is bound to raise eyebrows - and this is the entry level option in Samaya's range! - but the combination of funky design and high-end materials makes this an exemplar of the tent-maker's art, and this sort of refinement simply doesn't come cheap. Its alpine capability is more than most users will need (or wish to pay for) but if you're in the market for a single skin bivvy tent for high altitude objectives then the Samaya 2.0 will be well worth a look. There's nothing stopping you using it to good effect closer to home too, for backpacking as well as mountaineering (we have), and while its lack of porch and dearth of insect mesh take a bit of working around, the performance in foul weather is very reassuring. While this is primarily intended as a two-person model it would be a tight fit with all your gear, while on the other hand it's palatial for one.

      It's not quite the alps, but the Samaya 2.0 is well up for summit camps in the UK too  © Dan Bailey
      It's not quite the alps, but the Samaya 2.0 is well up for summit camps in the UK too
      © Dan Bailey

      We can't say this is an all-rounder, or anything remotely resembling a mass market model, but in its specialised (and moneyed) niche the Samaya2.0 is the business; since we're suckers for highly functional gear, how could we not award it Highly Recommended? 

      Weight and build quality

      The total weight of 1341g is a tad more than some of the double skin tents on review here, and a lot higher than the hyperlight backpacking specialists we've not looked at, but remember this is a larger tent than most, and officially for two people. Split between two rucksacks, it'd be a very manageable load. Even treated as a large solo shelter the Samaya2.0 could hardly be considered heavy when you bear in mind its robustness, and I certainly haven't begrudged carrying it up hills myself.

      At over £1000 you'd be entitled to expect a high-end finish - and with almost a hand-crafted feel, the Samaya2.0 doesn't disappoint. Every detail is perfect, and it's very clearly built to withstand the rigours of high mountain use.  There's a 2-year warranty (though note that at the opposite end of the price spectrum, Alpkit can manage 3 years).

      If you want views or ventilation, open the window  © Dan Bailey
      If you want views or ventilation, open the window
      © Dan Bailey

      Fabric 

      Their high performance fabrics are one of the first things you'll probably notice about Samaya tents, and the fact that no expense is spared on the materials is of course reflected in the price tag.

      On the Samaya2.0 the floor is made of Dyneema Composite Fabric. A strangely crinkly material that looks at first glance like crumpled tissue paper, it is in fact extremely durable for its very low weight of just 34g/m². Sometimes called the world's strongest fibre (I've no idea if that's true), Dyneema is said to be 15 times stronger than steel, weight for weight. Climbers will obviously have encountered its use in slings, but this is the first time I can recall seeing Dyneema in a tent. More abrasion and cut-resistant than nylon, and not prone to soaking up water, it seems a good choice for a groundsheet. With its high bathtub sides, and a hefty 20,000mm hydrostatic head, no water is getting through this groundsheet, and you'll be able to pitch on snow or boggy ground with confidence.

      Quick to pitch...  © Dan Bailey
      Quick to pitch...
      © Dan Bailey

      ...and to dismantle  © Dan Bailey
      ...and to dismantle
      © Dan Bailey

      This is not a cheap tent (to state the obvious, again), so on stony ground, and despite its toughness, you may want to protect the groundsheet from unnecessary damage by using a footprint. Samaya asked us to do so with their review sample, and this sheet adds a further 150g to the overall tent weight. Made of 30D high tenacity Nylon 6.6, the Footprint 2.0 costs (wait for it...) £90.

      Condensation management is key to the success of single skin tent designs, so it's more or less essential to make the upper from a breathable fabric. Here Samaya have used a 3-layer laminated 'Nanovent' membrane, which is air permeable, and also boasts a Moisture Vapour Transmission Rate of a whopping 40,000 g/m²/24h. To put that lab-based figure for breathability into context, we've reviewed perfectly decent winter mountain shell jackets with half that MVTR. 

      Even after a night zipped in, the walls are surprisingly dry to the touch  © Dan Bailey
      Even after a night zipped in, the walls are surprisingly dry to the touch
      © Dan Bailey

      Typically, the breathable fabrics used in single skin tents have been adapted from those used in clothing, but Samaya say they developed their electrospun nano-porous membrane specifically for use in tents. It clearly works well, and so far I've been surprised at the almost total lack of moisture on the inside after sleeping in a range of weather conditions, from dry and breezy to relatively humid and rainy. The fabric really seems to work as promised. We haven't had a chance to test it in cold weather, though.

      The air permeability of the fabric ensures that even with all zips done right up, there's still some fresh air, and I've noticed not feeling as stuffy as I might have expected. This upper also seems sufficiently strong for its weight, and thanks to the taut structure it doesn't snap, crackle or pop in the wind. With its 10,000mm hydrostatic head, waterproofing is no issue.  

      Like the Samaya2.5, the Samaya2.0 is available in either blue or the pastel pink pictured here. The latter is bound to appeal to someone, though I think it's a weird colour for a tent (or, really, anything).

      The plastic pegs are interesting - good holding power, but perhaps not as strong as aluminium  © Dan Bailey
      The plastic pegs are interesting - good holding power, but perhaps not as strong as aluminium
      © Dan Bailey

      Pitching

      Three chunky and robust 8.7mm DAC FeatherLite NFL aluminium poles provide the backbone, and they ought to take plenty of abuse. The basic crossed pole structure will be familiar to anyone who's used similar single skin dome-style bivvy tents, though here Samaya have added a third short cross-section to broaden the roof and increase headroom inside. The pole sleeves are external, which is marginally less fiddly than single skin designs that are erected from the inside, and the pole tips are colour coded for ease of use (there's a rounded end and a pointier end).

      Odd-looking flat-topped plastic pegs are supplied, four of 9cm and 5 of 12cm. Made by a company called Swiss Piranha, these can be pushed in by hand, and don't lurk in the grass waiting to lacerate a bare foot. Fully recyclable, they take much less energy to produce than aluminium, it's said, and when bent they can apparently be straightened after heating (I do think they're more prone to bending than a decent angled aluminium stake). They're really light, too, and the holding power in soil is excellent - though I doubt the pegs supplied with the Samaya2.0 are big enough to be much cop in snow, and I've struggled to force them into compact rooty soil. You can buy them online direct from the manufacturer.

      I've tended to pin out the four tips of the tent and the rear guyline using the bigger pegs, leaving me the shorter ones for the four guylines at the corners. All told, it takes just a few minutes to pitch the Samaya2.0 - less time than most double skin tents, since you don't have to fiddle with a fly. 

      The huge doorway brings the outside in... but there's no porch for cooking or storage  © Dan Bailey
      The huge doorway brings the outside in... but there's no porch for cooking or storage
      © Dan Bailey

      Interior space

      On the outside it may be not much larger than the other tents on review, but with only one layer there's no volume lost inside. If used, as primarily intended, as a two-person tent, then it's going to feel crowded once you've added mats and equipment. While living in each other's breathing space is all very well on Alpine climbing trips, where - let's face it - you're already sacrificing bodily comfort to keep weight down, the Samaya2.0 isn't really big enough to be classed as a conventional two-person tent for less extreme use. It is also suggested as a palatial shelter for one person, and that's something I can really get on board with.

      In the product info the floor dimensions are down at 220 x 110cm, while I make it slightly less at 215 x 105cm; either way, that's a lot of room for one person, a mat, and their gear, but very tight for two. Once you're raised on a mat, the effective length is reduced, of course, and at 1.83m I can just about stretch out without touching the ends. Headroom really is generous. With a peak height of just under 1m (by my measure), and a broad roof and steep side walls that give you decent height across much of the interior, even pretty big users will be able to sit upright in comfort. 

      It'd be cosy for two, but its palatial for one  © Dan Bailey
      It'd be cosy for two, but its palatial for one
      © Dan Bailey

      There's enough headroom for me (1.83m) to sit up  © Dan Bailey
      There's enough headroom for me (1.83m) to sit up
      © Dan Bailey

      Keeping your bits and bobs organised inside is easy, thanks to a massive mesh pocket that runs the length of the back wall. Add to this a little clip-in gear loft in the ceiling, which is a nice place to stick a torch to illuminate your den. External gear storage, however, is non existent. As with most single skin designs, the Samaya 2.0 has no inbuilt porch, so you will be forced to share the interior with your pack and boots, or contrive a way to keep them dry outside. Worse, for wet or windy weather, is that there's no sheltered cooking area other than the living space; and while I know mountaineers habitually fire up the stove inside their tent, this is not something that should be high on most user's to-do list, for obvious reasons. For camping in the hills in all weathers and seasons, the lack of a porch is one of this tent's major disadvantages, undermining its potential as an all-rounder.

      It's worth noting that a separate vestibule is available, and likely to be something you'd appreciate for extended use between two people plus kit. But it will of course add weight, and furthermore it costs more than many tents in its own right: Vestibule 2.0 in nylon is £250, while the Dyneema version will set you back a staggering £450. A considered purchase, then.

      Up top are two zipped vent flaps, and a little mesh 'shelf' for a torch etc  © Dan Bailey
      Up top are two zipped vent flaps, and a little mesh 'shelf' for a torch etc
      © Dan Bailey

      Back on the credit side of the calculation, the massive doorway opens the entire long side of the tent to offer easy access and egress, even if there are two of you clambering over each other. In the opposite wall is a wide window flap. With both window and door unzipped, the tent becomes an airy alpine gazebo, a great place to hang out and enjoy the surroundings when the weather's conducive. And when things are less friendly outside, it's reassuring to note that all zips on the tent are water resistant. 

      Weather performance

      Of course in the mountains the weather is often far from friendly; but you could confidently ride out some hostile conditions in the Samaya2.0. Once pegged, guyed and tensioned, this is a really sturdy and rigid shelter, especially if you've pitched end into the wind - but you do have to use every guyline to get a proper taut pitch all round.

      Both structurally, and in terms of materials, it's very clearly built to withstand the rigourous conditions of winter or high altitude. So how does it fare in more temperate, not to say temperamental, climes? Dry cold is one thing, but what about rain, ming and midges? Here's where the specialised Alpine bivvy tent is at something of a disadvantage. Breathability and waterproofness can't be faulted, so the stuff it's made of certainly works well in a variety of conditions, not just sub-zero high mountains. It's the compromises made by the design itself that count against everyday use in less extreme places. 

      The cross-piece adds rigidity; the cowl keeps weather out of the top vents  © Dan Bailey
      The cross-piece adds rigidity; the cowl keeps weather out of the top vents
      © Dan Bailey

      Plenty of guylines for stability in windy conditions  © Dan Bailey
      Plenty of guylines for stability in windy conditions
      © Dan Bailey

      Again, I've got to go back to the lack of porch. Yes there's a little Dyneema cowl over the top of the door, which must keep out at least some of the elements if the zip is undone a fraction and precipitation isn't blowing horizontally; but that's your lot. With no vestibule to create a protective screen, in rainy weather you have to zip right up.

      Midges might not feature high on the list of Alpine objective dangers, but we all know the misery they can make of any summer camp in the UK's hills - and other northern lattitudes have similar delights. Any tent for year-round use up here really needs insect mesh, but thanks to an entirely alpine-focused feature set, the window and door have none. They're either open, or they're closed; and as with rainy weather, if the midges strike then your only option is to zip tight and ride it out in a claustrophobic half light.

      To help get some air in when the main openings are closed, you do get two small triangular zipped flaps up top; these are the sole openings on the tent to feature mesh. Protected by a large clip-on waterproof Dyneema hood (which I would leave attached all the time), these vents are usable even in the rain.

      It doesn't pack as tight as some, and you need to keep the poles separate, but then it's a bigger tent   © Dan Bailey
      It doesn't pack as tight as some, and you need to keep the poles separate, but then it's a bigger tent
      © Dan Bailey

      Packing

      When zipped up, it's effectively a sealed bag, so you have to remember to leave the door slightly open to squeeze the air out as you stuff it away. It's a tight fit. Packing it all is a bit of a fiddle, since there's no single bag large enough to hold everything. This would be handy when distributing the load between you and your partner, but less so when you find someone has forgotten the poles. I'd have liked a conventional tent bag large enough to take it all.

      To save overall weight, and because it's cool, the drybag-style stuff sack, pole sleeve, and peg bags are all made from the same Dyneema Composite Fabric as the groundsheet. It's that sort of attention to detail that explains both the Samaya2.0's attraction, and its price.

      Samaya say:

      The Samaya2.0 is the ultimate multipurpose tool. Developed to meet the needs and requirements of mountaineers, the Nanovent®️ membrane allows this 4-season tent to be the perfect partner for both your high mountain ascents, your treks and your touring trips.

      Designed for 2 people, the Samaya2.0 is the smallest model of the ALPINE range. Its rectangular-shaped Dyneema®️ composite floor also makes the Samaya2.0 an ideal partner for a single occupant looking for unmatched comfort.

      Samaya 2.0  © Samaya
      Samaya 2.0
      © Samaya

      • Capacity: 2 persons
      • Packed weight: 1280g
      • Seasons: 4
      • Floor fabric: Dyneema® Composite Fabric 34g/m²
      • Floor waterproofness: 20,000mm
      • Wall fabric: 3-layer laminated fabric - Nanovent® membrane
      • Wall waterproofness: 10,000 mm
      • Breathability: 40,000 g/m²/24h
      • Removable roof fabric: Dyneema® Composite Fabric 18 g/m²
      • Window: Adjustable water-repellent Aquaguard® YKK® zip and Dyneema® flap
      • Air vents: Adjustable water-repellent YKK® zip
      • Entrance door: Adjustable water-repellent Aquaguard® YKK® zip and Dyneema® flap
      • Floor corners: Cordura® and Dyneema® reinforcement
      • Seams: 100% waterproof
      • Guy lines: Dyneema® core, adjustable and reflective (x5)
      • Pockets: One on a wall and one removable on the ceiling
      View website

      Black Diamond Distance Tent with Z Poles £400

      Reviewed by TobyA


      And now for something completely different. A very light single skin shelter, the Distance Tent sits somewhere between a minimalist tarp and a conventional tent, offering more weather (and insect) protection than the former, but weighing significantly less than all but the absolute ultralight specialist tents. While officially a 2-person model, and bigger than the double walled tents on review here, we think it's best used solo. Its USP is that the Distance Tent has no frame of its own, and can only be pitched using a pair of trekking poles. This effectively limits its use to backpacking and hillwalking when you're carrying poles anyway (and can thus save weight), and rules out activities such as cycle touring or kayaking. It's undeniably a niche product, but this quirky offering will definitely have its fans.

      Going light in the North Pennines with the Distance Tent and Z-Poles  © Toby Archer
      Going light in the North Pennines with the Distance Tent and Z-Poles
      © Toby Archer

      • Read Toby Archer's full review of the Distance Tent here:

      Weight and build quality

      The Distance Tent is a very lightweight single skin shelter, weighing only around 820g. For the size on offer this is impressively light, being significantly less than any other tent on review, and indeed all but one of the bivvys. However this headline figure is potentially a bit hard to pin down, for the simple reason that it only covers the fabric and does not include walking poles, a pair of which is essential to hold the tent up in place of any dedicated pole structure. Adding another 400g or so for the poles puts it into a similar ballpark to our other tents. However the advantage of poles if you're carrying them anyway is that their weight is already accounted for.

      It feels well made, and so far we've not managed to do any damage.

      Fabric and poles

      The high tenacity 30D polyester fabric used throughout is tough stuff for its weight, and the advantage of polyester over nylon is that it won't stretch when wet. It's not breathable, though.

      The model we've reviewed comes with Black Diamond's Distance Carbon FLZ-AR Trekking Poles. These are a great set of lightweight carbon fibre poles in their own right (weight 380g), which I looked at in the stand-alone review (see above), but they add considerably to the overall cost. The much cheaper alternative version of the tent, the Distance Tent with Adapter (£240), has an identical body but doesn't come with poles.

      Crossbar slots into the poles to make the roof ridge  © Toby Archer
      Crossbar slots into the poles to make the roof ridge
      © Toby Archer

      Pitching

      A well pitched tarp can provide adequate protection in poor weather, but they can be fiddly and take practice to pitch well; in contrast the Distance Tent is really quick and easy to assemble, which means you are out of the weather comparatively quickly.

      In the manner of a lightweight tarp, the canopy hangs from a structure formed by a pair of walking poles. The Distance Carbon FLZ-AR Trekking Poles have a little cover on the top of the handle which pops out to reveal a hole, into which you fit a crossbar piece. Plastic clips on the tent body hook onto this arch, to hold the tent up, and you then adjust the pole length until the fabric is taut. If you already own poles and instead just go for the Distance Tent with Adapter, then there's a slightly larger crossbar, which has sockets with velcro straps that can incorporate any suitable trekking poles (but not all makes and models, so check that it works with yours!). Beyond the different versions of the crossbar, the two Distance Tents are the same.

      Since there's only one central pole, you have to peg out each end to make it stand. Six lightweight V-stakes are provided. These seem strong and resistant to pulling out, but I found removing them quite hard, so added short tie offs to the holes in them with some yellow cord. This gives you something to grip to pull them out and helps find the pegs in tufty grass or heather! There is one additional point to attach a guyline at the foot end. I did this, so added one extra peg for that to the six that came with the tent.

      Good headroom, but it's a bit tight for two people widthwise  © Toby Archer
      Good headroom, but it's a bit tight for two people widthwise
      © Toby Archer

      In wet weather you have to stay zipped up, or rain gets straight in  © Toby Archer
      In wet weather you have to stay zipped up, or rain gets straight in
      © Toby Archer

      Interior space

      Though officially a two-person tent, and therefore more roomy than most alternatives on review here, we still think it is better regarded as a spacious solo shelter. You could fit two people in there - it's 104cm at its narrowest point, enough for two sleeping mats side by side (and wider in the middle) - but two people would be squashing against the sloping side walls where condensation collects (see below). Mountain marathoners may be used to that sort of thing, but the rest of us will prefer to go solo.

      On my own I can sit up with plenty of headroom, and that should be the case with users up to around 6 feet. Its full length is quoted as 241cm but of course not all of that length is liveable inside. When stretched out, I find that only the very ends of my sleeping bag sometimes touch the tent body (the thicker the mat you use the more likely this is, as it raises you off the ground). At the foot end there are two little permanently sewn-in poles about 15cm long, which hold the end of the tent up, allowing the low vent to remain open and minimising the end of your sleeping bag touching the otherwise sloping tent roof.

      It's quick to reposition if rain's getting in the vents  © Toby Archer
      Two drawbacks are the lack of porch, and a vent that's susceptible to driven rain

      But here's a drawback: because the tent has no porch or any other covered area, you have to share your living space with boots and packs, things you wouldn't normally have in the inner of a normal two layer tent. I guess you could leave your boots outside turned upside down or have a carrier bag to put them in outside, but neither of those options give them a chance to dry. I'm not super keen on having muddy boots in the tent with me, I just haven't settled on another solution yet. The same is true for the pack and waterproofs if it has been raining.

      Another issue with no porch or vestibule is that you need to cook outside the tent. This is fine in decent weather, in fact you can sit in your sleeping bag on your mat and make your morning porridge just outside the tent whilst you remain comfortable in it. But the door is on one of the sloping sides, so if it's raining, the rain actually falls into the tent as the bottom of the door is further out than the top. Cooking outside is therefore a bit miserable in rain. Having wind protection for your stove is also important because, again, with no vestibule your stove has no shelter from the wind.

      Back inside, the mosquito netting at the high point has been cleverly folded, forming a pocket in which you can put your torch to illuminate the inside of the tent. There is one other pocket attached to the sidewall of the tent.

      Weather performance

      The tent has one large zip opening door on one side, with a zip-close mosquito net window in it. The zip on the door is protected by a serious storm flap that seems to stop even wind-driven rain from entering.

      Wind-blown rain getting in under the cowl  © Toby Archer
      Wind-blown rain getting in under the cowl
      © Toby Archer

      However, depending on wind direction, rain can find its way into the large open vent at the top of the tent, which is protected by a cowl, but only rain-proof if the precipitation is falling vertically (when does it do that, in the UK hills?). In rainy weather I've found that you have to be careful not to pitch so that the vent is aligned fully into the wind. However, if it's oriented entirely away from the wind direction then air flow through the tent is limited, and you soon hit the big problem common to all single skin tents and bivvys - condensation.

      There is no getting away from it, condensation has been there in the morning on most nights I have used the Distance Tent, unless I've been lucky and managed to face the vent into the wind, and it's remained dry all night. However I've found that by angling the side of the tent with the vent on it at about 45 degrees to wind, I can still get some air flow through to limit condensation, but the cowl can keep the rain out.

      The other vent beside the ones at the apex and foot of tent is the "window" on the door. This is covered in netting so you can have it open during the night for extra ventilation and not get midged, but because of the sloping angle of the side of the tent, again, if it rains it will come through that netting, so you have to zip up the waterproof part again, thus losing that ventilation.

      So condensation is definitely an issue, and storing wet gear inside only adds to it. I've definitely noticed water droplets on my sleeping bag in the morning, probably drips from the walls where either the bag has touched a wall when I've moved or possibly shaken free by wind buffeting the tent. In damp British conditions I'm not sure the Distance Tent would be my choice for multi-day trips, or at the very least you need to be well aware of its limitations and have good gear management skills to work around them. The fabric can also be loud and flappy in high wind. These weather-related niggles are more obviously cons in wet and windy Britain than the more-often-dry US conditions for which it was presumably designed.

      Lighter than most double walled tents, more protective than a tarp or bivvy... the best of both worlds?  © Toby Archer
      Lighter than most double walled tents, more protective than a tarp or bivvy... the best of both worlds?
      © Toby Archer

      Packing

      Take it down, shake off any water and stuff it in its bag, and the package is not much bigger than a litre water bottle. Though it feels like a tent, you are putting something much more like the size and weight of a tarp in your pack. I doubt the Distance Tent is much bigger or any heavier than my old bivvy bag, yet the amount of protection and comfort it gives is huge in comparison.

      Black Diamond say:

      A compact two-person, three-season tent, the Black Diamond Distance Tent is an ultralight, single-wall shelter built for weight conscious backpackers, thru-hikers and mountain adventurers. The structure is created using two Distance Carbon FLZ-AR Trekking Poles (Accessory Ready) trekking Z-Poles and a small DAC cross pole that inserts into the accessory ready grip and connects the trekking poles. Four stake-out points anchor the tent to create the ultimate fast pitch shelter—simple to set up and robust in windy conditions. For cross ventilation, there are vents at both the peak and foot area. Lightweight 30d polyester construction allows the tent to pack down to the size of a Nalgene bottle. There is a headlamp pocket located in the peak for easy illumination.

      • Average Packed Weight: 820g (tent) + 380g (trekking poles)
      • Comes with two Distance Carbon FLZ-AR Trekking Poles
      • Vents at peak and foot allow for cross ventilation
      • Mesh door provides additional ventilation
      • Headlamp pocket in peak for easy illumination
      • Tension-adjustable stake-out points
      • Stronger reflective guylines—Polyester sheath with Dyneema core to minimize stretch
      • High tenacity 30D poly fabric improves strength and doesn't stretch when wet
      • Season: 3
      • Capacity: 2
      • Doors: 1
      • Dimensions: 147 x 241 x 104cm
      • Area: 2.4m2
      • Packed Size : 13 x 30cm
      View website

      Alpkit Elan Bivvy £99.99

      Offering reasonable living space and weather protection for under one kilo, the Elan is both sturdy and user-friendly. With a free-standing tent-like canopy, this unusual design offers something a little different from a typical hooped bivvy. Headroom could be better, as might condensation management, but the Elan is a great buy at this price.

      Settling down for a night in the Mamores with the Elan  © Dan Bailey
      Settling down for a night in the Mamores with the Elan
      © Dan Bailey

      Weight and build quality

      Lightness should be one of the advantages of a bivvy bag, and while it's heavier than some ultralight hooped bivvys and even snazzy sub-kilo tents, the Elan certainly doesn't seem overweight at 938g all-in, given what you get. For backpacking and big hill rounds it's a very manageable weight.

      At this budget it wouldn't be reasonable to expect premium build quality or materials, but while the general feel is a notch down from that I've been pleasantly surprised by how good it still is. Materials feel tough, all the stitching is strong and precise, and overall this isn't a bivvy bag that needs to be handled delicately.

      Fabric and poles

      On top you get a 70D ripstop nylon, which may arguably be thicker than you strictly need but is certainly robust. In terms of waterproofness this has a hydrostatic head of 10,000mm. That's actually a lot more on paper than the flysheets of many tents, but perhaps you need it on the fabric that's going to be in direct contact with your sleeping bag rather than stretched in a canopy far overhead.

      Since this is a bivvy it also has to be breathable, of course, and in this regard the Elan seems reasonably good, if perhaps not stellar. On one cool night with a heavy dew and a light breeze, I found that by morning my sleeping bag and mat were damp (OK, let's say wet) with condensation. Despite its pretty respectable 6500mm Moisture Vapour Transmission Rate (respectable for a bivvy, that is, in which you're not moving around), I'm not convinced that the fabric is sufficiently breathable in all conditions. Condensation is a feature of most bivvy bags, and since that is the nature of the beast I wouldn't hold it against the Elan in particular.

      A heavy dew morning, and there's been a lot of condensation inside the bag too  © Dan Bailey
      A heavy dew morning, and there's been a lot of condensation inside the bag too
      © Dan Bailey

      At ground level it's 70D ripstop nylon again, but here with only a 5000mm hydrostatic head. Intuitively this seems the wrong way round, since the pressure of your body on the groundsheet would suggest something more waterproof is needed underneath than on the fly. I don't get Alpkit's logic, but since the groundsheet has so far proved waterproof enough in use it's academic.

      The two pre-bent 7.9mm 7001 alloy poles may not match the quality of premium branded components, but given the limited forces these short lengths are subject to I've no doubt they're strong enough for long-term use.

      Putting it up takes a couple of minutes, max  © Dan Bailey
      Putting it up takes a couple of minutes, max
      © Dan Bailey

      Pitching

      Setting up is quick and easy, albeit slightly more involved than a traditional single pole design (we're talking extra seconds, not minutes). Sliding into sleeves on the outside of the bag, the two poles cross over on each side to give you what basically amounts to a tiny dome tent at the head end, rather than a single hoop. Unlike a traditional hooped bivvy, this canopy is free-standing without being pegged out, though it's worth adding pegs anyway to stop it all blowing away, and to hold open a small flap that protects a mesh vent at the head end from rain.

      Seven of Alpkit's nice Y-beam angled aluminium pegs are provided, enough to fully pin out the head, and two sewn loops at the foot. These pegs come with cord loops for easier extraction, which isn't something that can be said for some of the premium tents on review.

      For a bivvy, it's quite roomy  © Dan Bailey
      For a bivvy, it's quite roomy
      © Dan Bailey

      Interior space

      At about 220cm, this is a long bivvy bag, which will be good news for the taller user; at 1.83m I can lie right out with some to spare. There's plenty of shoulder room too, tapering from about 75cm at the top end to around 70cm at the toe. There's some height in the toe, but if that end is tightly pegged down I've found foot room becomes limited (though not everyone has feet as big as mine). Overall the inside space is pretty good, and there's room to roll over without feeling restricted.

      If we're being picky, however, I do think the overhead canopy could have been taller, at around 38cm at the max (Alpkit's claimed 45cm seems an overestimate). Even a few centimetres more height would have made it feel less claustrophobic, and since this mini tent is one of the Elan's key selling points it's a shame that I've found it a bit in-your-face.

      Good news for bigger and inflexible folk is that unlike top-entry bivvys, which you have to slide your way into like a worm, the wide-opening side zip on the Elan makes getting in less of a yoga move.

      The head end is a robust 'mini tent' that pegs down at five points, and stands firm in the wind  © Dan Bailey
      The head end is a robust 'mini tent' that pegs down at five points, and stands firm in the wind
      © Dan Bailey

      While you won't be sharing the Elan with footwear or or rucksack, you can stash a few bits of clothing and the like around the head end. To help keep smaller essentials organised, Alpkit have also included neat little pockets at the top; it took me some time to discover these, but they're really useful.

      Weather performance

      If you're lying out in what basically amounts to a plastic bag then you're less protected from the weather than you would be in a tent, so when bivvying it's often a good idea to seek some natural shelter. Thanks to the wafting of the fabric and the movement of air inside you may be colder than in a tent, and with rain drumming on the bag you'll certainly feel more exposed to the elements. In the Elan, though, that rigid canopy stands up really well to wind, and actually buffets around less than many full sized tents, so you'll be able to take a fair bit of weather in your stride. I like the feeling of protection around the head.

      Keeping rain out of the bag without suffocating is one of the challenges of bivvying, and while the Elan's head-end canopy doesn't have much overhang to help in this regard, it's possible to zip right up without expiring, thanks to the presence of a netting-covered vent at the head end. This is protected by a long flap that should keep out all but the most determined driven rain. However, while it provides plenty of ventilation - in warm conditions it's really pleasant having a breeze direct on your face - the fact that the vent cannot be closed makes the Elan quite draughty in windy or cold weather. This does depend to an extent what direction the wind is coming from relative to your pitch; if the weather changes direction overnight then at least a bivvy bag is quick to re-align compared with a tent.

      I've said I like the entry on the Elan, but it's worth noting that it's not a waterproof zip, and since there are no bathtub-style sides in the groundsheet the position of the zip along the ground line would be likely to expose it to leaks in a downpour. One last thing worth mentioning is the zip-in bug screen, a Scottish bivvying sanity essential.

      When packed it's fairly small, but not as compact as the OR Helium Bivy  © Dan Bailey
      When packed it's fairly small, but not as compact as the OR Helium Bivy
      © Dan Bailey

      Packing

      As with all bivvy bags, packing it away without creating a big inflated balloon requires you to start at the foot end; and even then, the stuff sack is quite small, making it a bit of an effort to cram the Elan in. A marginally more generous bag would have been good (especially when everything's wet and you have cold hands). Still, it does all make quite a compact bundle that's easily stashed in a backpack for lightweight bivvying.

      Alpkit say:

      Elan  © Alpkit
      Elan
      © Alpkit

      The Elan is a light and packable waterproof shelter, ideal for multi-day backpacking and bikepacking trips when you can't outrun the weather forever.

      The head canopy offers much more relative comfort than a bivvy bag (plus no wet faces) for a minor weight penalty. When the storm clouds roll in you can just zip the canopy shut for a protected and dry night's sleep.

      The crossed pole design is completely free-standing, quick to put up, and stable in the event of strong winds or snowfall. The low-profile design, combined with undergrowth-coloured fabric, also makes for a particularly discreet wild camping set-up.

      The mesh panel at the back maintains air flow without letting in the midgies (essential in the Highlands in summer!) and a roll-away storm flap stops the rain getting in.

      We were able to use fabric with a waterproof performance closer to that of tent flysheets (10K HH) due to the increased water run-off provided by the canopy. The 70D nylon also offers much greater durability than ultralight backpacking tents. The zipped side entry was inspired by military-style bivouacs, allowing you to easily slip in and out during the night.

      • Weight: 900g (not including pegs)
      • Top Fabric: 70D ripstop nylon (10K HH / 6.5K MVTR)
      • Groundsheet: 70D ripstop nylon (5K HH)
      • Poles: 2x 7001 Alloy Poles (7.9mm)
      • Pegs: Alpkit Y Beams
      • Pitched: 225 x 77* x 45cm (length x width x height) *Note: The Elan tapers to 72cm at the footbox
      • Packed: 39 x 11cm (length x diameter)
      View website

      Outdoor Research Helium Bivy £200

      Pretty much the last word in lightness, the Helium Bivy is a minimalist model that gives you a single hoop for headroom, at an all-in weight of under 500g - less than some non-hooped bivvys. While it's a bit cramped compared with rivals in this review, and the liveability on offer better suits a single occasional night out than extended stays in the hills, its low weight and packability are going to appeal to dedicated backpackers, bikepackers and mountaineers. However it is not cheap compared to the other bivvys on review, so it'll be a considered investment.

      The Helium Bivvy on a summer evening in the Cairngorms  © Dan Bailey
      The Helium Bivvy on a summer evening in the Cairngorms
      © Dan Bailey

      This is the second OR bivvy I've reviewed in recent years. Compared with its sibling the Interstellar, the Helium is a lighter and simpler design:

      ;

      Weight and build quality

      At around 480g, including the stuff sack and pole (OR say 476g with pole; 417g without), the Helium Bivy suits its name. It may not be lighter than air, but in terms of hooped bivvy bags we think this is about as lightweight as you're going to find. Whether you're on an overnight mission on the hills, an alpine climb, or some sort of event, its stripped-down minimalism is likely to be one of its key selling points.

      However, the hooped design requires several pegs and a guyline in order to stand up, and these are neither included in the weight nor the price, so the headline figure is a little (though only a little) misleading. With the addition of four decent aluminium pegs sourced elsewhere, and a bit of cord for a guyline, I make it 516g.

      The Helium may be roomier than a non-hooped bivvy, but it's still clearly pretty small!  © Dan Bailey
      The Helium may be roomier than a non-hooped bivvy, but it's still clearly pretty small!
      © Dan Bailey

      Although it's light, it has a very well-made feel, and the quality of the stitching, seam taping and YKK zips all inspire confidence. Our review sample has taken a fair old battering from wind with no sign of damage. You'll want to treat its thin fabrics with a bit of care - particularly the underside on stony ground - but probably no more so than any bivvy bag of similar weight. The Helium should offer years of service.

      Fabric and poles

      With an upper in Pertex Shield 2.5L, a 30D ripstop Nylon, and a floor in 40D TPU-laminated Nylon, the Helium Bivy is made of pretty lightweight stuff, but the fabrics all seem tough enough. With its air-permeable membrane, Shield is designed, say Pertex, for 'intense mountain pursuits where weight and breathability are key'. To me this suggests its primary use is clothing, but I can't see why that wouldn't also make it a good choice for a bivvy bag. In use it seems pretty breathable, but depending on conditions all bivvys will have their limits, and on a humid summer night in mid teen temperatures I did end up with a lot of condensation inside the Helium. However, I don't imagine a waterproof bivvy bag has yet been made that could handle conditions like that much better.

      After a warm, humid night...  © Dan Bailey
      After a warm, humid night...
      © Dan Bailey

      ...there was quite a lot of condensation inside  © Dan Bailey
      ...there was quite a lot of condensation inside
      © Dan Bailey

      Far from being any old plastic, the single short shock-corded pole that forms the hoop at the head end of the bag is made of something called Delrin. Billed by manufacturers DuPont as an 'acetal homopolymer for high-load mechanical applications, and ...the ideal material in parts designed to replace metal', Delrin is said to have high strength and a wide operating temperature range (-40° to 120°). Though it looks flimsy, and weighs next to nothing, my use so far has borne out the strength claim. For winter or alpine trips, it may be nice to know it won't get brittle at survivable bivvy temperatures.

      Pitching

      As you'd expect from a bivvy bag with just one pole, putting it up is quick and easy. The pole slides into a sleeve, which secures with a sturdy velcro flap. In order for the hoop to stand upright the Helium also needs to be pegged down. There are three pegging points at the head end and two at the foot, and I would use them all to ensure the bag stays anchored to the ground if it's breezy. The structure really needs its one central guyline too. Since pegs and a guyline are essential, I think it's a bit stingy not to include them in the price, and it's disingenuous that they don't also feature in the bag weight.

      Slide the plastic pole into the sleeve and you're basically done - simples!  © Dan Bailey
      Slide the plastic pole into the sleeve and you're basically done - simples!
      © Dan Bailey

      While it's not a serious issue I have found that the upright section of the bag can twist a little in use, or lean slightly off the vertical, since the bottom ends of the arch are free to shift about; additional side pegging points at the ends of the hoop might have been good to stabilise the structure.

      To stay upright it has to be pegged and guyed out - no pegs or guyline come supplied   © Dan Bailey
      To stay upright it has to be pegged and guyed out - no pegs or guyline come supplied
      © Dan Bailey

      Interior space

      Since it's so light, perhaps it should come as no surprise that the Helium is not spacious. You get about 48cm of height at the hoop - just enough to recline on an elbow in the doorway, or affect a reasonably uncontorted entry and exit, but not much more. With a shoulder width of around 65cm, there's sufficient space to wriggle about a little, and for an inflatable mat and maybe a few loose bits and bobs down the side of the bag; but you certainly aren't going to take your rucksack under cover at night.

      The maximum length of about 208cm is measured from the tip of the toe to the outer rim of the 'clamshell' opening, but if you're maximising headroom then you'll want your head not to extend too far forward of the pole, so you can take a good 20cm off the effective body length. Down at the far end, if the bag is tightly pegged out then the height for your feet gets a bit restricted, something I notice with my size 47 plates when lying on my back.

      The 'clamshell' opening allows you to open things right up at the head end, for maximum light and air, and also creates a sort of 'porch' area of the groundsheet that you can stand on when removing your shoes to get into the bivvy, or for storing things right at the top where your head wouldn't fit - both things I've found really handy. However when you pull back the waterproof door flap it secures with just two loose toggles, creating a messy looking hanging 'curtain' effect rather than pinning neatly right up into the inside curve of the pole. As a result, if leaving the door partly unzipped at night I've found the loose fabric can hang into my face, which can be a bit annoying and claustrophobic.

      At 183cm tall, with big feet and reasonably broad shoulders, I think I'm approaching the upper size comfort limit of the Helium. If you're much larger than me then I'd suggest trying it in the shop, with a mat, before buying.

      It can stand up to a surprising amount of wind  © Dan Bailey
      It can stand up to a surprising amount of wind
      © Dan Bailey

      The insect mesh is vital for a midgey UK summer  © Dan Bailey
      The insect mesh is vital for a midgey UK summer
      © Dan Bailey

      Weather performance

      As you'd expect from its lightness, the Helium is best used in more sheltered spots, but despite this it can still take a bit more weather than you might assume. I left it pitched in a glen recently, to head up a couple of hills; while I was out the wind picked up considerably (according to the forecast, gusting up to 30mph at glen level), and while it was billowing madly on my return, the Helium remained standing and securely pegged. Just as well really, since I'd forgotten to weigh it down with stones in the morning.

      It's pretty hard to keep rain out of the entry of most bivvy bags, and still maintain enough of an opening to breathe through; the Helium is no better than most in that regard. Bivvying in heavy rain is basically always miserable. Due to its limited dimensions, this is definitely not a model to intentionally ride out bad conditions in, so I'd personally save it for a decent forecast. The same can be said of any bivvy bag of course, only more so in this case.

      Under the door flap is a separate zipped insect mesh layer, which for my money is an essential feature for a British summertime bivvy. Aside from this feature, simplicity is the name of the game.

      Packing

      As well as being the lightest hooped bivvy I've used, the Helium is the most compact when stowed away, and it's very easy to stuff the bag and pole into the storage sack provided, with room for the additional pegs you'll need to buy elsewhere too. If you're going lightweight and minimalist above all other considerations, then the Helium really would be hard to better.

      It packs small and light  © Dan Bailey
      It packs small and light
      © Dan Bailey

      Outdoor Research say:

      Our Helium Bivy used to be the best-selling, award-winning, lightest shelter offered by Outdoor Research - until we outshone it with this: The newly renovated Helium Bivy. 14% lighter than its previous version, the Helium Bivy is ideal for multiday minimalists who are looking to trade weight for speed, agility, and performance. Thru-hikers and bikepackers love the new Helium for its refined footprint and reduced weight, and trust it for its feathery waterproof and breathable Pertex® Shield+ fabric that doesn't compromise on durability. A no-nonsense clamshell opening is sure to handle seasons of adventuring to come.

      • Fabric: Pertex® Shield 2.5L, 100% nylon, 30D ripstop upper Lower - 100% nylon, 40D with TPU lamination floor
      • Weight: 476g with pole / 417g without pole
      • Fully Seam-Taped
      • No-See-Um Mesh
      • Delrin® Single-Pole System
      • Reflective Logo and Trims
      • Two Stake Loops
      • One Guy Line Loop
      • High Volume Toe End
      • Clamshell Opening
      • Top of bivy (width): 26"
      • Foot of bivy (width): 19"
      • Length: 82"
      • Packed in stuff sack: 12.25" x 3.5"
        View website

        Trekmates Squall Bivvy Bag £100

        You don't always have to spend big to equip yourself adequately for the outdoors. Models at a lower budget may lack some of the design finesse, build quality and lightness of premium brands, yet still do the job. Here's a good example. The Squall is a spacious bivvy tent for one, with enough length and head height even for quite tall users. This is a basic but effective two-poled tunnel design, and though it lacks some refinement and foul weather reassurance, it would be a decent budget buy for occasional and less demanding use. However it is really heavy for a bivvy, and our experience raises at least a question mark about quality control. While the Squall is a fine choice for the money, the Alpkit Elan is notably better at this price point.

        Testing the Squall on a summit bivvy in Fisherfield  © Dan Bailey
        Testing the Squall on a summit bivvy in Fisherfield
        © Dan Bailey

        Weight and build quality

        At 1068g (Trekmates say 980g) this is not a lightweight by hooped bivvy standards, and it's possible (at a price) to find full-blown tents that weigh less. However, if you're spending frugally then you can't have it all. For its size, the weight seems forgivable; and doubly so if you're backpacking on a budget.  

        Being an affordable option, it'll come as no surprise that the Squall is heavier and a bit more plasticy than some of the competition. The fabrics have a surdy feel, but some of the stitching seems slapdash: for instance, on the morning after my first night out, I managed to tear the front guy loop out of the seam it'd been sewn in, simply by tightening it vigorously. A bit of DIY sewing would quickly fix it, but even at £100 you shouldn't be expecting to make repairs so soon. This may have been a design flaw or a materials issue, but I suspect it's most likely down to poor quality control. Trekmates sent a full replacement bivvy, and with that I've not yet managed to replicate the problem. 

        It's quite comfy and roomy as these things go  © Dan Bailey
        It's quite comfy and roomy as these things go
        © Dan Bailey

        Fabric and poles

        This bag is 100% polyester, which as we said in the intro is less prone than nylon to sagging when wet, and withstands UV damage better; however it's not going to be as light as the nylon fabrics found on many higher end tents and bivvys, which probably helps account for the overall weight of the Squall.

        On top it's a 20D 400T Ripstop polyester, which feels thicker than some tent flys and does not crack and snap too loudly in the wind. This is Trekmates' waterproof/breathable Dry Protect fabric, with a respectable hydrostatic head of 5000mm, and breathability of 10,000 MVTR. This stuff is certainly breathable, but despite this I've noticed some quite heavy condensation - often an issue in a single skin tent or bivvy. How bad it gets will depend on conditions. For example, on a summit camp in single digit temperatures, a light breeze and a lot of cloudy moisture in the air, the inside walls were dripping wet by morning. Once the sun rose and the bag had been vented a bit, the inside soon dried; but in colder weather, or rain, we can imagine condensation being quite problematic.

        Underneath you get a mega-chunky 150D Polyester, which feels like it's up to some rough use (camping on stony ground for instance). With a 10,000mm HH, it's plenty waterproof enough for use on wet ground, and I've slept on saturated moss with no sign of anything coming through. However it's worth noting that the groundsheet is just that - a sheet - and with no bathtub-style sides, you might conceivably have an issue if it's literally flooding outside. My answer to that would typically be not to bivvy on a very wet forecast!

        Fat, barbed pegs have good holding power  © Dan Bailey
        Fat, barbed pegs have good holding power
        © Dan Bailey

        The two guylines are easy to tension   © Dan Bailey
        The two guylines are easy to tension
        © Dan Bailey

        The poles are a pretty standard non-branded aluminium. They do seem well up to the job, and as with all the components, at this price it wouldn't be realistic to expect anything more fancy.  

        Pitching

        Single skin bivvys are quick to pitch, and the Squall is no exception, though having two poles makes the process marginally more involved. The poles at head and toe slide smoothly into their sleeves, and then it's just a question of pegging out the corners and the entrance, before finishing up with the single guyline at each end - altogether the process takes just a few minutes. Eight oversized chunky pegs are supplied, and you can use them all. As for all tunnel designs, without pegs the Squall can't stand up.

        For a bivvy, it's very spacious  © Dan Bailey
        For a bivvy, it's very spacious
        © Dan Bailey

        Condensation can be an issue  © Dan Bailey
        Condensation can be an issue
        © Dan Bailey

        Interior space

        Bivvy bags are rarely known for their spaciousness, but in this regard the Squall does really well, with a large hoop at the head end and a smaller arch at the foot to create more of the feel of a very low tunnel tent than a standard single-pole hooped bivvy. Those who don't need that much room, particularly down at the feet, could go for the Storm Bivy Bag from Trekmates, which has a hoop only at the head, and costs just £85.

        It's long and low, and sheds the wind pretty well  © Dan Bailey
        It's long and low, and sheds the wind pretty well
        © Dan Bailey

        Internally I make it 215cm long, and with a vertical end wall, all of that length is usable. At 183cm tall, I've got some spare room to lie flat inside the Squall without touching the foot end, so anyone just a bit taller than me should still be OK. With a width at the door of 79cm and a height at the head end of 58cm there's generous room for head and shoulders, so while you can't sit upright you can certainly recline on an elbow. It's possible to get changed inside the bag without too many contortions, and if you have to zip in to escape weather or midges, you can read or answer emails in relative comfort without feeling like you've been sealed in a coffin. There's plenty of room around the sides to stow stuff sacks or food bags, but you won't be bringing footwear or rucksack indoors at night. It's also worth noting that thanks to the buildup of condensation, all that inside space is also welcome in order to avoid brushing the sleeping bag against the walls too much. 

        Good to have the midge net!  © Dan Bailey
        Good to have the midge net!
        © Dan Bailey

        Weather performance

        Permanently open vents at head and toe give you a guaranteed through-flow of air, and this ventilation must go some way to combating condensation. Zipping right up always seems claustrophobic in a bivvy bag, to say nothing of the suffocation risk. However the fact that the main door flap cannot be closed all the way does make you susceptible to the draught, and I've certainly felt chilly in the Squall as a result of the breeze. While a fabric cowl creates a bit of an overhang to keep falling rain from the open area at the top of the door, I doubt it'd be enough to prevent windblown rain. Pay attention to the wind direction when siting!

        When pitched, the Squall feels sturdy, its wind-shedding low profile and non-flappy fabric adding to the reassurance. But between the build quality issue, and the draughtiness, I'd suggest this model is best used in fair weather. For most occasions, you're only going to be bivvying when the forecast is reasonable in any case. When the weather's nice, more often than not the midges come out to feast - so the addition of a bug screen is positive.

        It's not the most compact, and it's a struggle to fit in its stuff sack   © Dan Bailey
        It's not the most compact, and it's a struggle to fit in its stuff sack
        © Dan Bailey

        Packing

        With a very tight fit in its bag, it's better to neatly roll the Squall Bivi along with its poles and pegs rather than hurriedly stuffing it in. This can be a bit of a rigmarole in poor weather, with wet or cold hands. When packed away it's a bigger bundle than some lightweight hooped bivvys, and even some tents, but not really too massive in the scheme of things. Again, we go back to the budget: at this price, it probably wouldn't be fair to expect something super-compact.

        Trekmates say:

        Tough and durable bivi bag with included midge net and two collapsible aluminium poles.

        • Weight: 1068g (our weight)
        • 20D 400T Ripstop polyester upper with waterproof PU coating and DWR finish
        • 150D Polyester with 10,000mm HH PU coated base panel
        • Two collapsible aluminium poles
        • Zippered opening with midge net
        • Eight lightweight aluminium pegs included
        • Adjustable guylines at front and back
        • L 225cm, W 80, H 60cm
        • Packed Size: 32cm x 11.5cm x 8cm

        For info see trekmates.co.uk

         

        View website



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        24 Sep

        Good roundup, which would you recommend for bikepacking though? Which packs down the smallest? OR Helium?

        24 Sep

        Have you tried any of these sort of tents ?

        https://www.tarptent.com/product/stratospire-li/https://zpacks.com/products/duplex-tent#weight

        Many thanks for all the reviews.

        24 Sep

        Nice review piece.

        Having owned the Alpkit Soloist for a couple of years now I can attest to the small dimensions, it's not a tent I could recommend unless budget is your overriding concern. However, given it's only 300g heavier than the Alpkit bivvy bag you would have to be nuts to pick a bivvy over a twin walled tent.

        30 Sep

        Another option to consider is an ultralight 2-person tent for only a little more cash than some of these models. I have the Nordisk Telemark 2 LW, which is currently £460 (incl. a footprint) and is lighter and roomier than any of the reviewed tents. For one person it is very comfortable. As ever, the 2-person designation is to be taken with a pinch of salt but if you're slightly built, travel light and are very friendly with the other person then it will do that job too.

        https://www.elitemountainsupplies.co.uk/camping-trekking-c4/tents-bivi-c15/nordisk-tents-c84/nordisk-telemark-2-lw-tent-with-footprint-p757

        So who gets to keep the Samaya?

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